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Illinois Compiled Statutes

Information maintained by the Legislative Reference Bureau
Updating the database of the Illinois Compiled Statutes (ILCS) is an ongoing process. Recent laws may not yet be included in the ILCS database, but they are found on this site as Public Acts soon after they become law. For information concerning the relationship between statutes and Public Acts, refer to the Guide.

Because the statute database is maintained primarily for legislative drafting purposes, statutory changes are sometimes included in the statute database before they take effect. If the source note at the end of a Section of the statutes includes a Public Act that has not yet taken effect, the version of the law that is currently in effect may have already been removed from the database and you should refer to that Public Act to see the changes made to the current law.

ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY
(415 ILCS 5/) Environmental Protection Act.

415 ILCS 5/Tit. II

 
    (415 ILCS 5/Tit. II heading)
TITLE II: AIR POLLUTION

415 ILCS 5/8

    (415 ILCS 5/8) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1008)
    Sec. 8. The General Assembly finds that pollution of the air of this State constitutes a menace to public health and welfare, creates public nuisances, adds to cleaning costs, accelerates the deterioration of materials, adversely affects agriculture, business, industry, recreation, climate, and visibility, depresses property values, and offends the senses.
    It is the purpose of this Title to restore, maintain, and enhance the purity of the air of this State in order to protect health, welfare, property, and the quality of life and to assure that no air contaminants are discharged into the atmosphere without being given the degree of treatment or control necessary to prevent pollution.
(Source: P.A. 76-2429.)

415 ILCS 5/9

    (415 ILCS 5/9) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1009)
    Sec. 9. Acts prohibited. No person shall:
    (a) Cause or threaten or allow the discharge or emission of any contaminant into the environment in any State so as to cause or tend to cause air pollution in Illinois, either alone or in combination with contaminants from other sources, or so as to violate regulations or standards adopted by the Board under this Act.
    (b) Construct, install, or operate any equipment, facility, vehicle, vessel, or aircraft capable of causing or contributing to air pollution or designed to prevent air pollution, of any type designated by Board regulations, (1) without a permit granted by the Agency unless otherwise exempt by this Act or Board regulations or (2) in violation of any conditions imposed by such permit.
    (c) Cause or allow the open burning of refuse, conduct any salvage operation by open burning, or cause or allow the burning of any refuse in any chamber not specifically designed for the purpose and approved by the Agency pursuant to regulations adopted by the Board under this Act; except that the Board may adopt regulations permitting open burning of refuse in certain cases upon a finding that no harm will result from such burning, or that any alternative method of disposing of such refuse would create a safety hazard so extreme as to justify the pollution that would result from such burning.
    (d) Sell, offer, or use any fuel or other article in any areas in which the Board may by regulation forbid its sale, offer, or use for reasons of air-pollution control.
    (e) Use, cause or allow the spraying of loose asbestos for the purpose of fireproofing or insulating any building or building material or other constructions, or otherwise use asbestos in such unconfined manner as to permit asbestos fibers or particles to pollute the air.
    (f) Commencing July 1, 1985, sell any used oil for burning or incineration in any incinerator, boiler, furnace, burner or other equipment unless such oil meets standards based on virgin fuel oil or re-refined oil, as defined in ASTM D-396 or specifications under VV-F-815C promulgated pursuant to the federal Energy Policy and Conservation Act, and meets the manufacturer's and current NFDA code standards for which such incinerator, boiler, furnace, burner or other equipment was approved, except that this prohibition does not apply to a sale to a permitted used oil re-refining or reprocessing facility or sale to a facility permitted by the Agency to burn or incinerate such oil.
    Nothing herein shall limit the effect of any section of this Title with respect to any form of asbestos, or the spraying of any form of asbestos, or limit the power of the Board under this Title to adopt additional and further regulations with respect to any form of asbestos, or the spraying of any form of asbestos.
    This Section shall not limit the burning of landscape waste upon the premises where it is produced or at sites provided and supervised by any unit of local government, except within any county having a population of more than 400,000. Nothing in this Section shall prohibit the burning of landscape waste for agricultural purposes, habitat management (including but not limited to forest and prairie reclamation), or firefighter training. For the purposes of this Act, the burning of landscape waste by production nurseries shall be considered to be burning for agricultural purposes.
    Any grain elevator located outside of a major population area, as defined in Section 211.3610 of Title 35 of the Illinois Administrative Code, shall be exempt from the requirements of Section 212.462 of Title 35 of the Illinois Administrative Code provided that the elevator: (1) does not violate the prohibitions of subsection (a) of this Section or have a certified investigation, as defined in Section 211.970 of Title 35 of the Illinois Administrative Code, on file with the Agency and (2) is not required to obtain a Clean Air Act Permit Program permit pursuant to Section 39.5. Notwithstanding the above exemption, new stationary source performance standards for grain elevators, established pursuant to Section 9.1 of this Act and Section 111 of the federal Clean Air Act, shall continue to apply to grain elevators.
(Source: P.A. 97-95, eff. 7-12-11.)

415 ILCS 5/9.1

    (415 ILCS 5/9.1) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1009.1)
    Sec. 9.1. (a) The General Assembly finds that the federal Clean Air Act, as amended, and regulations adopted pursuant thereto establish complex and detailed provisions for State-federal cooperation in the field of air pollution control, provide for a Prevention of Significant Deterioration program to regulate the issuance of preconstruction permits to insure that economic growth will occur in a manner consistent with the preservation of existing clean air resources, and also provide for plan requirements for nonattainment areas to regulate the construction, modification and operation of sources of air pollution to insure that economic growth will occur in a manner consistent with the goal of achieving the national ambient air quality standards, and that the General Assembly cannot conveniently or advantageously set forth in this Act all the requirements of such federal Act or all regulations which may be established thereunder.
    It is the purpose of this Section to avoid the existence of duplicative, overlapping or conflicting State and federal regulatory systems.
    (b) The provisions of Section 111 of the federal Clean Air Act (42 USC 7411), as amended, relating to standards of performance for new stationary sources, and Section 112 of the federal Clean Air Act (42 USC 7412), as amended, relating to the establishment of national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants are applicable in this State and are enforceable under this Act. Any such enforcement shall be stayed consistent with any stay granted in any federal judicial action to review such standards. Enforcement shall be consistent with the results of any such judicial review.
    (c) The Board shall adopt regulations establishing permit programs for PSD and NA NSR permits meeting the respective requirements of Sections 165 and 173 of the Clean Air Act (42 USC 7475 and 42 USC 7503) as amended. The Agency may adopt procedures for the administration of such programs.
    The regulations adopted by the Board to establish a PSD permit program shall incorporate by reference, pursuant to subsection (a) of Section 5-75 of the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act, the provisions of 40 CFR 52.21, except for the following subparts: (a)(1) Plan disapproval, (q) Public participation, (s) Environmental impact statements, (t) Disputed permits or redesignations and (u) Delegation of authority; the Board may adopt more stringent or additional provisions to the extent it deems appropriate. To the extent that the provisions of 40 CFR 52.21 provide for the Administrator to make various determinations and to take certain actions, these provisions shall be modified to indicate the Agency if appropriate. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to limit the right of any person to submit a proposal to the Board or the authority of the Board to adopt elements of a PSD permit program that are more stringent than those contained in 40 CFR 52.21, pursuant to the rulemaking requirements of Title VII of this Act and Section 5-35 of the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act.
    (d) No person shall:
        (1) violate any provisions of Sections 111, 112, 165
    
or 173 of the Clean Air Act, as now or hereafter amended, or federal regulations adopted pursuant thereto; or
        (2) construct, install, modify or operate any
    
equipment, building, facility, source or installation which is subject to regulation under Sections 111, 112, 165 or 173 of the Clean Air Act, as now or hereafter amended, except in compliance with the requirements of such Sections and federal regulations adopted pursuant thereto, and no such action shall be undertaken (A) without a permit granted by the Agency whenever a permit is required pursuant to (i) this Act or Board regulations or (ii) Section 111, 112, 165, or 173 of the Clean Air Act or federal regulations adopted pursuant thereto or (B) in violation of any conditions imposed by such permit. The issuance or any denial of such a PSD permit or any conditions imposed therein shall be reviewable by the Board in accordance with Section 40.3 of this Act. Other permits addressed in this subsection (d) shall be reviewable by the Board in accordance with Section 40 of this Act.
    (e) The Board shall exempt from regulation under the State Implementation Plan for ozone the volatile organic compounds which have been determined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to be exempt from regulation under state implementation plans for ozone due to negligible photochemical reactivity. In accordance with subsection (b) of Section 7.2, the Board shall adopt regulations identical in substance to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency exemptions or deletion of exemptions published in policy statements on the control of volatile organic compounds in the Federal Register by amending the list of exemptions to the Board's definition of volatile organic material found at 35 Ill. Adm. Code Part 211. The provisions and requirements of Title VII of this Act shall not apply to regulations adopted under this subsection. Section 5-35 of the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act, relating to procedures for rulemaking, does not apply to regulations adopted under this subsection. However, the Board shall provide for notice, a hearing if required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and public comment before adopted rules are filed with the Secretary of State. The Board may consolidate into a single rulemaking under this subsection all such federal policy statements published in the Federal Register within a period of time not to exceed 6 months.
    (f) (Blank).
(Source: P.A. 98-284, eff. 8-9-13; 99-463, eff. 1-1-16.)

415 ILCS 5/9.2

    (415 ILCS 5/9.2) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1009.2)
    Sec. 9.2. Sulfur dioxide emission standards.
    (a) (Blank.)
    (b) In granting any alternative emission standard or variance relating to sulfur dioxide emissions from a coal-burning stationary source, the Board may require the use of Illinois coal as a condition of such alternative standard or variance, provided that the Board determines that Illinois coal of the proper quality is available and competitive in price; such determination shall include consideration of the cost of pollution control equipment and the economic impact on the Illinois coal mining industry.
(Source: P.A. 92-574, eff. 9-26-02.)

415 ILCS 5/9.3

    (415 ILCS 5/9.3) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1009.3)
    Sec. 9.3. Alternative control strategies.
    (a) The General Assembly finds that control strategies, including emission limitations, alternative but environmentally equivalent to those required by Board regulations or the terms of this Act, can assure equivalent protection of the environment and that the use of such alternative control strategies can encourage technological innovation, reduce the likelihood of shutdown of older sources, and can result in decreased costs of compliance and increased availability of resources for use in productive capital investments.
    (b) (Blank.)
    (c) On or before December 31, 1982, the Board shall adopt regulations establishing a permit program pursuant to Section 39.1 in accordance with Title VII of this Act.
    (d) Board rules pursuant to this Section 9.3 shall set forth reasonable requirements for issuance of an alternative control strategy permit, provided that the Board may not impose any condition or requirement more stringent than required by the Clean Air Act or for compliance with this Act or other Board regulations thereunder. The Agency shall promptly adopt any necessary procedures for the administration of such permit programs. The burden of establishing that any procedure, condition or requirement imposed by the Agency in or for the issuance of a permit is more stringent than required by applicable law shall be upon the permit applicant.
(Source: P.A. 92-574, eff. 6-26-02.)

415 ILCS 5/9.4

    (415 ILCS 5/9.4) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1009.4)
    Sec. 9.4. Municipal waste incineration emission standards.
    (a) The General Assembly finds:
        (1) That air pollution from municipal waste
    
incineration may constitute a threat to public health, welfare and the environment. The amounts and kinds of pollutants depend on the nature of the waste stream, operating conditions of the incinerator, and the effectiveness of emission controls. Under normal operating conditions, municipal waste incinerators produce pollutants such as organic compounds, metallic compounds and acid gases which may be a threat to public health, welfare and the environment.
        (2) That a combustion and flue-gas control system,
    
which is properly designed, operated and maintained, can substantially reduce the emissions of organic materials, metallic compounds and acid gases from municipal waste incineration.
    (b) It is the purpose of this Section to insure that emissions from new municipal waste incineration facilities which burn a total of 25 tons or more of municipal waste per day are adequately controlled.
    Such facilities shall be subject to emissions limits and operating standards based upon the application of Best Available Control Technology, as determined by the Agency, for emissions of the following categories of pollutants:
        (1) particulate matter, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen
    
oxides;
        (2) acid gases;
        (3) heavy metals; and
        (4) organic materials.
    (c) The Agency shall issue permits, pursuant to Section 39, to new municipal waste incineration facilities only if the Agency finds that such facilities are designed, constructed and operated so as to comply with the requirements prescribed by this Section.
    Prior to adoption of Board regulations under subsection (d) of this Section the Agency may issue permits for the construction of new municipal waste incineration facilities. The Agency determination of Best Available Control Technology shall be based upon consideration of the specific pollutants named in subsection (d), and emissions of particulate matter, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.
    Nothing in this Section shall limit the applicability of any other Sections of this Act, or of other standards or regulations adopted by the Board, to municipal waste incineration facilities. In issuing such permits, the Agency may prescribe those conditions necessary to assure continuing compliance with the emission limits and operating standards determined pursuant to subsection (b); such conditions may include the monitoring and reporting of emissions.
    (d) Within one year after July 1, 1986, the Board shall adopt regulations pursuant to Title VII of this Act, which define the terms in items (2), (3) and (4) of subsection (b) of this Section which are to be used by the Agency in making its determination pursuant to this Section. The provisions of Section 27(b) of this Act shall not apply to this rulemaking.
    Such regulations shall be written so that the categories of pollutants include, but need not be limited to, the following specific pollutants:
        (1) hydrogen chloride in the definition of acid gases;
        (2) arsenic, cadmium, mercury, chromium, nickel and
    
lead in the definition of heavy metals; and
        (3) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins,
    
polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the definition of organic materials.
    (e) For the purposes of this Section, the term "Best Available Control Technology" means an emission limitation (including a visible emission standard) based on the maximum degree of pollutant reduction which the Agency, on a case-by-case basis, taking into account energy, environmental and economic impacts, determines is achievable through the application of production processes or available methods, systems and techniques, including fuel cleaning or treatment or innovative fuel combustion techniques. If the Agency determines that technological or economic limitations on the application of measurement methodology to a particular class of sources would make the imposition of an emission standard not feasible, it may instead prescribe a design, equipment, work practice or operational standard, or combination thereof, to require the application of best available control technology. Such standard shall, to the degree possible, set forth the emission reduction achievable by implementation of such design, equipment, work practice or operation and shall provide for compliance by means which achieve equivalent results.
    (f) "Municipal waste incineration" means the burning of municipal waste or fuel derived therefrom in a combustion apparatus designed to burn municipal waste that may produce electricity or steam as a by-product. A "new municipal waste incinerator" is an incinerator initially permitted for development or construction after January 1, 1986.
    (g) The provisions of this Section shall not apply to industrial incineration facilities that burn waste generated at the same site.
(Source: P.A. 91-357, eff. 7-29-99; 92-574, eff. 6-26-02.)

415 ILCS 5/9.5

    (415 ILCS 5/9.5) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1009.5)
    Sec. 9.5. (a) The General Assembly finds that:
    (1) The public health and welfare may be endangered by the release of toxic contaminants into the air which are carcinogenic, teratogenic, mutagenic or otherwise injurious to humans or the environment.
    (2) Existing federal programs may not be adequate to protect the public and the environment from low-level, chronic exposure to toxic air contaminants.
    (b) It is the purpose of this Section to establish a State program to identify and adopt regulations for toxic air contaminants in Illinois.
    (c) The Board, pursuant to Title VII, shall promulgate a list of toxic air contaminants. The list published under this subsection shall include any air contaminant which may cause or significantly contribute to an increase in mortality or an increase in serious irreversible or incapacitating reversible illness, or may pose a significant threat to human health or the environment. The Agency shall propose to the Board for adoption a list which meets the requirement of this subsection.
    The provisions of subsection (b) of Section 27 of this Act shall not apply to rulemakings under this subsection (c).
    (d) The Board, pursuant to Title VII, shall adopt regulations establishing a program to control toxic contaminants released into the air in a manner that protects the public health and the environment. The Agency shall propose regulations to the Board for adoption which meet the requirements of this subsection.
    (e) The requirements of this Section shall not apply to the following:
    (1) retail dry cleaning operations;
    (2) retail and noncommercial storage and handling of motor fuels;
    (3) combustion processes using only commercial fuel, including internal combustion engines;
    (4) incidental or minor sources including laboratory-scale operations, and such other sources or categories of sources which are determined by the Board to be of minor significance.
(Source: P.A. 85-752.)

415 ILCS 5/9.6

    (415 ILCS 5/9.6) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1009.6)
    Sec. 9.6. Air pollution operating permit fee.
    (a) For any site for which an air pollution operating permit is required, other than a site permitted solely as a retail liquid dispensing facility that has air pollution control equipment or an agrichemical facility with an endorsed permit pursuant to Section 39.4, the owner or operator of that site shall pay an initial annual fee to the Agency within 30 days of receipt of the permit and an annual fee each year thereafter for as long as a permit is in effect. The owner or operator of a portable emission unit, as defined in 35 Ill. Adm. Code 201.170, may change the site of any unit previously permitted without paying an additional fee under this Section for each site change, provided that no further change to the permit is otherwise necessary or requested.
    (b) The following fee amounts shall apply:
        (1) The fee for a site permitted to emit less than 25
    
tons per year of any combination of regulated air pollutants, as defined in Section 39.5 of this Act, except greenhouse gases, is $200 per year beginning July 1, 2003, and increases, beginning January 1, 2012, to $235 per year for lifetime operating permits and $235 per year for federally enforceable state operating permits, except as provided in subsection (c) of this Section.
        (2) The fee for a site permitted to emit at least 25
    
tons per year but less than 100 tons per year of any combination of regulated air pollutants, as defined in Section 39.5 of this Act, except greenhouse gases, is $1,800 per year beginning July 1, 2003, and increases, beginning January 1, 2012, to $2,150 per year, except as provided in subsection (c) of this Section.
        (3) The fee for a site permitted to emit at least 100
    
tons per year of any combination of regulated air pollutants, as defined in Section 39.5 of this Act, except greenhouse gases, is $18 per ton, per year, beginning July 1, 2003, and increases, beginning January 1, 2012 to $21.50 per ton, per year, except as provided in subsection (c) of this Section. However, the maximum fee under this paragraph (3) is $3,500 before January 1, 2012, and is $4,112 beginning January 1, 2012.
    (c) The owner or operator of any site subject to subsection (b) of this Section that becomes subject to Section 39.5 of this Act shall continue to pay the fee set forth in this Section until the site becomes subject to the CAAPP fee set forth within subsection 18 of Section 39.5 of this Act. If an owner or operator has paid a fee under this Section during the 12-month period following the effective date of the CAAPP for that site, the amount of that fee shall be deducted from the amount due under subsection 18 of Section 39.5 of this Act.
    (d) Only one air pollution site fee may be collected from any site, even if such site receives more than one air pollution control permit.
    (e) The Agency shall establish procedures for the collection of air pollution site fees. Air pollution site fees may be paid annually, or in advance for the number of years for which the permit is issued, at the option of the owner or operator. Payment in advance does not exempt the owner or operator from paying any increase in the fee that may occur during the term of the permit; the owner or operator must pay the amount of the increase upon and from the effective date of the increase.
    (f) The Agency may deny an application for the issuance, transfer, or renewal of an air pollution operating permit if any air pollution site fee owed by the applicant has not been paid within 60 days of the due date, unless the applicant, at the time of application, pays to the Agency in advance the air pollution site fee for the site that is the subject of the operating permit, plus any other air pollution site fees then owed by the applicant. The denial of an air pollution operating permit for failure to pay an air pollution site fee shall be subject to review by the Board pursuant to the provisions of subsection (a) of Section 40 of this Act.
    (g) If the Agency determines that an owner or operator of a site was required, but failed, to timely obtain an air pollution operating permit, and as a result avoided the payment of permit fees, the Agency may collect the avoided permit fees with or without pursuing enforcement under Section 31 of this Act. The avoided permit fees shall be calculated as double the amount that would have been owed had a permit been timely obtained. Fees collected pursuant to this subsection (g) shall be deposited into the Environmental Protection Permit and Inspection Fund.
    (h) If the Agency determines that an owner or operator of a site was required, but failed, to timely obtain an air pollution operating permit and as a result avoided the payment of permit fees, an enforcement action may be brought under Section 31 of this Act. In addition to any other relief that may be obtained as part of this action, the Agency may seek to recover the avoided permit fees. The avoided permit fees shall be calculated as double the amount that would have been owed had a permit been timely obtained. Fees collected pursuant to this subsection (h) shall be deposited into the Environmental Protection Permit and Inspection Fund.
    (i) If a permittee subject to a fee under this Section fails to pay the fee within 90 days of its due date, or makes the fee payment from an account with insufficient funds to cover the amount of the fee payment, the Agency shall notify the permittee of the failure to pay the fee. If the permittee fails to pay the fee within 60 days after such notification, the Agency may, by written notice, immediately revoke the air pollution operating permit. Failure of the Agency to notify the permittee of failure to pay a fee due under this Section, or the payment of the fee from an account with insufficient funds to cover the amount of the fee payment, does not excuse or alter the duty of the permittee to comply with the provisions of this Section.
(Source: P.A. 97-95, eff. 7-12-11.)

415 ILCS 5/9.7

    (415 ILCS 5/9.7) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1009.7)
    Sec. 9.7. CFC's. The General Assembly hereby finds that the manufacture and use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) present a serious threat to the environment, and declares it to be the public policy of this State to discourage the unnecessary use of CFCs, to encourage producers of CFCs to replace them with alternative substances that have a less deleterious impact on the environment, and to promote the use of equipment to recover and recycle existing CFCs.
(Source: P.A. 90-372, eff. 7-1-98.)

415 ILCS 5/9.8

    (415 ILCS 5/9.8)
    Sec. 9.8. Emissions reductions market system.
    (a) The General Assembly finds:
        (1) That achieving compliance with the ozone
    
attainment provisions of federal Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 calls for innovative and cost-effective implementation strategies.
        (2) That economic incentives and market-based
    
approaches can be used to achieve clean air compliance in an innovative and cost-effective manner.
        (3) That development and operation of an emissions
    
market system should significantly lessen the economic impacts associated with implementation of the federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and still achieve the desired air quality for the area.
    (b) The Agency shall design an emissions market system that will assist the State in meeting applicable post-1996 provisions under the CAAA of 1990, provide maximum flexibility for designated sources that reduce emissions, and that takes into account the findings of the national ozone transport assessment, existing air quality conditions, and resultant emissions levels necessary to achieve or maintain attainment.
    (c) The Agency may develop proposed rules for a market-based emissions reduction, banking, and trading system that will enable stationary sources to implement cost-effective, compliance options. In developing such a market system, the Agency may take into consideration a suitable ozone control season and related reconciliation period, seasonal allotments of actual emissions and adjustments thereto, phased participation by size of source, suitable emissions and compliance monitoring provisions, an annual allotment set-aside for market assurance, and suitable means for the market system to be provided for in an appropriate State implementation plan. The proposal shall be filed with the Board and shall be subject to the rulemaking provisions of Sections 27 and 28 of this Act. The rules adopted by the Board shall include provisions that:
        (1) Assure that compliance with the required
    
emissions reductions under the market system shall be, at a minimum, as cost-effective as the traditional regulatory control requirements in the State of Illinois.
        (2) Assure that emissions reductions under the market
    
system will not be mandated unless it is necessary for the attainment and maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone in the Chicago nonattainment area, as required of this State by applicable federal law or regulation.
        (3) Assure that sources subject to the program will
    
not be required to reduce emissions to an extent that exceeds their proportionate share of the total emission reductions required of all emission sources, including mobile and area sources, to attain and maintain the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone in the Chicago nonattainment area.
        (4) Assure that credit is given or exclusion is
    
granted for those emission units which have reduced emissions, either voluntarily or through the application of maximum available control technology or national emissions standards for hazardous air pollutants, such that those reductions would be counted as if they had occurred after the initiation of the program.
        (5) Assure that unusual or abnormal operational
    
patterns can be accounted for in the determination of any source's baseline from which reductions would be made.
        (6) Assure that relative economic impact and
    
technical feasibility of emissions reductions under the banking and trading program, as compared to other alternatives, is considered.
        (7) Assure that the feasibility of measuring and
    
quantifying emissions is considered in developing and adopting the banking and trading program.
    (d) Notwithstanding the other provisions of this Act, any source or other authorized person that participates in an emissions market system shall be eligible to exchange allotment trading units with other sources provided that established rules are followed.
    (e) There is hereby created within the State Treasury an interest-bearing special fund to be known as the Alternative Compliance Market Account Fund, which shall be used and administered by the Agency for the following public purposes:
        (1) To accept and retain funds from persons who
    
purchase allotment trading units from the Agency pursuant to regulatory provisions and payments of interest and principal.
        (2) To purchase services, equipment, or commodities
    
that help generate emissions reductions in or around the ozone nonattainment area in Northeastern Illinois.
(Source: P.A. 89-173, eff. 7-19-95; 89-465, eff. 6-13-96.)

415 ILCS 5/9.9

    (415 ILCS 5/9.9)
    Sec. 9.9. Nitrogen oxides trading system.
    (a) The General Assembly finds:
        (1) That USEPA has issued a Final Rule published in
    
the Federal Register on October 27, 1998, entitled "Finding of Significant Contribution and Rulemaking for Certain States in the Ozone Transport Assessment Group Region for Purposes of Reducing Regional Transport of Ozone", hereinafter referred to as the "NOx SIP Call", compliance with which will require reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides ("NOx");
        (2) That reducing emissions of NOx in the State helps
    
the State to meet the national ambient air quality standard for ozone;
        (3) That emissions trading is a cost-effective means
    
of obtaining reductions of NOx emissions.
    (b) The Agency shall propose and the Board shall adopt regulations to implement an interstate NOx trading program (hereinafter referred to as the "NOx Trading Program") as provided for in 40 CFR Part 96, including incorporation by reference of appropriate provisions of 40 CFR Part 96 and regulations to address 40 CFR Section 96.4(b), Section 96.55(c), Subpart E, and Subpart I. In addition, the Agency shall propose and the Board shall adopt regulations to implement NOx emission reduction programs for cement kilns and stationary internal combustion engines.
    (c) Allocations of NOx allowances to large electric generating units ("EGUs") and large non-electric generating units ("non-EGUs"), as defined by 40 CFR Part 96.4(a), shall not exceed the State's trading budget for those source categories to be included in the State Implementation Plan for NOx.
    (d) In adopting regulations to implement the NOx Trading Program, the Board shall:
        (1) assure that the economic impact and technical
    
feasibility of NOx emissions reductions under the NOx Trading Program are considered relative to the traditional regulatory control requirements in the State for EGUs and non-EGUs;
        (2) provide that emission units, as defined in
    
Section 39.5(1) of this Act, may opt into the NOx Trading Program;
        (3) provide for voluntary reductions of NOx emissions
    
from emission units, as defined in Section 39.5(1) of this Act, not otherwise included under paragraph (c) or (d)(2) of this Section to provide additional allowances to EGUs and non-EGUs to be allocated by the Agency. The regulations shall further provide that such voluntary reductions are verifiable, quantifiable, permanent, and federally enforceable;
        (4) provide that the Agency allocate to non-EGUs
    
allowances that are designated in the rule, unless the Agency has been directed to transfer the allocations to another unit subject to the requirements of the NOx Trading Program, and that upon shutdown of a non-EGU, the unit may transfer or sell the NOx allowances that are allocated to such unit;
        (5) provide that the Agency shall set aside annually
    
a number of allowances, not to exceed 5% of the total EGU trading budget, to be made available to new EGUs; and
        (6) provide that those EGUs that commence commercial
    
operation, as defined in 40 CFR Section 96.2, at a time that is more than half way through the control period in 2003 shall return to the Agency any allowances that were issued to it by the Agency and were not used for compliance in 2004.
    (d-5) The Agency may sell NOx allowances to sources in Illinois that are subject to 35 Ill. Adm. Code 217, either Subpart U or W, as follows:
        (1) any unearned Early Reduction Credits set aside
    
for non-EGUs under 35 Ill. Adm. Code 217, Subpart U, but only to those sources that make qualifying early reductions of NOx in 2003 pursuant to 35 Ill. Adm. Code 217 for which the source did not receive an allocation thereunder. If the Agency receives requests to purchase more ERCs than are available for sale, allowances shall be offered for sale to qualifying sources on a pro-rata basis;
        (2) any remaining Early Reduction Credits allocated
    
under 35 Ill. Adm. Code 217, Subpart U or W, that could not be allocated on a pro-rata, whole allowance basis, but only to those sources that made qualifying early reductions of NOx in 2003 pursuant to 35 Ill. Adm. Code 217 for which the source did not receive an allocation;
        (3) any allowances under 35 Ill. Adm. Code 217,
    
Subpart W, that remain after each 3-year allocation period that could not be allocated on a pro-rata, whole allowance basis pursuant to the provisions of Subpart W; and
        (4) any allowances requested from the New Source Set
    
Aside for those sources that commenced operation, as defined in 40 CFR Section 96.2, on or after January 1, 2004.
    (d-10) The selling price for ERC allowances shall be 70% of the market price index for 2005 NOx allowances, determined by the Agency as follows:
        (1) using the mean of 2 or more published market
    
price indexes for the 2005 NOx allowances as of October 6, 2003; or
        (2) if there are not 2 published market price indexes
    
for 2005 NOx allowances as of October 6, 2003, the Agency may use any reasonable indication of market price.
    (e) The Agency may adopt procedural rules, as necessary, to implement the regulations promulgated by the Board pursuant to subsections (b) and (d) and to implement subsections (d-5), (d-10), (i), and (j) of this Section.
    (f) Notwithstanding any provisions in subparts T, U, and W of Section 217 of Title 35 of the Illinois Administrative Code to the contrary, compliance with the regulations promulgated by the Board pursuant to subsections (b) and (d) of this Section is required by May 31, 2004.
    (g) To the extent that a court of competent jurisdiction finds a provision of 40 CFR Part 96 invalid, the corresponding Illinois provision shall be stayed until such provision of 40 CFR Part 96 is found to be valid or is re-promulgated. To the extent that USEPA or any court of competent jurisdiction stays the applicability of any provision of the NOx SIP Call to any person or circumstance relating to Illinois, during the period of that stay, the effectiveness of the corresponding Illinois provision shall be stayed. To the extent that the invalidity of the particular requirement or application does not affect other provisions or applications of the NOx SIP Call pursuant to 40 CFR 51.121 or the NOx trading program pursuant to 40 CFR Part 96 or 40 CFR Part 97, this Section, and rules or regulations promulgated hereunder, will be given effect without the invalid provisions or applications.
    (h) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, any source or other authorized person that participates in the NOx Trading Program shall be eligible to exchange NOx allowances with other sources in accordance with this Section and with regulations promulgated by the Board or the Agency.
    (i) There is hereby created within the State Treasury an interest-bearing special fund to be known as the NOx Trading System Fund. Moneys generated from the sale of NOx allowances from the New Source Set Aside or the sale of allowances pursuant to subsection (d-5) of this Section shall be deposited into the Fund. This Fund shall be used and administered by the Agency for the purposes stated below:
        (1) To accept funds from persons who purchase NOx
    
allowances from the New Source Set Aside from the Agency;
        (2) To disburse the proceeds of the sale of the NOx
    
allowances from the New Source Set Aside, to the extent that proceeds remain after the Agency has recouped the reasonable costs incurred by the Agency in the administration of the NOx SIP Call Program, pro-rata to the owners or operators of the EGUs that received allowances from the Agency but not from the Agency's New Source Set Aside, in accordance with regulations that may be promulgated by the Agency; and
        (3) To finance the reasonable costs incurred by the
    
Agency in the administration of the NOx SIP Call Program.
    (j) Moneys generated from the sale of early reduction credits shall be deposited into the Clean Air Act Permit Fund created pursuant to Section 39.5(18)(d) of this Act, and the proceeds shall be used and administered by the Agency to finance the costs associated with the Clean Air Act Permit Program.
(Source: P.A. 92-12, eff. 7-1-01; 92-279, eff. 8-7-01; 93-669, eff. 3-19-04.)

415 ILCS 5/9.10

    (415 ILCS 5/9.10)
    Sec. 9.10. Fossil fuel-fired electric generating plants.
    (a) The General Assembly finds and declares that:
        (1) fossil fuel-fired electric generating plants are
    
a significant source of air emissions in this State and have become the subject of a number of important new studies of their effects on the public health;
        (2) existing state and federal policies, that allow
    
older plants that meet federal standards to operate without meeting the more stringent requirements applicable to new plants, are being questioned on the basis of their environmental impacts and the economic distortions such policies cause in a deregulated energy market;
        (3) fossil fuel-fired electric generating plants are,
    
or may be, affected by a number of regulatory programs, some of which are under review or development on the state and national levels, and to a certain extent the international level, including the federal acid rain program, tropospheric ozone, mercury and other hazardous pollutant control requirements, regional haze, and global warming;
        (4) scientific uncertainty regarding the formation
    
of certain components of regional haze and the air quality modeling that predict impacts of control measures requires careful consideration of the timing of the control of some of the pollutants from these facilities, particularly sulfur dioxides and nitrogen oxides that each interact with ammonia and other substances in the atmosphere;
        (5) the development of energy policies to promote a
    
safe, sufficient, reliable, and affordable energy supply on the state and national levels is being affected by the on-going deregulation of the power generation industry and the evolving energy markets;
        (6) the Governor's formation of an Energy Cabinet and
    
the development of a State energy policy calls for actions by the Agency and the Board that are in harmony with the energy needs and policy of the State, while protecting the public health and the environment;
        (7) Illinois coal is an abundant resource and an
    
important component of Illinois' economy whose use should be encouraged to the greatest extent possible consistent with protecting the public health and the environment;
        (8) renewable forms of energy should be promoted as
    
an important element of the energy and environmental policies of the State and that it is a goal of the State that at least 5% of the State's energy production and use be derived from renewable forms of energy by 2010 and at least 15% from renewable forms of energy by 2020;
        (9) efforts on the state and federal levels are
    
underway to consider the multiple environmental regulations affecting electric generating plants in order to improve the ability of government and the affected industry to engage in effective planning through the use of multi-pollutant strategies; and
        (10) these issues, taken together, call for a
    
comprehensive review of the impact of these facilities on the public health, considering also the energy supply, reliability, and costs, the role of renewable forms of energy, and the developments in federal law and regulations that may affect any state actions, prior to making final decisions in Illinois.
    (b) Taking into account the findings and declarations of the General Assembly contained in subsection (a) of this Section, the Agency shall, before September 30, 2004, but not before September 30, 2003, issue to the House and Senate Committees on Environment and Energy findings that address the potential need for the control or reduction of emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric generating plants, including the following provisions:
        (1) reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions, as
    
appropriate, with consideration of maximum annual emissions rate limits or establishment of an emissions trading program and with consideration of the developments in federal law and regulations that may affect any State action, prior to making final decisions in Illinois;
        (2) reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions, as
    
appropriate, with consideration of maximum annual emissions rate limits or establishment of an emissions trading program and with consideration of the developments in federal law and regulations that may affect any State action, prior to making final decisions in Illinois;
        (3) incentives to promote renewable sources of energy
    
consistent with item (8) of subsection (a) of this Section;
        (4) reduction of mercury as appropriate,
    
consideration of the availability of control technology, industry practice requirements, or incentive programs, or some combination of these approaches that are sufficient to prevent unacceptable local impacts from individual facilities and with consideration of the developments in federal law and regulations that may affect any state action, prior to making final decisions in Illinois; and
        (5) establishment of a banking system, consistent
    
with the United States Department of Energy's voluntary reporting system, for certifying credits for voluntary offsets of emissions of greenhouse gases, as identified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, or other voluntary reductions of greenhouse gases. Such reduction efforts may include, but are not limited to, carbon sequestration, technology-based control measures, energy efficiency measures, and the use of renewable energy sources.
    The Agency shall consider the impact on the public health, considering also energy supply, reliability and costs, the role of renewable forms of energy, and developments in federal law and regulations that may affect any state actions, prior to making final decisions in Illinois.
    (c) Nothing in this Section is intended to or should be interpreted in a manner to limit or restrict the authority of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency to propose, or the Illinois Pollution Control Board to adopt, any regulations applicable or that may become applicable to the facilities covered by this Section that are required by federal law.
    (d) The Agency may file proposed rules with the Board to effectuate its findings provided to the Senate Committee on Environment and Energy and the House Committee on Environment and Energy in accordance with subsection (b) of this Section. Any such proposal shall not be submitted sooner than 90 days after the issuance of the findings provided for in subsection (b) of this Section. The Board shall take action on any such proposal within one year of the Agency's filing of the proposed rules.
    (e) This Section shall apply only to those electrical generating units that are subject to the provisions of Subpart W of Part 217 of Title 35 of the Illinois Administrative Code, as promulgated by the Illinois Pollution Control Board on December 21, 2000.
(Source: P.A. 92-12, eff. 7-1-01; 92-279, eff. 8-7-01.)

415 ILCS 5/9.11

    (415 ILCS 5/9.11)
    Sec. 9.11. Great Lakes Areas of Concern; mercury.
    (a) The General Assembly finds that:
        (1) The government of the United States of America
    
and the government of Canada have entered into agreements on Great Lakes water quality by signature of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1978, which was amended by Protocol signed on November 18, 1987.
        (2) The government of the United States of America
    
and the government of Canada, in cooperation with the state and provincial governments, were required to designate geographic areas, called Areas of Concern, that fail to meet the general or specific objectives of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, and where such failure has caused or is likely to cause impairment of beneficial use or failure of the ability of the area to support aquatic life.
        (3) The government of the United States of America
    
and the government of Canada have identified 43 Areas of Concern, 26 of which are in waters of the United States of America and 17 of which are in the waters of Canada.
        (4) Waukegan Harbor in Illinois was designated an
    
Area of Concern in 1981 by the International Joint Commission, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency as a result of the discovery of 5 beneficial use impairments, as defined in Annex 2 of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. Beneficial use impairments at the Waukegan Harbor Area of Concern were identified as the restrictions on fish consumption, degradation of benthos, restrictions on dredging activities, degradation of phytoplankton and zooplankton populations, and loss of fish and wildlife habitat.
        (5) The government of the United States of America
    
and the government of Canada cooperate with the state and provincial governments to ensure that remedial action plans are developed to restore all impaired uses to the Areas of Concern.
        (6) Mercury has been identified as a persistent
    
bioaccumulative contaminant of concern throughout the Great Lakes, including Lake Michigan, resulting in health advisories and restrictions on fish consumption.
        (7) The thermal treatment of sludge creates mercury
    
emissions.
    (b) The Agency shall not issue any permit to develop, construct, or operate, within one mile of any portion of Lake Michigan that has been designated an Area of Concern under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement as of the effective date of this Section, any site or facility for the thermal treatment of sludge, unless the applicant submits to the Agency proof that the site or facility has received local siting approval from the governing body of the municipality in which the site or facility is proposed to be located (or from the county board if located in an unincorporated area), in accordance with Section 39.2 of this Act. For the purposes of this Section, "thermal treatment" includes, without limitation, drying, incinerating, and any other processing that subjects the sludge to an elevated temperature.
(Source: P.A. 93-202, eff. 7-14-03.)

415 ILCS 5/9.12

    (415 ILCS 5/9.12)
    Sec. 9.12. Construction permit fees for air pollution sources.
    (a) An applicant for a new or revised air pollution construction permit shall pay a fee, as established in this Section, to the Agency at the time that he or she submits the application for a construction permit. Except as set forth below, the fee for each activity or category listed in this Section is separate and is cumulative with any other applicable fee listed in this Section.
    (b) The fee amounts in this subsection (b) apply to construction permit applications relating to (i) a source subject to Section 39.5 of this Act (the Clean Air Act Permit Program); (ii) a source that, upon issuance of the requested construction permit, will become a major source subject to Section 39.5; or (iii) a source that has or will require a federally enforceable State operating permit limiting its potential to emit.
        (1) Base fees for each construction permit
    
application shall be assessed as follows:
            (A) If the construction permit application
        
relates to one or more new emission units or to a combination of new and modified emission units, a fee of $4,000 for the first new emission unit and a fee of $1,000 for each additional new or modified emission unit; provided that the total base fee under this subdivision (A) shall not exceed $10,000.
            (B) If the construction permit application
        
relates to one or more modified emission units but not to any new emission unit, a fee of $2,000 for the first modified emission unit and a fee of $1,000 for each additional modified emission unit; provided that the total base fee under this subdivision (B) shall not exceed $5,000.
        (2) Supplemental fees for each construction permit
    
application shall be assessed as follows:
            (A) If, based on the construction permit
        
application, the source will be, but is not currently, subject to Section 39.5 of this Act, a CAAPP entry fee of $5,000.
            (B) If the construction permit application
        
involves (i) a new source or emission unit subject to Section 39.2 of this Act, (ii) a commercial incinerator or other municipal waste, hazardous waste, or waste tire incinerator, (iii) a commercial power generator, or (iv) one or more other emission units designated as a complex source by Agency rulemaking, a fee of $25,000.
            (C) If the construction permit application
        
involves an emissions netting exercise or reliance on a contemporaneous emissions decrease for a pollutant to avoid application of the PSD permit program or nonattainment new source review, a fee of $3,000 for each such pollutant.
            (D) If the construction permit application is for
        
a new major source subject to the PSD permit program, a fee of $12,000.
            (E) If the construction permit application is for
        
a new major source subject to nonattainment new source review, a fee of $20,000.
            (F) If the construction permit application is for
        
a major modification subject to the PSD permit program, a fee of $6,000.
            (G) If the construction permit application is for
        
a major modification subject to nonattainment new source review, a fee of $12,000.
            (H) (Blank).
            (I) If the construction permit application review
        
involves a determination of the Maximum Achievable Control Technology standard for a pollutant and the project is not otherwise subject to BACT or LAER for a related pollutant under the PSD permit program or nonattainment new source review, a fee of $5,000 per unit for which a determination is requested or otherwise required.
            (J) (Blank).
        (3) If a public hearing is held regarding the
    
construction permit application, an administrative fee of $10,000. This fee shall be submitted at the time the applicant requests a public hearing or, if a public hearing is not requested by the applicant, then within 30 days after the applicant is informed by the Agency that a public hearing will be held.
    (c) The fee amounts in this subsection (c) apply to construction permit applications relating to a source that, upon issuance of the construction permit, will not (i) be or become subject to Section 39.5 of this Act (the Clean Air Act Permit Program) or (ii) have or require a federally enforceable state operating permit limiting its potential to emit.
        (1) Base fees for each construction permit
    
application shall be assessed as follows:
            (A) For a construction permit application
        
involving a single new emission unit, a fee of $500.
            (B) For a construction permit application
        
involving more than one new emission unit, a fee of $1,000.
            (C) For a construction permit application
        
involving no more than 2 modified emission units, a fee of $500.
            (D) For a construction permit application
        
involving more than 2 modified emission units, a fee of $1,000.
        (2) Supplemental fees for each construction permit
    
application shall be assessed as follows:
            (A) If the source is a new source, i.e., does not
        
currently have an operating permit, an entry fee of $500;
            (B) If the construction permit application
        
involves (i) a new source or emission unit subject to Section 39.2 of this Act, (ii) a commercial incinerator or a municipal waste, hazardous waste, or waste tire incinerator, (iii) a commercial power generator, or (iv) an emission unit designated as a complex source by Agency rulemaking, a fee of $15,000.
        (3) If a public hearing is held regarding the
    
construction permit application, an administrative fee of $10,000. This fee shall be submitted at the time the applicant requests a public hearing or, if a public hearing is not requested by the applicant, then within 30 days after the applicant is informed by the Agency that a public hearing will be held.
    (d) If no other fee is applicable under this Section, a construction permit application addressing one or more of the following shall be subject to a filing fee of $500:
        (1) A construction permit application to add or
    
replace a control device on a permitted emission unit.
        (2) A construction permit application to conduct a
    
pilot project or trial burn for a permitted emission unit.
        (3) A construction permit application for a land
    
remediation project.
        (4) (Blank).
        (5) A construction permit application to revise an
    
emissions testing methodology or the timing of required emissions testing.
        (6) A construction permit application that provides
    
for a change in the name, address, or phone number of any person identified in the permit, or for a change in the stated ownership or control, or for a similar minor administrative permit change at the source.
    (e) No fee shall be assessed for a request to correct an issued permit that involves only an Agency error, if the request is received within the deadline for a permit appeal to the Pollution Control Board.
    (f) The applicant for a new or revised air pollution construction permit shall submit to the Agency, with the construction permit application, both a certification of the fee that he or she estimates to be due under this Section and the fee itself.
    (g) Notwithstanding the requirements of subsection (a) of Section 39 of this Act, the application for an air pollution construction permit shall not be deemed to be filed with the Agency until the Agency receives the initial air pollution construction permit application fee and the certified estimate of the fee required by this Section. Unless the Agency has received the initial air pollution construction permit application fee and the certified estimate of the fee required by this Section, the Agency is not required to review or process the application.
    (h) If the Agency determines at any time that a construction permit application is subject to an additional fee under this Section that the applicant has not submitted, the Agency shall notify the applicant in writing of the amount due under this Section. The applicant shall have 60 days to remit the assessed fee to the Agency.
    If the proper fee established under this Section is not submitted within 60 days after the request for further remittance:
        (1) If the construction permit has not yet been
    
issued, the Agency is not required to further review or process, and the provisions of subsection (a) of Section 39 of this Act do not apply to, the application for a construction permit until such time as the proper fee is remitted.
        (2) If the construction permit has been issued, the
    
Agency may, upon written notice, immediately revoke the construction permit.
    The denial or revocation of a construction permit does not excuse the applicant from the duty of paying the fees required under this Section.
    (i) The Agency may deny the issuance of a pending air pollution construction permit or the subsequent operating permit if the applicant has not paid the required fees by the date required for issuance of the permit. The denial or revocation of a permit for failure to pay a construction permit fee is subject to review by the Board pursuant to the provisions of subsection (a) of Section 40 of this Act.
    (j) If the owner or operator undertakes construction without obtaining an air pollution construction permit, the fee under this Section is still required. Payment of the required fee does not preclude the Agency or the Attorney General or other authorized persons from pursuing enforcement against the applicant for failure to have an air pollution construction permit prior to commencing construction.
    (k) If an air pollution construction permittee makes a fee payment under this Section from an account with insufficient funds to cover the amount of the fee payment, the Agency shall notify the permittee of the failure to pay the fee. If the permittee fails to pay the fee within 60 days after such notification, the Agency may, by written notice, immediately revoke the air pollution construction permit. Failure of the Agency to notify the permittee of the permittee's failure to make payment does not excuse or alter the duty of the permittee to comply with the provisions of this Section.
    (l) The Agency may establish procedures for the collection of air pollution construction permit fees.
    (m) Fees collected pursuant to this Section shall be deposited into the Environmental Protection Permit and Inspection Fund.
(Source: P.A. 99-463, eff. 1-1-16.)

415 ILCS 5/9.13

    (415 ILCS 5/9.13)
    Sec. 9.13. Asbestos fees.
    (a) For any site for which the owner or operator must file an original 10-day notice of intent to renovate or demolish pursuant to 40 CFR 61.145(b) (part of the federal asbestos National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants or NESHAP), the owner or operator shall pay to the Agency with the filing of each 10-day Notice a fee of $150.
    (b) If demolition or renovation of a site has commenced without proper filing of the 10-day Notice, the fee is double the amount otherwise due. This doubling of the fee is in addition to any other penalties under this Act, the federal NESHAP, or otherwise, and does not preclude the Agency, the Attorney General, or other authorized persons from pursuing an enforcement action against the owner or operator for failure to file a 10-day Notice prior to commencing demolition or renovation activities.
    (c) In the event that an owner or operator makes a fee payment under this Section from an account with insufficient funds to cover the amount of the fee payment, the 10-day Notice shall be deemed improperly filed. The Agency shall so notify the owner or operator within 60 days of receiving the notice of insufficient funds. Failure of the Agency to so notify the owner or operator does not excuse or alter the duty of the owner or operator to comply with the requirements of this Section.
    (d) Where asbestos remediation or demolition activities have not been conducted in accordance with the asbestos NESHAP, in addition to the fees imposed by this Section, the Agency may also collect its actual costs incurred for asbestos-related activities at the site, including without limitation costs of sampling, sample analysis, remediation plan review, and activity oversight for demolition or renovation.
    (e) Fees and cost recovery amounts collected under this Section shall be deposited into the Environmental Protection Permit and Inspection Fund.
(Source: P.A. 93-32, eff. 7-1-03.)

415 ILCS 5/9.14

    (415 ILCS 5/9.14)
    Sec. 9.14. Registration of smaller sources.
    (a) After the effective date of rules implementing this Section, the owner or operator of an eligible source shall annually register with the Agency instead of complying with the requirement to obtain an air pollution construction or operating permit under this Act. The criteria for determining an eligible source shall include the following:
        (1) the source must not be required to obtain a
    
permit pursuant to the Illinois Clean Air Act Permit Program or Federally Enforceable State Operating Permit program, or under regulations promulgated pursuant to Section 111 or 112 of the Clean Air Act;
        (2) the USEPA has not otherwise determined that a
    
permit is required;
        (3) the source emits less than an actual 5 tons per
    
year of combined particulate matter, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic material air pollutant emissions;
        (4) the source emits less than an actual 0.5 tons per
    
year of combined hazardous air pollutant emissions;
        (5) the source emits less than an actual 0.05 tons
    
per year of lead air emissions;
        (6) the source emits less than an actual 0.05 tons
    
per year of mercury air emissions; and
        (7) the source does not have an emission unit subject
    
to a standard pursuant to 40 CFR Part 61 Maximum Achievable Control Technology, or 40 CFR Part 63 National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants other than those regulations that the USEPA has categorized as "area source".
    (b) Complete registration of an eligible source, including payment of the required fee as specified in subsection (c) of this Section, shall provide the owner or operator of the eligible source with an exemption from the requirement to obtain an air pollution construction or operating permit under this Act. The registration of smaller sources program does not relieve an owner or operator from the obligation to comply with any other applicable rules or regulations.
    (c) The owner or operator of an eligible source shall pay an annual registration fee of $235 to the Agency at the time of registration submittal and each year thereafter. Fees collected under this Section shall be deposited into the Environmental Protection Permit and Inspection Fund.
    (d) The Agency shall propose rules to implement the registration of smaller sources program. Within 120 days after the Agency proposes those rules, the Board shall adopt rules to implement the registration of smaller sources program. These rules may be subsequently amended from time to time pursuant to a proposal filed with the Board by any person, and any necessary amendments shall be adopted by the Board within 120 days after proposal. Such amendments may provide for the alteration or revision of the initial criteria included in subsection (a) of this Section.
(Source: P.A. 97-95, eff. 7-12-11; 97-1081, eff. 8-24-12.)

415 ILCS 5/9.15

    (415 ILCS 5/9.15)
    Sec. 9.15. Greenhouse gases.
    (a) An air pollution construction permit shall not be required due to emissions of greenhouse gases if the equipment, site, or source is not subject to regulation, as defined by 40 CFR 52.21, as now or hereafter amended, for greenhouse gases. This exemption does not relieve an owner or operator from the obligation to comply with other applicable rules or regulations.
    (b) An air pollution operating permit shall not be required due to emissions of greenhouse gases if the equipment, site, or source is not subject to regulation, as defined by Section 39.5 of this Act, for greenhouse gases. This exemption does not relieve an owner or operator from the obligation to comply with other applicable rules or regulations.
    (c) Notwithstanding any provision to the contrary in this Section, an air pollution construction or operating permit shall not be required due to emissions of greenhouse gases if any of the following events occur:
        (1) enactment of federal legislation depriving the
    
Administrator of the USEPA of authority to regulate greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act;
        (2) the issuance of any opinion, ruling, judgment,
    
order, or decree by a federal court depriving the Administrator of the USEPA of authority to regulate greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act; or
        (3) action by the President of the United States or
    
the President's authorized agent, including the Administrator of the USEPA, to repeal or withdraw the Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule (75 Fed. Reg. 31514, June 3, 2010).
    This subsection (c) does not relieve an owner or operator from the obligation to comply with applicable rules or regulations other than those relating to greenhouse gases.
    (d) If any event listed in subsection (c) of this Section occurs, permits issued after such event shall not impose permit terms or conditions addressing greenhouse gases during the effectiveness of any event listed in subsection (c).
    (e) If an event listed in subsection (c) of this Section occurs, any owner or operator with a permit that includes terms or conditions addressing greenhouse gases may elect to submit an application to the Agency to address a revision or repeal of such terms or conditions. The Agency shall expeditiously process such permit application in accordance with applicable laws and regulations.
(Source: P.A. 97-95, eff. 7-12-11.)

415 ILCS 5/10

    (415 ILCS 5/10) (from Ch. 111 1/2, par. 1010)
    Sec. 10. Regulations.
    (A) The Board, pursuant to procedures prescribed in Title VII of this Act, may adopt regulations to promote the purposes of this Title. Without limiting the generality of this authority, such regulations may among other things prescribe:
        (a) (Blank);
        (b) Emission standards specifying the maximum amounts
    
or concentrations of various contaminants that may be discharged into the atmosphere;
        (c) Standards for the issuance of permits for
    
construction, installation, or operation of any equipment, facility, vehicle, vessel, or aircraft capable of causing or contributing to air pollution or designed to prevent air pollution;
        (d) Standards and conditions regarding the sale,
    
offer, or use of any fuel, vehicle, or other article determined by the Board to constitute an air-pollution hazard;
        (e) Alert and abatement standards relative to
    
air-pollution episodes or emergencies constituting an acute danger to health or to the environment;
        (f) Requirements and procedures for the inspection of
    
any equipment, facility, vehicle, vessel, or aircraft that may cause or contribute to air pollution;
        (g) Requirements and standards for equipment and
    
procedures for monitoring contaminant discharges at their sources, the collection of samples and the collection, reporting and retention of data resulting from such monitoring.
    (B) The Board may adopt regulations and emission standards that are applicable or that may become applicable to stationary emission sources located in all areas of the State in accordance with any of the following:
        (1) that are required by federal law;
        (2) that are otherwise part of the State's attainment
    
plan and are necessary to attain the national ambient air quality standards; or
        (3) that are necessary to comply with the
    
requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.
    (C) The Board may not adopt any regulation banning the burning of landscape waste throughout the State generally. The Board may, by regulation, restrict or prohibit the burning of landscape waste within any geographical area of the State if it determines based on medical and biological evidence generally accepted by the scientific community that such burning will produce in the atmosphere of that geographical area contaminants in sufficient quantities and of such characteristics and duration as to be injurious to humans, plant, or animal life, or health.
    (D) The Board shall adopt regulations requiring the owner or operator of a gasoline dispensing system that dispenses more than 10,000 gallons of gasoline per month to install and operate a system for the recovery of gasoline vapor emissions arising from the fueling of motor vehicles that meets the requirements of Section 182 of the federal Clean Air Act (42 USC 7511a). These regulations shall apply only in areas of the State that are classified as moderate, serious, severe or extreme nonattainment areas for ozone pursuant to Section 181 of the federal Clean Air Act (42 USC 7511), but shall not apply in such areas classified as moderate nonattainment areas for ozone if the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgates standards for vehicle-based (onboard) systems for the control of vehicle refueling emissions pursuant to Section 202(a)(6) of the federal Clean Air Act (42 USC 7521(a)(6)) by November 15, 1992.
    (E) The Board shall not adopt or enforce any regulation requiring the use of a tarpaulin or other covering on a truck, trailer, or other vehicle that is stricter than the requirements of Section 15-109.1 of the Illinois Vehicle Code. To the extent that it is in conflict with this subsection, the Board's rule codified as 35 Ill. Admin. Code, Section 212.315 is hereby superseded.
    (F) Any person who prior to June 8, 1988, has filed a timely Notice of Intent to Petition for an Adjusted RACT Emissions Limitation and who subsequently timely files a completed petition for an adjusted RACT emissions limitation pursuant to 35 Ill. Adm. Code, Part 215, Subpart I, shall be subject to the procedures contained in Subpart I but shall be excluded by operation of law from 35 Ill. Adm. Code, Part 215, Subparts PP, QQ and RR, including the applicable definitions in 35 Ill. Adm. Code, Part 211. Such persons shall instead be subject to a separate regulation which the Board is hereby authorized to adopt pursuant to the adjusted RACT emissions limitation procedure in 35 Ill. Adm. Code, Part 215, Subpart I. In its final action on the petition, the Board shall create a separate rule which establishes Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) for such person. The purpose of this procedure is to create separate and independent regulations for purposes of SIP submittal, review, and approval by USEPA.
    (G) Subpart FF of Subtitle B, Title 35 Ill. Adm. Code, Sections 218.720 through 218.730 and Sections 219.720 through 219.730, are hereby repealed by operation of law and are rendered null and void and of no force and effect.
    (H) In accordance with subsection (b) of Section 7.2, the Board shall adopt ambient air quality standards specifying the maximum permissible short-term and long-term concentrations of various contaminants in the atmosphere; those standards shall be identical in substance to the national ambient air quality standards promulgated by the Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency in accordance with Section 109 of the Clean Air Act. The Board may consolidate into a single rulemaking under this subsection all such federal regulations adopted within a period of time not to exceed 6 months. The provisions and requirements of Title VII of this Act and Section 5-35 of the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act, relating to procedures for rulemaking, shall not apply to identical in substance regulations adopted pursuant to this subsection. However, the Board shall provide for notice and public comment before adopted rules are filed with the Secretary of State. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to limit the right of any person to submit a proposal to the Board, or the authority of the Board to adopt, air quality standards more stringent than the standards promulgated by the Administrator, pursuant to the rulemaking requirements of Title VII of this Act and Section 5-35 of the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act.
(Source: P.A. 97-945, eff. 8-10-12.)