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Illinois Compiled Statutes

Information maintained by the Legislative Reference Bureau
Updating the database of the Illinois Compiled Statutes (ILCS) is an ongoing process. Recent laws may not yet be included in the ILCS database, but they are found on this site as Public Acts soon after they become law. For information concerning the relationship between statutes and Public Acts, refer to the Guide.

Because the statute database is maintained primarily for legislative drafting purposes, statutory changes are sometimes included in the statute database before they take effect. If the source note at the end of a Section of the statutes includes a Public Act that has not yet taken effect, the version of the law that is currently in effect may have already been removed from the database and you should refer to that Public Act to see the changes made to the current law.

GENERAL PROVISIONS
(5 ILCS 175/) Electronic Commerce Security Act.

5 ILCS 175/Art. 1

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 1 heading)
ARTICLE 1. SHORT TITLE; PURPOSE

5 ILCS 175/1-101

    (5 ILCS 175/1-101)
    Sec. 1-101. Short title. This Act may be cited as the Electronic Commerce Security Act.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/1-105

    (5 ILCS 175/1-105)
    Sec. 1-105. Purposes and construction. This Act shall be construed consistently with what is commercially reasonable under the circumstances and to effectuate the following purposes:
    (1) To facilitate electronic communications by means of reliable electronic records.
    (2) To facilitate and promote electronic commerce, by eliminating barriers resulting from uncertainties over writing and signature requirements, and promoting the development of the legal and business infrastructure necessary to implement secure electronic commerce.
    (3) To facilitate electronic filing of documents with State and local government agencies, and promote efficient delivery of government services by means of reliable electronic records.
    (4) To minimize the incidence of forged electronic records, intentional and unintentional alteration of records, and fraud in electronic commerce.
    (5) To help to establish uniformity of rules and standards regarding the authentication and integrity of electronic records.
    (6) To promote public confidence in the integrity and reliability of electronic records and electronic commerce.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/1-110

    (5 ILCS 175/1-110)
    Sec. 1-110. Variation by agreement. As between parties involved in generating, sending, receiving, storing, or otherwise processing electronic records, the applicability of provisions of this Act may be waived by agreement of the parties, except for the provisions of Sections 10-140, 15-210, 15-215, 15-220, and subsection (b) of Section 10-130 of this Act.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 5

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 5 heading)
ARTICLE 5. ELECTRONIC RECORDS AND SIGNATURES GENERALLY

5 ILCS 175/5-105

    (5 ILCS 175/5-105)
    Sec. 5-105. Definitions.
    "Asymmetric cryptosystem" means a computer-based system capable of generating and using a key pair consisting of a private key for creating a digital signature and a public key to verify the digital signature.
    "Certificate" means a record that at a minimum: (a) identifies the certification authority issuing it; (b) names or otherwise identifies its subscriber or a device or electronic agent under the control of the subscriber; (c) contains a public key that corresponds to a private key under the control of the subscriber; (d) specifies its operational period; and (e) is digitally signed by the certification authority issuing it.
    "Certification authority" means a person who authorizes and causes the issuance of a certificate.
    "Certification practice statement" is a statement published by a certification authority that specifies the policies or practices that the certification authority employs in issuing, managing, suspending, and revoking certificates and providing access to them.
    "Correspond", with reference to keys, means to belong to the same key pair.
    "Digital signature" means a type of electronic signature created by transforming an electronic record using a message digest function and encrypting the resulting transformation with an asymmetric cryptosystem using the signer's private key such that any person having the initial untransformed electronic record, the encrypted transformation, and the signer's corresponding public key can accurately determine whether the transformation was created using the private key that corresponds to the signer's public key and whether the initial electronic record has been altered since the transformation was made. A digital signature is a security procedure.
    "Electronic" includes electrical, digital, magnetic, optical, electromagnetic, or any other form of technology that entails capabilities similar to these technologies.
    "Electronic record" means a record generated, communicated, received, or stored by electronic means for use in an information system or for transmission from one information system to another.
    "Electronic signature" means a signature in electronic form attached to or logically associated with an electronic record.
    "Information" includes data, text, images, sound, codes, computer programs, software, databases, and the like.
    "Key pair" means, in an asymmetric cryptosystem, 2 mathematically related keys, referred to as a private key and a public key, having the properties that (i) one key (the private key) can encrypt a message that only the other key (the public key) can decrypt, and (ii) even knowing one key (the public key), it is computationally unfeasible to discover the other key (the private key).
    "Message digest function" means an algorithm that maps or translates the sequence of bits comprising an electronic record into another, generally smaller, set of bits (the message digest) without requiring the use of any secret information such as a key, such that an electronic record yields the same message digest every time the algorithm is executed using such record as input and it is computationally unfeasible that any 2 electronic records can be found or deliberately generated that would produce the same message digest using the algorithm unless the 2 records are precisely identical.
    "Operational period of a certificate" begins on the date and time the certificate is issued by a certification authority (or on a later date and time certain if stated in the certificate) and ends on the date and time it expires as noted in the certificate or is earlier revoked, but does not include any period during which a certificate is suspended.
    "Person" means an individual, corporation, business trust, estate, trust, partnership, limited partnership, limited liability partnership, limited liability company, association, joint venture, government, governmental subdivision, agency, or instrumentality, or any other legal or commercial entity.
    "Private key" means the key of a key pair used to create a digital signature.
    "Public key" means the key of a key pair used to verify a digital signature.
    "Record" means information that is inscribed, stored, or otherwise fixed on a tangible medium or that is stored in an electronic or other medium and is retrievable in perceivable form.
    "Repository" means a system for storing and retrieving certificates or other information relevant to certificates, including information relating to the status of a certificate.
    "Revoke a certificate" means to permanently end the operational period of a certificate from a specified time forward.
    "Rule of law" means any statute, ordinance, common law rule, court decision, or other rule of law enacted, established or promulgated by the State of Illinois, or any agency, commission, department, court, other authority or political subdivision of the State of Illinois.
    "Security procedure" means a methodology or procedure used for the purpose of (1) verifying that an electronic record is that of a specific person or (2) detecting error or alteration in the communication, content, or storage of an electronic record since a specific point in time. A security procedure may require the use of algorithms or codes, identifying words or numbers, encryption, answer back or acknowledgment procedures, or similar security devices.
    "Signature device" means unique information, such as codes, algorithms, letters, numbers, private keys, or personal identification numbers (PINs), or a uniquely configured physical device, that is required, alone or in conjunction with other information or devices, in order to create an electronic signature attributable to a specific person.
    "Signed" or "signature" includes any symbol executed or adopted, or any security procedure employed or adopted, using electronic means or otherwise, by or on behalf of a person with intent to authenticate a record.
    "State agency" means and includes all officers, boards, commissions, courts, and agencies created by the Illinois Constitution, whether in the executive, legislative or judicial branch, all officers, departments, boards, commissions, agencies, institutions, authorities, universities, bodies politic and corporate of the State; and administrative units or corporate outgrowths of the State government which are created by or pursuant to statute, other than units of local government and their officers, school districts and boards of election commissioners; all administrative units and corporate outgrowths of the above and as may be created by executive order of the Governor.
    "Subscriber" means a person who is the subject named or otherwise identified in a certificate, who controls a private key that corresponds to the public key listed in that certificate, and who is the person to whom digitally signed messages verified by reference to such certificate are to be attributed.
    "Suspend a certificate" means to temporarily suspend the operational period of a certificate for a specified time period or from a specified time forward.
    "Trustworthy manner" means through the use of computer hardware, software, and procedures that, in the context in which they are used: (a) can be shown to be reasonably resistant to penetration, compromise, and misuse; (b) provide a reasonable level of reliability and correct operation; (c) are reasonably suited to performing their intended functions or serving their intended purposes; (d) comply with applicable agreements between the parties, if any; and (e) adhere to generally accepted security procedures.
    "Valid certificate" means a certificate that a certification authority has issued and that the subscriber listed in the certificate has accepted.
    "Verify a digital signature" means to use the public key listed in a valid certificate, along with the appropriate message digest function and asymmetric cryptosystem, to evaluate a digitally signed electronic record, such that the result of the process concludes that the digital signature was created using the private key corresponding to the public key listed in the certificate and the electronic record has not been altered since its digital signature was created.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/5-110

    (5 ILCS 175/5-110)
    Sec. 5-110. Legal recognition. Information, records, and signatures shall not be denied legal effect, validity, or enforceability solely on the grounds that they are in electronic form.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/5-115

    (5 ILCS 175/5-115)
    Sec. 5-115. Electronic records.
    (a) Where a rule of law requires information to be "written" or "in writing", or provides for certain consequences if it is not, an electronic record satisfies that rule of law.
    (b) The provisions of this Section shall not apply:
        (1) when its application would involve a construction
    
of a rule of law that is clearly inconsistent with the manifest intent of the lawmaking body or repugnant to the context of the same rule of law, provided that the mere requirement that information be "in writing", "written", or "printed" shall not by itself be sufficient to establish such intent;
        (2) to any rule of law governing the creation or
    
execution of a will or trust, living will, or healthcare power of attorney; and
        (3) to any record that serves as a unique and
    
transferable instrument of rights and obligations including, without limitation, negotiable instruments and other instruments of title wherein possession of the instrument is deemed to confer title, unless an electronic version of such record is created, stored, and transferred in a manner that allows for the existence of only one unique, identifiable, and unalterable original with the functional attributes of an equivalent physical instrument, that can be possessed by only one person, and which cannot be copied except in a form that is readily identifiable as a copy.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/5-120

    (5 ILCS 175/5-120)
    Sec. 5-120. Electronic signatures.
    (a) Where a rule of law requires a signature, or provides for certain consequences if a document is not signed, an electronic signature satisfies that rule of law.
    (a-5) In the course of exercising any permitting, licensing, or other regulatory function, a municipality may accept, but shall not require, documents with an electronic signature, including, but not limited to, the technical submissions of a design professional with an electronic signature.
    (b) An electronic signature may be proved in any manner, including by showing that a procedure existed by which a party must of necessity have executed a symbol or security procedure for the purpose of verifying that an electronic record is that of such party in order to proceed further with a transaction.
    (c) The provisions of this Section shall not apply:
        (1) when its application would involve a construction
    
of a rule of law that is clearly inconsistent with the manifest intent of the lawmaking body or repugnant to the context of the same rule of law, provided that the mere requirement of a "signature" or that a record be "signed" shall not by itself be sufficient to establish such intent;
        (2) to any rule of law governing the creation or
    
execution of a will or trust, living will, or healthcare power of attorney; and
        (3) to any record that serves as a unique and
    
transferable instrument of rights and obligations including, without limitation, negotiable instruments and other instruments of title wherein possession of the instrument is deemed to confer title, unless an electronic version of such record is created, stored, and transferred in a manner that allows for the existence of only one unique, identifiable, and unalterable original with the functional attributes of an equivalent physical instrument, that can be possessed by only one person, and which cannot be copied except in a form that is readily identifiable as a copy.
(Source: P.A. 98-289, eff. 1-1-14.)

5 ILCS 175/5-125

    (5 ILCS 175/5-125)
    Sec. 5-125. Original.
    (a) Where a rule of law requires information to be presented or retained in its original form, or provides consequences for the information not being presented or retained in its original form, that rule of law is satisfied by an electronic record if there exists reliable assurance as to the integrity of the information from the time when it was first generated in its final form, as an electronic record or otherwise.
    (b) The criteria for assessing integrity shall be whether the information has remained complete and unaltered, apart from the addition of any endorsement or other information that arises in the normal course of communication, storage and display. The standard of reliability required to ensure that information has remained complete and unaltered shall be assessed in the light of the purpose for which the information was generated and in the light of all the relevant circumstances.
    (c) The provisions of this Section do not apply to any record that serves as a unique and transferable instrument of rights and obligations including, without limitation, negotiable instruments and other instruments of title wherein possession of the instrument is deemed to confer title, unless an electronic version of such record is created, stored, and transferred in a manner that allows for the existence of only one unique, identifiable, and unalterable original with the functional attributes of an equivalent physical instrument, that can be possessed by only one person, and which cannot be copied except in a form that is readily identifiable as a copy.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/5-130

    (5 ILCS 175/5-130)
    Sec. 5-130. Admissibility into evidence.
    (a) In any legal proceeding, nothing in the application of the rules of evidence shall apply so as to deny the admissibility of an electronic record or electronic signature into evidence:
        (1) on the sole ground that it is an electronic
    
record or electronic signature; or
        (2) on the grounds that it is not in its original
    
form or is not an original.
    (b) Information in the form of an electronic record shall be given due evidentiary weight by the trier of fact. In assessing the evidential weight of an electronic record or electronic signature where its authenticity is in issue, the trier of fact may consider the manner in which it was generated, stored or communicated, the reliability of the manner in which its integrity was maintained, the manner in which its originator was identified or the electronic record was signed, and any other relevant information or circumstances.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/5-135

    (5 ILCS 175/5-135)
    Sec. 5-135. Retention of electronic records.
    (a) Where a rule of law requires that certain documents, records or information be retained, that requirement is met by retaining electronic records of such information in a trustworthy manner, provided that the following conditions are satisfied:
        (1) the electronic record and the information
    
contained therein are accessible so as to be usable for subsequent reference at all times when such information must be retained;
        (2) the information is retained in the format in
    
which it was originally generated, sent, or received or in a format that can be demonstrated to represent accurately the information originally generated, sent or received; and
        (3) such data as enables the identification of the
    
origin and destination of the information, the authenticity and integrity of the information, and the date and time when it was sent or received, if any, is retained.
    (b) An obligation to retain documents, records or information in accordance with subsection (a) does not extend to any data the sole purpose of which is to enable the record to be sent or received.
    (c) Nothing in this Section shall preclude any State agency from specifying additional requirements for the retention of records that are subject to the jurisdiction of such agency.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/5-140

    (5 ILCS 175/5-140)
    Sec. 5-140. Electronic use not required. Nothing in this Act shall be construed to:
        (1) require any person to create, store, transmit,
    
accept, or otherwise use or communicate information, records, or signatures by electronic means or in electronic form; or
        (2) prohibit any person engaging in an electronic
    
transaction from establishing reasonable requirements regarding the medium on which it will accept records or the method and type of symbol or security procedure it will accept as a signature.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/5-145

    (5 ILCS 175/5-145)
    Sec. 5-145. Applicability of other statutes or rules. Notwithstanding any provisions of this Act, if any other statute or rule requires approval by a State agency prior to the use or retention of electronic records or the use of electronic signatures, the provisions of that other statute or rule shall also apply.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 10

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 10 heading)
ARTICLE 10. SECURE ELECTRONIC RECORDS AND SIGNATURES

5 ILCS 175/10-105

    (5 ILCS 175/10-105)
    Sec. 10-105. Secure electronic record.
    (a) If, through the use of a qualified security procedure, it can be verified that an electronic record has not been altered since a specified point in time, then such electronic record shall be considered to be a secure electronic record from such specified point in time to the time of verification, if the relying party establishes that the qualified security procedure was:
        (1) commercially reasonable under the circumstances;
        (2) applied by the relying party in a trustworthy
    
manner; and
        (3) reasonably and in good faith relied upon by the
    
relying party.
    (b) A qualified security procedure for purposes of this Section is a security procedure to detect changes in the content of an electronic record that is:
        (1) previously agreed to by the parties; or
        (2) certified by the Secretary of State in accordance
    
with Section 10-135 as being capable of providing reliable evidence that an electronic record has not been altered.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/10-110

    (5 ILCS 175/10-110)
    Sec. 10-110. Secure electronic signature.
    (a) If, through the use of a qualified security procedure, it can be verified that an electronic signature is the signature of a specific person, then such electronic signature shall be considered to be a secure electronic signature at the time of verification, if the relying party establishes that the qualified security procedure was:
        (1) commercially reasonable under the circumstances;
        (2) applied by the relying party in a trustworthy
    
manner; and
        (3) reasonably and in good faith relied upon by the
    
relying party.
    (b) A qualified security procedure for purposes of this Section is a security procedure for identifying a person that is:
        (1) previously agreed to by the parties; or
        (2) certified by the Secretary of State in accordance
    
with Section 10-135 as being capable of creating, in a trustworthy manner, an electronic signature that:
            (A) is unique to the signer within the context in
        
which it is used;
            (B) can be used to objectively identify the
        
person signing the electronic record;
            (C) was reliably created by such identified
        
person, (e.g., because some aspect of the procedure involves the use of a signature device or other means or method that is under the sole control of such person), and that cannot be readily duplicated or compromised; and
            (D) is created, and is linked to the electronic
        
record to which it relates, in a manner such that if the record or the signature is intentionally or unintentionally changed after signing the electronic signature is invalidated.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/10-115

    (5 ILCS 175/10-115)
    Sec. 10-115. Commercially reasonable; reliance.
    (a) The commercial reasonableness of a security procedure is a question of law to be determined in light of the purposes of the procedure and the commercial circumstances at the time the procedure was used, including the nature of the transaction, sophistication of the parties, volume of similar transactions engaged in by either or both of the parties, availability of alternatives offered to but rejected by either of the parties, cost of alternative procedures, and procedures in general use for similar types of transactions.
    (b) Whether reliance on a security procedure was reasonable and in good faith is to be determined in light of all the circumstances known to the relying party at the time of the reliance, having due regard to the:
        (1) information that the relying party knew or should
    
have known of at the time of reliance that would suggest that reliance was or was not reasonable;
        (2) the value or importance of the electronic record,
    
if known;
        (3) any course of dealing between the relying party
    
and the purported sender and the available indicia of reliability or unreliability apart from the security procedure;
        (4) any usage of trade, particularly trade conducted
    
by trustworthy systems or other computer-based means; and
        (5) whether the verification was performed with the
    
assistance of an independent third party.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/10-120

    (5 ILCS 175/10-120)
    Sec. 10-120. Presumptions.
    (a) In resolving a civil dispute involving a secure electronic record, it shall be rebuttably presumed that the electronic record has not been altered since the specific point in time to which the secure status relates.
    (b) In resolving a civil dispute involving a secure electronic signature, it shall be rebuttably presumed that the secure electronic signature is the signature of the person to whom it correlates.
    (c) The effect of presumptions provided in this Section is to place on the party challenging the integrity of a secure electronic record or challenging the genuineness of a secure electronic signature both the burden of going forward with evidence to rebut the presumption and the burden of persuading the trier of fact that the nonexistence of the presumed fact is more probable than its existence.
    (d) In the absence of a secure electronic record or a secure electronic signature, nothing in this Act shall change existing rules regarding legal or evidentiary rules regarding the burden of proving the authenticity and integrity of an electronic record or an electronic signature.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/10-125

    (5 ILCS 175/10-125)
    Sec. 10-125. Creation and control of signature devices. Except as otherwise provided by another applicable rule of law, whenever the creation, validity, or reliability of an electronic signature created by a qualified security procedure under Section 10-105 or 10-110 is dependent upon the secrecy or control of a signature device of the signer:
    (1) the person generating or creating the signature device must do so in a trustworthy manner;
    (2) the signer and all other persons that rightfully have access to such signature device must exercise reasonable care to retain control and maintain the secrecy of the signature device, and to protect it from any unauthorized access, disclosure, or use, during the period when reliance on a signature created by such device is reasonable;
    (3) in the event that the signer, or any other person that rightfully has access to such signature device, knows or has reason to know that the secrecy or control of any such signature device has been compromised, such person must make a reasonable effort to promptly notify all persons that such person knows might foreseeably be damaged as a result of such compromise, or where an appropriate publication mechanism is available (which, for State agencies, may include the official newspaper designated pursuant to Section 4 of the Illinois Purchasing Act where appropriate), to publish notice of the compromise and a disavowal of any signatures created thereafter.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/10-130

    (5 ILCS 175/10-130)
    Sec. 10-130. Attribution of signature.
    (a) Except as provided by another applicable rule of law, a secure electronic signature is attributable to the person to whom it correlates, whether or not authorized, if:
        (1) the electronic signature resulted from acts of a
    
person that obtained the signature device or other information necessary to create the signature from a source under the control of the alleged signer, creating the appearance that it came from that party;
        (2) the access or use occurred under circumstances
    
constituting a failure to exercise reasonable care by the alleged signer; and
        (3) the relying party relied reasonably and in good
    
faith to its detriment on the apparent source of the electronic record.
    (b) The provisions of this Section shall not apply to transactions intended primarily for personal, family, or household use, or otherwise defined as consumer transactions by applicable law including, but not limited to, credit card and automated teller machine transactions except to the extent allowed by applicable consumer law.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/10-135

    (5 ILCS 175/10-135)
    Sec. 10-135. Secretary of State authority to certify security procedures.
    (a) A security procedure may be certified by the Secretary of State, as a qualified security procedure for purposes of Sections 10-105 or 10-110, following an appropriate investigation or review, if:
        (1) the security procedure (including any technology
    
and algorithms it employs) is completely open and fully disclosed to the public, and has been so for a sufficient length of time, so as to facilitate a comprehensive review and evaluation of its suitability for the intended purpose by the applicable information security or scientific community; and
        (2) the security procedure (including any technology
    
and algorithms it employs) has been generally accepted in the applicable information security or scientific community as being capable of satisfying the requirements of Section 10-105 or 10-110, as applicable, in a trustworthy manner.
    (b) In making a determination regarding whether the security procedure (including any technology and algorithms it employs) has been generally accepted in the applicable information security or scientific community, the Secretary of State shall consider the opinion of independent experts in the applicable field and the published findings of such community, including applicable standards organizations such as the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), International Standards Organization (ISO), International Telecommunications Union (ITU), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
    (c) Such certification shall be done through the adoption of rules in accordance with the provisions of the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act and shall specify a full and complete identification of the security procedure, including requirements as to how it is to be implemented, if appropriate.
    (d) The Secretary of State may also decertify a security procedure as a qualified security procedure for purposes of Sections 10-105 or 10-110 following an appropriate investigation or review and the adoption of rules in accordance with the provisions of the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act if subsequent developments establish that the security procedure is no longer sufficiently trustworthy or reliable for its intended purpose, or for any other reason no longer meets the requirements for certification.
    (e) The Secretary of State shall have exclusive authority to certify security procedures under this Section.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/10-140

    (5 ILCS 175/10-140)
    Sec. 10-140. Unauthorized use of signature device.
    (a) No person shall knowingly or intentionally access, copy, or otherwise obtain possession of or recreate the signature device of another person without authorization for the purpose of creating, or allowing or causing another person to create, an unauthorized electronic signature using such signature device. A person convicted of a violation of this subsection shall be guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.
    (b) No person shall knowingly alter, disclose, or use the signature device of another person without authorization, or in excess of lawful authorization, for the purpose of creating, or allowing or causing another person to create, an unauthorized electronic signature using such signature device. A person convicted of a violation of this subsection shall be guilty of a Class 4 felony. A person convicted of a violation of this subsection who has previously been convicted of a violation of this subsection or Section 15-210 shall be guilty of a Class 3 felony. A person who violates this Section in furtherance of any scheme or artifice to defraud in excess of $50,000 shall be guilty of a Class 2 felony.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 15

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 15 heading)
ARTICLE 15. EFFECT OF A DIGITAL SIGNATURE

5 ILCS 175/15-101

    (5 ILCS 175/15-101)
    Sec. 15-101. Secure electronic record. A digital signature that is created using an asymmetric algorithm certified by the Secretary of State under item (2) of subsection (b) of Section 10-105 shall be considered to be a qualified security procedure for purposes of detecting changes in the content of an electronic record under Section 10-105 if the digital signature was created during the operational period of a valid certificate, and is verified by reference to the public key listed in such certificate.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-105

    (5 ILCS 175/15-105)
    Sec. 15-105. Secure electronic signature. A digital signature that is created using an asymmetric algorithm certified by the Secretary of State under item (2) of subsection (b) of Section 10-110 shall be considered to be a qualified security procedure for purposes of identifying a person under Section 10-110 if:
        (1) the digital signature was created during the
    
operational period of a valid certificate, was used within the scope of any other restrictions specified or incorporated by reference in the certificate, if any, and can be verified by reference to the public key listed in the certificate; and
        (2) the certificate is considered trustworthy (i.e.,
    
an accurate binding of a public key to a person's identity) because the certificate was issued by a certification authority in accordance with standards, procedures, and other requirements specified by the Secretary of State, or the trier of fact independently finds that the certificate was issued in a trustworthy manner by a certification authority that properly authenticated the subscriber and the subscriber's public key, or otherwise finds that the material information set forth in the certificate is true.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-115

    (5 ILCS 175/15-115)
    Sec. 15-115. Secretary of State authority to adopt rules.
    (a) The Secretary of State may adopt rules applicable to both the public and private sectors for the purpose of defining when a certificate is considered sufficiently trustworthy under Section 15-105 such that a digital signature verified by reference to such a certificate will be considered a qualified security procedure under Section 10-110. The rules may include (1) establishing or adopting standards applicable to certification authorities or certificates, compliance with which may be measured by becoming certified by the Secretary of State, becoming accredited by one or more independent accrediting entities recognized by the Secretary of State, or by other appropriate means and (2) where appropriate, establishing fees to be charged by the Secretary of State to recover all or a portion of its costs in connection therewith.
    (b) In developing the rules, the Secretary of State shall endeavor to do so in a manner that will provide maximum flexibility to the implementation of digital signature technology and the business models necessary to support it, that will provide a clear basis for the recognition of certificates issued by foreign certification authorities, and, to the extent reasonably possible, that will maximize the opportunities for uniformity with the laws of other jurisdictions (both within the United States and internationally).
    (c) The Secretary of State shall have exclusive authority to adopt rules authorized by this Section.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-201

    (5 ILCS 175/15-201)
    Sec. 15-201. Reliance on certificates foreseeable. It is foreseeable that persons relying on a digital signature will also rely on a valid certificate containing the public key by which the digital signature can be verified, during the operational period of such certificate and within any limits specified in such certificate.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-205

    (5 ILCS 175/15-205)
    Sec. 15-205. Restrictions on publication of certificate. No person may publish a certificate, or otherwise knowingly make it available to anyone likely to rely on the certificate or on a digital signature that is verifiable with reference to the public key listed in the certificate, if such person knows that:
        (1) the certification authority listed in the
    
certificate has not issued it;
        (2) the subscriber listed in the certificate has not
    
accepted it; or
        (3) the certificate has been revoked or suspended,
    
unless such publication is for the purpose of verifying a digital signature created prior to such revocation or suspension, or giving notice of revocation or suspension.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-210

    (5 ILCS 175/15-210)
    Sec. 15-210. Fraudulent use. No person shall knowingly create, publish, alter, or otherwise use a certificate for any fraudulent or other unlawful purpose. A person convicted of a violation of this Section shall be guilty of a Class 4 felony. A person convicted of a violation of this Section who previously has been convicted of a violation of this Section or Section 10-140 shall be guilty of a Class 3 felony. A person who violates this Section in furtherance of any scheme or artifice to defraud in excess of $50,000 shall be guilty of a Class 2 felony.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-215

    (5 ILCS 175/15-215)
    Sec. 15-215. False or unauthorized request. No person shall knowingly misrepresent his or her identity or authorization in requesting or accepting a certificate or in requesting suspension or revocation of a certificate. A person convicted of a violation of this Section shall be guilty of a Class A misdemeanor. A person who violates this Section 10 times within a 12-month period, or in furtherance of any scheme or artifice to defraud, shall be guilty of a Class 4 felony. A person who violates this Section in furtherance of any scheme or artifice to defraud in excess of $50,000 shall be guilty of a Class 2 felony.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-220

    (5 ILCS 175/15-220)
    Sec. 15-220. Unauthorized use of signature device. No person shall knowingly access, alter, disclose, or use the signature device of a certification authority used to issue certificates without authorization, or in excess of lawful authorization, for the purpose of creating, or allowing or causing another person to create, an unauthorized electronic signature using such signature device. A person convicted of a violation of this Section shall be guilty of a Class 3 felony. A person who violates this Section in furtherance of any scheme or artifice to defraud shall be guilty of a Class 2 felony.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-301

    (5 ILCS 175/15-301)
    Sec. 15-301. Trustworthy services. Except as conspicuously set forth in its certification practice statement, a certification authority and a person maintaining a repository must maintain its operations and perform its services in a trustworthy manner.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-305

    (5 ILCS 175/15-305)
    Sec. 15-305. Disclosure.
    (a) For each certificate issued by a certification authority with the intention that it will be relied upon by third parties to verify digital signatures created by subscribers, a certification authority must publish or otherwise make available to the subscriber and all such relying parties:
        (1) its certification practice statement, if any,
    
applicable thereto; and
        (2) its certificate that identifies the certification
    
authority as a subscriber and that contains the public key corresponding to the private key used by the certification authority to digitally sign the certificate (its "certification authority certificate").
    (b) In the event of an occurrence that materially and adversely affects a certification authority's operations or system, its certification authority certificate, or any other aspect of its ability to operate in a trustworthy manner, the certification authority must act in accordance with procedures governing such an occurrence specified in its certification practice statement, or in the absence of such procedures, must use reasonable efforts to notify any persons that the certification authority knows might foreseeably be damaged as a result of such occurrence.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-310

    (5 ILCS 175/15-310)
    Sec. 15-310. Issuance of a certificate. A certification authority may issue a certificate to a prospective subscriber for the purpose of allowing third parties to verify digital signatures created by the subscriber only after:
    (1) the certification authority has received a request for issuance from the prospective subscriber; and
    (2) the certification authority has:
        (A) complied with all of the relevant practices and
    
procedures set forth in its applicable certification practice statement, if any; or
        (B) in the absence of a certification practice
    
statement addressing these issues, confirmed in a trustworthy manner that:
            (i) the prospective subscriber is the person to
        
be listed in the certificate to be issued;
            (ii) the information in the certificate to be
        
issued is accurate; and
            (iii) the prospective subscriber rightfully holds
        
a private key capable of creating a digital signature, and the public key to be listed in the certificate can be used to verify a digital signature affixed by such private key.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-315

    (5 ILCS 175/15-315)
    Sec. 15-315. Representations upon issuance of certificate.
    (a) By issuing a certificate with the intention that it will be relied upon by third parties to verify digital signatures created by the subscriber, a certification authority represents to the subscriber, and to any person who reasonably relies on information contained in the certificate, in good faith and during its operational period, that:
        (1) the certification authority has processed,
    
approved, and issued, and will manage and revoke if necessary, the certificate in accordance with its applicable certification practice statement stated or incorporated by reference in the certificate or of which such person has notice, or in lieu thereof, in accordance with this Act or the law of the jurisdiction governing issuance of the certificate;
        (2) the certification authority has verified the
    
identity of the subscriber to the extent stated in the certificate or its applicable certification practice statement, or in lieu thereof, that the certification authority has verified the identity of the subscriber in a trustworthy manner;
        (3) the certification authority has verified that the
    
person requesting the certificate holds the private key corresponding to the public key listed in the certificate; and
        (4) except as conspicuously set forth in the
    
certificate or its applicable certification practice statement, to the certification authority's knowledge as of the date the certificate was issued, all other information in the certificate is accurate, and not materially misleading.
    (b) If a certification authority issued the certificate subject to the laws of another jurisdiction, the certification authority also makes all warranties and representations, if any, otherwise applicable under the law governing its issuance.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/15-320

    (5 ILCS 175/15-320)
    Sec. 15-320. Revocation of a certificate.
    (a) During the operational period of a certificate, the certification authority that issued the certificate must revoke the certificate in accordance with the policies and procedures governing revocation specified in its applicable certification practice statement, or in the absence of such policies and procedures, as soon as possible after:
        (1) receiving a request for revocation by the
    
subscriber named in the certificate, and confirming that the person requesting revocation is the subscriber, or is an agent of the subscriber with authority to request the revocation;
        (2) receiving a certified copy of an individual
    
subscriber's death certificate, or upon confirming by other reliable evidence that the subscriber is dead;
        (3) being presented with documents effecting a
    
dissolution of a corporate subscriber, or confirmation by other evidence that the subscriber has been dissolved or has ceased to exist;
        (4) being served with an order requiring revocation
    
that was issued by a court of competent jurisdiction; or
        (5) confirmation by the certification authority that:
            (A) a material fact represented in the
        
certificate is false;
            (B) a material prerequisite to issuance of the
        
certificate was not satisfied;
            (C) the certification authority's private key or
        
system operations were compromised in a manner materially affecting the certificate's reliability; or
            (D) the subscriber's private key was compromised.
    (b) Upon effecting such a revocation, the certification authority must notify the subscriber and relying parties in accordance with the policies and procedures governing notice of revocation specified in its applicable certification practice statement, or in the absence of such policies and procedures, promptly notify the subscriber, promptly publish notice of the revocation in all repositories where the certification authority previously caused publication of the certificate, and otherwise disclose the fact of revocation on inquiry by a relying party.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 20

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 20 heading)
ARTICLE 20. DUTIES OF SUBSCRIBERS

5 ILCS 175/20-101

    (5 ILCS 175/20-101)
    Sec. 20-101. Obtaining a certificate. All material representations knowingly made by a person to a certification authority for purposes of obtaining a certificate naming such person as a subscriber must be accurate and complete to the best of such person's knowledge and belief.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/20-105

    (5 ILCS 175/20-105)
    Sec. 20-105. Acceptance of a certificate.
    (a) A person accepts a certificate that names such person as a subscriber by publishing or approving publication of it to one or more persons, or in a repository, or otherwise demonstrating approval of it, while knowing or having notice of its contents.
    (b) By accepting a certificate, the subscriber listed in the certificate represents to any person who reasonably relies on information contained in the certificate, in good faith and during its operational period, that:
        (1) the subscriber rightfully holds the private key
    
corresponding to the public key listed in the certificate;
        (2) all representations made by the subscriber to the
    
certification authority and material to the information listed in the certificate are true; and
        (3) all information in the certificate that is within
    
the knowledge of the subscriber is true.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/20-110

    (5 ILCS 175/20-110)
    Sec. 20-110. Revocation of certificate. Except as otherwise provided by another applicable rule of law, if the private key corresponding to the public key listed in a valid certificate is lost, stolen, accessible to an unauthorized person, or otherwise compromised during the operational period of the certificate, a subscriber who has learned of the compromise must promptly request the issuing certification authority to revoke the certificate and publish notice of revocation in all repositories in which the subscriber previously authorized the certificate to be published, or otherwise provide reasonable notice of the revocation.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 25

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 25 heading)
ARTICLE 25. STATE AGENCY USE OF
ELECTRONIC RECORDS AND SIGNATURES

5 ILCS 175/25-101

    (5 ILCS 175/25-101)
    Sec. 25-101. State agency use of electronic records.
    (a) Each State agency shall determine if, and the extent to which, it will send and receive electronic records and electronic signatures to and from other persons and otherwise create, use, store, and rely upon electronic records and electronic signatures.
    (b) In any case where a State agency decides to send or receive electronic records, or to accept document filings by electronic records, the State agency may, by appropriate agency rule (or court rule where appropriate), giving due consideration to security, specify:
        (1) the manner and format in which such electronic
    
records must be created, sent, received, and stored;
        (2) if such electronic records must be signed, the
    
type of electronic signature required, the manner and format in which such signature must be affixed to the electronic record, and the identity of, or criteria that must be met by, any third party used by the person filing the document to facilitate the process;
        (3) control processes and procedures as appropriate
    
to ensure adequate integrity, security, confidentiality, and auditability of such electronic records; and
        (4) any other required attributes for such electronic
    
records that are currently specified for corresponding paper documents, or reasonably necessary under the circumstances.
    (c) All rules adopted by a State agency shall include the relevant minimum security requirements established by the Department of Central Management Services, if any.
    (d) Whenever any rule of law requires or authorizes the filing of any information, notice, lien, or other document or record with any State agency, a filing made by an electronic record shall have the same force and effect as a filing made on paper in all cases where the State agency has authorized or agreed to such electronic filing and the filing is made in accordance with applicable rules or agreement.
    (e) Nothing in this Act shall be construed to require any State agency to use or to permit the use of electronic records or electronic signatures.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/25-105

    (5 ILCS 175/25-105)
    Sec. 25-105. Department of Central Management Services to adopt State standards.
    (a) The Department of Central Management Services may adopt rules setting forth minimum security requirements for the use of electronic records and electronic signatures by State agencies.
    (b) The Department of Central Management Services shall specify appropriate minimum security requirements to be implemented and followed by State agencies for (1) the generation, use, and storage of key pairs, (2) the issuance, acceptance, use, suspension, and revocation of certificates, and (3) the use of digital signatures.
    (c) Each State agency shall have the authority to issue, or contract for the issuance of, certificates to (i) its employees and agents and (ii) persons conducting business or other transactions with such State agency and to take other actions consistent therewith, including the establishment of repositories and the suspension or revocation of certificates so issued, provided that the foregoing is conducted in accordance with all the rules, procedures, and policies specified by the Department of Central Management Services. The Department of Central Management Services shall have the authority to specify the rules, procedures, and policies whereby State agencies may issue or contract for the issuance of certificates.
    (d) The Department of Central Management Services may specify appropriate minimum standards and requirements that must be satisfied by a certification authority before:
        (1) its services are used by any State agency for the
    
issuance, publication, revocation, and suspension of certificates to such agency, or its employees or agents (for official use); or
        (2) the certificates it issues will be accepted for
    
purposes of verifying digitally signed electronic records sent to any State agency by any person.
    (e) Where appropriate, the rules adopted by the Department of Central Management Services pursuant to this Section shall specify differing levels of minimum standards from which implementing State agencies can select the standard most appropriate for a particular application.
    (f) The General Assembly, through the Joint Committee on Legislative Support Services, and the Supreme Court, separately for the respective branches, may adopt rules setting forth the minimum security requirements for the use of electronic records and electronic signatures by the respective branches. The rules shall generally be consistent with the rules adopted by the Department of Central Management Services. The Joint Committee on Legislative Support Services and the Supreme Court may also accept the rules adopted by the Department of Central Management Services for the use of electronic records and electronic signatures by the respective branches.
    (g) Except as provided in subsection (f) and in Section 25-101, the Department of Central Management Services shall have exclusive authority to adopt rules authorized by this Section.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/25-115

    (5 ILCS 175/25-115)
    Sec. 25-115. Interoperability. To the extent reasonable under the circumstances, rules adopted by the Department of Central Management Services or a State agency relating to the use of electronic records or electronic signatures shall be drafted in a manner designed to encourage and promote consistency and interoperability with similar requirements adopted by government agencies of other states and the federal government.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 27

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 27 heading)
ARTICLE 27. ELECTRONIC COMMERCE SECURITY CERTIFICATION FUND

5 ILCS 175/27-5

    (5 ILCS 175/27-5)
    Sec. 27-5. Electronic Commerce Security Certification Fund. Fees collected by the Secretary of State under Section 15-115 of this Act must be deposited into the Electronic Commerce Security Certification Fund, a special fund created in the State treasury. Subject to appropriation, moneys in the Fund shall be used by the Secretary of State for the administration of this Act.
(Source: P.A. 91-58, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 30

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 30 heading)
ARTICLE 30. ENFORCEMENT; CIVIL REMEDY; SEVERABILITY

5 ILCS 175/30-1

    (5 ILCS 175/30-1)
    Sec. 30-1. Enforcement. The Secretary of State may investigate complaints or other information indicating violations of rules adopted by the Secretary of State under this Act. The Secretary of State shall certify to the Attorney General, for such action as the Attorney General may deem appropriate, all information he or she obtains that discloses a violation of any provision of this Act or the rules adopted by the Secretary of State under this Act.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/30-5

    (5 ILCS 175/30-5)
    Sec. 30-5. Civil remedy. Whoever suffers loss by reason of a violation of Section 10-140, 15-210, 15-215, or 15-220 of this Act or Section 17-3 of the Criminal Code of 1961 or the Criminal Code of 2012 may, in a civil action against the violator, obtain appropriate relief. In a civil action under this Section, the court may award to the prevailing party reasonable attorneys fees and other litigation expenses.
(Source: P.A. 97-1150, eff. 1-25-13.)

5 ILCS 175/30-110

    (5 ILCS 175/30-110)
    Sec. 30-110. Severability. The provisions of this Act are severable under Section 1.31 of the Statute on Statutes.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 95

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 95 heading)
ARTICLE 95. AMENDATORY PROVISIONS

5 ILCS 175/95-1

    (5 ILCS 175/95-1)
    Sec. 95-1. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99; text omitted.)

5 ILCS 175/95-5

    (5 ILCS 175/95-5)
    Sec. 95-5. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted.)
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99; text omitted.)

5 ILCS 175/95-10

    (5 ILCS 175/95-10)
    Sec. 95-10. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99; text omitted.)

5 ILCS 175/95-15

    (5 ILCS 175/95-15)
    Sec. 95-15. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99; text omitted.)

5 ILCS 175/Art. 99

 
    (5 ILCS 175/Art. 99 heading)
ARTICLE 99. EFFECTIVE DATE

5 ILCS 175/99-1

    (5 ILCS 175/99-1)
    Sec. 99-1. Effective date. This Act takes effect July 1, 1999.
(Source: P.A. 90-759, eff. 7-1-99.)