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Illinois Compiled Statutes

Information maintained by the Legislative Reference Bureau
Updating the database of the Illinois Compiled Statutes (ILCS) is an ongoing process. Recent laws may not yet be included in the ILCS database, but they are found on this site as Public Acts soon after they become law. For information concerning the relationship between statutes and Public Acts, refer to the Guide.

Because the statute database is maintained primarily for legislative drafting purposes, statutory changes are sometimes included in the statute database before they take effect. If the source note at the end of a Section of the statutes includes a Public Act that has not yet taken effect, the version of the law that is currently in effect may have already been removed from the database and you should refer to that Public Act to see the changes made to the current law.

PUBLIC SAFETY
(430 ILCS 69/) Reimagine Public Safety Act.

430 ILCS 69/3-5

    (430 ILCS 69/3-5)
    Sec. 3-5. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-10

    (430 ILCS 69/3-10)
    Sec. 3-10. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-15

    (430 ILCS 69/3-15)
    Sec. 3-15. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-20

    (430 ILCS 69/3-20)
    Sec. 3-20. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-30

    (430 ILCS 69/3-30)
    Sec. 3-30. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-35

    (430 ILCS 69/3-35)
    Sec. 3-35. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-40

    (430 ILCS 69/3-40)
    Sec. 3-40. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-45

    (430 ILCS 69/3-45)
    Sec. 3-45. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-46

    (430 ILCS 69/3-46)
    Sec. 3-46. The State Finance Act is amended by repealing Section 5.414.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/3-50

    (430 ILCS 69/3-50)
    Sec. 3-50. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-55

    (430 ILCS 69/3-55)
    Sec. 3-55. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-60

    (430 ILCS 69/3-60)
    Sec. 3-60. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-65

    (430 ILCS 69/3-65)
    Sec. 3-65. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-70

    (430 ILCS 69/3-70)
    Sec. 3-70. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-75

    (430 ILCS 69/3-75)
    Sec. 3-75. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-80

    (430 ILCS 69/3-80)
    Sec. 3-80. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-85

    (430 ILCS 69/3-85)
    Sec. 3-85. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-90

    (430 ILCS 69/3-90)
    Sec. 3-90. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-95

    (430 ILCS 69/3-95)
    Sec. 3-95. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-100

    (430 ILCS 69/3-100)
    Sec. 3-100. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-105

    (430 ILCS 69/3-105)
    Sec. 3-105. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-110

    (430 ILCS 69/3-110)
    Sec. 3-110. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-115

    (430 ILCS 69/3-115)
    Sec. 3-115. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-120

    (430 ILCS 69/3-120)
    Sec. 3-120. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-125

    (430 ILCS 69/3-125)
    Sec. 3-125. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-130

    (430 ILCS 69/3-130)
    Sec. 3-130. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-135

    (430 ILCS 69/3-135)
    Sec. 3-135. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/3-140

    (430 ILCS 69/3-140)
    Sec. 3-140. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 1

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 1 heading)
ARTICLE 1. SHORT TITLE; PURPOSE
(Uncodified provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 2

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 2 heading)
ARTICLE 2. STATE FINANCE ACT AMENDMENTS AFFECTING THE FISCAL YEAR 2022 BUDGET
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 3

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 3 heading)
ARTICLE 3. AMENDMENTS TO MISCELLANEOUS ACTS AFFECTING THE FISCAL YEAR 2022 BUDGET
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 4

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 4 heading)
ARTICLE 4. AUDIT EXPENSE FUND
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 5

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 5 heading)
ARTICLE 5. GRADE CROSSING PROTECTION
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 6

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 6 heading)
ARTICLE 6. SPORTS FACILITIES AUTHORITY
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 7

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 7 heading)
ARTICLE 7. LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 8

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 8 heading)
ARTICLE 8. INVEST IN KIDS
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 9

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 9 heading)
ARTICLE 9. STATE TREASURER'S CAPITAL FUND
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 10

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 10 heading)
ARTICLE 10. AMENDATORY PROVISIONS
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 11

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 11 heading)
ARTICLE 11. EDGE CREDIT
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 12

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 12 heading)
ARTICLE 12. PENSION CODE
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 14

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 14 heading)
ARTICLE 14. LIHEAP
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 20

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 20 heading)
ARTICLE 20. AMENDATORY PROVISIONS
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 25

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 25 heading)
ARTICLE 25. HORSE RACING PURSE EQUITY FUND
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 30

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 30 heading)
ARTICLE 30. REVENUE
(Amendatory provisions; text omitted)
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 35

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 35 heading)
ARTICLE 35. REIMAGINE PUBLIC SAFETY
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-1

    (430 ILCS 69/35-1)
    Sec. 35-1. Short title. This Act may be cited as the Reimagine Public Safety Act.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-5

    (430 ILCS 69/35-5)
    Sec. 35-5. Intent; purposes. This Act creates a comprehensive approach to ending Illinois' firearm violence epidemic. Furthermore, the Act reduces significant gaps in Illinois' mental health treatment system for youth, young adults, and families that live in areas with chronic exposure to firearm violence and exhibit mental health conditions associated with chronic and ongoing trauma.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-10

    (430 ILCS 69/35-10)
    Sec. 35-10. Definitions. As used in this Act:
    "Approved technical assistance and training provider" means an organization that has experience in improving the outcomes of local community-based organizations by providing supportive services that address the gaps in their resources and knowledge about content-based work or provide support and knowledge about the administration and management of organizations, or both. Approved technical assistance and training providers as defined in this Act are intended to assist community organizations with evaluating the need for evidence-based violence prevention services, promising violence prevention programs, starting up programming, and strengthening the quality of existing programming.
    "Community" or "communities" means, for municipalities with a 1,000,000 or more population in Illinois, the 77 designated neighborhood areas defined by the University of Chicago Social Science Research Committee as amended in 1980.
    "Concentrated firearm violence" means the 10 most violent communities in Illinois municipalities with 1,000,000 or more residents and the 10 most violent municipalities with less than 1,000,000 residents and greater than 35,000 residents with the most per capita fatal and nonfatal firearm-shot victims, excluding self-inflicted incidents, from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2020.
    "Criminal and juvenile justice-involved" means an individual who has been arrested, indicted, convicted, adjudicated delinquent, or otherwise detained by criminal or juvenile justice authorities for violation of Illinois criminal laws.
    "Evidence-based high-risk youth intervention services" means programs that have been proven to reduce involvement in the criminal or juvenile justice system, increase school attendance, and includes referrals of high-risk teens into therapeutic programs that address trauma recovery and other mental health improvements based on best practices in the youth intervention services field.
    "Evidence-based violence prevention services" means coordinated programming and services that may include, but are not limited to, effective emotional or trauma related therapies, housing, employment training, job placement, family engagement, or wrap-around support services that have been proven effective or are considered to be best practice for reducing violence within the field of violence intervention research and practice.
    "Evidence-based youth development programs" means after-school and summer programming that provides services to teens to increase their school attendance, school performance, reduce involvement in the criminal justice system, and develop nonacademic interests that build social emotional persistence and intelligence based on best practices in the field of youth development services for high-risk youth.
    "Options school" means a secondary school where 75% or more of attending students have either stopped attending or failed their secondary school courses since first attending ninth grade.
    "Violence prevention organization" means an organization that manages and employs qualified violence prevention professionals.
    "Violence prevention professional" means a community health worker who renders violence preventive services.
    "Social organization" means an organization of individuals who form the organization for the purposes of enjoyment, work, and other mutual interests.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; 102-679, eff. 12-10-21; 102-687, eff. 12-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-15

    (430 ILCS 69/35-15)
    Sec. 35-15. Findings. The Illinois General Assembly finds that:
        (1) Discrete neighborhoods in municipalities across
    
Illinois are experiencing concentrated and perpetual firearm violence that is a public health epidemic.
        (2) Within neighborhoods experiencing this firearm
    
violence epidemic, violence is concentrated among teens and young adults that have chronic exposure to the risk of violence and criminal legal system involvement and related trauma in small geographic areas where these young people live or congregate.
        (3) Firearm violence victimization and perpetration
    
is highly concentrated in particular neighborhoods, particular blocks within these neighborhoods, and among a small number of individuals living in these areas.
        (4) People who are chronically exposed to the risk of
    
firearm violence victimization are substantially more likely to be violently injured or violently injure another person. People who have been violently injured are substantially more likely to be violently reinjured. Chronic exposure to violence additionally leads individuals to engage in behavior, as part of a cycle of community violence, trauma, and retaliation that substantially increases their own risk of violent injury or reinjury.
        (5) Evidence-based programs that engage individuals
    
at the highest risk of firearm violence and provide life stabilization, case management, and culturally competent group and individual therapy reduce firearm violence victimization and perpetration and can end Illinois' firearm violence epidemic.
        (6) A public health approach to ending Illinois'
    
firearm violence epidemic requires targeted, integrated behavioral health services and economic opportunity that promotes self-sufficiency for victims of firearm violence and those with chronic exposure to the risk of firearm violence victimization.
        (7) A public health approach to ending Illinois'
    
firearm violence epidemic further requires broader preventive investments in the census tracts and blocks that reduce risk factors for youth and families living in areas at the highest risk of firearm violence victimization.
        (8) A public health approach to ending Illinois'
    
firearm violence epidemic requires empowering residents and community-based organizations within impacted neighborhoods to provide culturally competent care based on lived experience in these areas and long-term relationships of mutual interest that promote safety and stability.
        (9) A public health approach to ending Illinois'
    
firearm violence epidemic further requires that preventive youth development services for youth in these neighborhoods be fully integrated with a team-based model of mental health care to address trauma recovery for those young people at the highest risk of firearm violence victimization.
        (10) Community revitalization can be an effective
    
violence prevention strategy, provided that revitalization is targeted to the highest risk geographies within communities and revitalization efforts are designed and led by individuals living and working in the impacted communities.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; 102-679, eff. 12-10-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-20

    (430 ILCS 69/35-20)
    Sec. 35-20. Office of Firearm Violence Prevention.
    (a) On or before October 1, 2021, an Office of Firearm Violence Prevention is established within the Illinois Department of Human Services. The Assistant Secretary of Violence Prevention shall report his or her actions to the Secretary of Human Services and the Office of the Governor. The Office shall have the authority to coordinate and integrate all programs and services listed in this Act and other programs and services the Governor establishes by executive order to maximize an integrated approach to reducing Illinois' firearm violence epidemic and ultimately ending this public health crisis.
    (b) The Department of Human Services and the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall have grant making, operational, and procurement authority to distribute funds to violence prevention organizations, youth development organizations, high-risk youth intervention organizations, approved technical assistance and training providers, evaluation and assessment organizations, and other entities necessary to execute the functions established in this Act and other programs and services the Governor establishes by executive order for the Department and the Office.
    (c) The Assistant Secretary of Firearm Violence Prevention shall be appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Assistant Secretary of Firearm Violence Prevention shall report to the Secretary of Human Services and also report his or her actions to the Office of the Governor.
    (d) For Illinois municipalities with a 1,000,000 or more population, the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall determine the 10 most violent neighborhoods. When possible, this shall be determined by measuring the number of per capita fatal and nonfatal firearm-shot victims, excluding self-inflicted incidents, from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2020. These 10 communities shall qualify for grants under this Act and coordination of other State services from the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention. The Office shall, after identifying the top 10 neighborhoods, identify an additional 7 eligible neighborhoods by considering the number of victims in rank order in addition to the per capita rate. If appropriate, and subject to appropriation, the Office shall have the authority to consider adding up to 5 additional eligible neighborhoods or clusters of contiguous neighborhoods utilizing the same data sets so as to maximize the potential impact for firearm violence reduction. For Illinois municipalities with less than 1,000,000 residents and more than 35,000 residents, the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall identify the 10 municipalities or contiguous geographic areas that have the greatest concentrated firearm violence victims. When possible, this shall be determined by measuring the number of fatal and nonfatal firearm-shot victims, excluding self-inflicted incidents, from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2020 divided by the number of residents for each municipality or area. These 10 municipalities or contiguous geographic areas and up to 5 additional municipalities or contiguous geographic areas identified by the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall qualify for grants under this Act and coordination of other State services from the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention. The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall consider factors listed in subsection (a) of Section 35-40 to determine up to 5 additional municipalities or contiguous geographic areas that qualify for grants under this Act. The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention may, subject to appropriation, identify up to 5 additional neighborhoods, municipalities, contiguous geographic areas, or other local government-identified boundary areas to receive funding under this Act after considering additional risk factors that contribute to community firearm violence. The data analysis to identify new eligible neighborhoods and municipalities shall be updated to reflect eligibility based on the most recently available 5 full years of data no more frequently than once every 3 years.
    (e) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall issue a report to the General Assembly no later than January 1 of each year that identifies communities within Illinois municipalities of 1,000,000 or more residents and municipalities with less than 1,000,000 residents and more than 35,000 residents that are experiencing concentrated firearm violence, explaining the investments that are being made to reduce concentrated firearm violence, and making further recommendations on how to end Illinois' firearm violence epidemic.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; 102-679, eff. 12-10-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-25

    (430 ILCS 69/35-25)
    Sec. 35-25. Integrated violence prevention and other services.
    (a) Subject to appropriation, for municipalities with 1,000,000 or more residents, the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall make grants to violence prevention organizations for evidence-based violence prevention services. Approved technical assistance and training providers shall create learning communities for the exchange of information between community-based organizations in the same or similar fields. Firearm violence prevention organizations shall prioritize individuals at the highest risk of firearm violence victimization and provide these individuals with evidence-based comprehensive services that reduce their exposure to chronic firearm violence.
    (b) Violence prevention organizations shall develop the following expertise in the geographic areas that they cover:
        (1) Analyzing and leveraging data to identify the
    
individuals who will most benefit from evidence-based violence prevention services in their geographic areas.
        (2) Identifying the conflicts that are responsible
    
for recurring violence.
        (3) Having relationships with individuals who are
    
most able to reduce conflicts.
        (4) Addressing the stabilization and trauma recovery
    
needs of individuals impacted by violence by providing direct services for their unmet needs or referring them to other qualified service providers.
        (5) Having and building relationships with community
    
members and community organizations that provide evidence-based violence prevention services and get referrals of people who will most benefit from evidence-based violence prevention services in their geographic areas.
        (6) Providing training and technical assistance to
    
local law enforcement agencies to improve their effectiveness without having any role, requirement, or mandate to participate in the policing, enforcement, or prosecution of any crime.
    (c) Violence prevention organizations receiving grants under this Act shall coordinate services with other violence prevention organizations in their area.
    (d) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall identify, for each separate eligible service area under this Act, an experienced violence prevention organization to serve as the Lead Violence Prevention Convener for that area and provide each with a grant of up to $100,000 to these organizations to coordinate monthly meetings between violence prevention organizations and youth development organizations under this Act. The Lead Violence Prevention Convener may also receive, from the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention, technical assistance or training through approved providers when needs are jointly identified. The Lead Violence Prevention Convener shall:
        (1) provide the convened organizations with summary
    
notes recommendations made at the monthly meetings to improve the effectiveness of evidence-based violence prevention services based on review of timely data on shootings and homicides in his or her relevant neighborhood;
        (2) attend monthly meetings where the cause of
    
violence and other neighborhood disputes is discussed and strategize on how to resolve ongoing conflicts and execute on agreed plans;
        (3) (blank);
        (4) on behalf of the convened organizations, make
    
consensus recommendations to the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention and local law enforcement on how to reduce violent conflict in his or her neighborhood;
        (5) meet on an emergency basis when conflicts that
    
need immediate attention and resolution arise;
        (6) share knowledge and strategies of the community
    
violence dynamic in monthly meetings with local youth development specialists receiving grants under this Act;
        (7) select when and where needed an approved Office
    
of Violence Prevention-funded technical assistance and training service provider to receive agreed upon services; and
        (8) after meeting with community residents and other
    
community organizations that have expertise in housing, mental health, economic development, education, and social services, make recommendations to the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention on how to target community revitalization resources available from federal and State funding sources.
    The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall compile recommendations from all Lead Violence Prevention Conveners and report to the General Assembly bi-annually on these funding recommendations. The Lead Violence Prevention Convener may also serve as a youth development provider.
    (e) The Illinois Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall select, when possible and appropriate, no fewer than 2 and no more than 3 approved technical assistance and training providers to deliver technical assistance and training to the violence prevention organizations that request to receive approved technical assistance and training. Violence prevention organizations shall have complete authority to select among the approved technical assistance services providers funded by the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention.
    (f) Approved technical assistance and training providers may:
        (1) provide training and certification to violence
    
prevention professionals on how to perform violence prevention services and other professional development to violence prevention professionals.
        (2) provide management training on how to manage
    
violence prevention professionals;
        (3) provide training and assistance on how to develop
    
memorandum of understanding for referral services or create approved provider lists for these referral services, or both;
        (4) share lessons learned among violence prevention
    
professionals and service providers in their network; and
        (5) provide technical assistance and training on
    
human resources, grants management, capacity building, and fiscal management strategies.
    (g) Approved technical assistance and training providers shall:
        (1) provide additional services identified as
    
necessary by the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention and service providers in their network; and
        (2) receive a base grant of up to $250,000 plus
    
negotiated service rates to provide group and individualized services to participating violence prevention organizations.
    (h) (Blank).
    (i) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall issue grants, when possible and appropriate, to no fewer than 2 violence prevention organizations in each of the eligible service areas and no more than 6 organizations. When possible, grants shall be for no less than $300,000 per violence prevention organization. The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention may establish grant award ranges to ensure grants will have the potential to reduce violence in each neighborhood.
    (j) No violence prevention organization can serve more than 3 eligible service areas unless the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention is unable to identify violence prevention organizations to provide adequate coverage.
    (k) No approved technical assistance and training provider shall provide evidence-based violence prevention services in an eligible service area under this Act unless the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention is unable to identify qualified violence prevention organizations to provide adequate coverage.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; 102-679, eff. 12-10-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-30

    (430 ILCS 69/35-30)
    Sec. 35-30. Integrated youth services.
    (a) Subject to appropriation, for municipalities with 1,000,000 or more residents, the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall make grants to youth development organizations for evidence-based youth after-school and summer programming. Evidence-based youth development programs shall provide services to teens that increase their school attendance, school performance, reduce involvement in the criminal and juvenile justice systems, and develop nonacademic interests that build social emotional persistence and intelligence.
    (b) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall identify municipal blocks where more than 35% of all fatal and nonfatal firearm-shot incidents take place and focus youth development service grants to residents of these identified blocks in the designated eligible service areas. The Department of Human Services shall prioritize funding to youth development service programs that serve the following teens before expanding services to the broader community:
        (1) criminal and juvenile justice-involved youth;
        (2) students who are attending or have attended
    
option schools;
        (3) family members of individuals working with
    
violence prevention organizations; and
        (4) youth living on the blocks where more than 35% of
    
the violence takes place in a neighborhood.
    (c) Each program participant enrolled in a youth development program under this Act, when possible and appropriate, shall receive an individualized needs assessment to determine if the participant requires intensive youth services as provided for in Section 35-35 of this Act. The needs assessment should be the best available instrument that considers the physical and mental condition of each youth based on the youth's family ties, financial resources, past substance use, criminal justice involvement, and trauma related to chronic exposure to firearm violence behavioral health assessment to determine the participant's broader support and mental health needs. The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall determine best practices for referring program participants who are at the highest risk of violence and justice involvement to be referred to a high-risk youth intervention program established in Section 35-35.
    (d) Youth development prevention program participants shall receive services designed to empower participants with the social and emotional skills necessary to forge paths of healthy development and disengagement from high-risk behaviors. Within the context of engaging social, physical, and personal development activities, participants should build resilience and the skills associated with healthy social, emotional, and identity development.
    (e) Youth development providers shall develop the following expertise in the geographic areas they cover:
        (1) Knowledge of the teens and their social
    
organization in the blocks they are designated to serve.
        (2) Youth development organizations receiving grants
    
under this Act shall be required to coordinate services with other youth development organizations in their neighborhood by sharing lessons learned in monthly meetings.
        (3) (Blank).
        (4) Meeting on an emergency basis when conflicts
    
related to program participants that need immediate attention and resolution arise.
        (5) Sharing knowledge and strategies of the
    
neighborhood violence dynamic in monthly meetings with local violence prevention organizations receiving grants under this Act.
        (6) Selecting an approved technical assistance and
    
training service provider to receive agreed upon services.
    (f) The Illinois Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall select, when possible and appropriate, no fewer than 2 and no more than 3 approved technical assistance and training providers to deliver technical assistance and training to the youth development organizations that request to receive approved technical assistance and training. Youth development organizations must use an approved technical assistance and training provider but have complete authority to select among the approved technical assistance services providers funded by the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention.
    (g) Approved technical assistance and training providers may:
        (1) provide training to youth development workers on
    
how to perform outreach services;
        (2) provide management training on how to manage
    
youth development workers;
        (3) provide training and assistance on how to develop
    
memorandum of understanding for referral services or create approved provider lists for these referral services, or both;
        (4) share lessons learned among youth development
    
service providers in their network; and
        (5) provide technical assistance and training on
    
human resources, grants management, capacity building, and fiscal management strategies.
    (h) Approved technical assistance and training providers shall:
        (1) provide additional services identified as
    
necessary by the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention and youth development service providers in their network; and
        (2) receive an annual base grant of up to $250,000
    
plus negotiated service rates to provide group and individualized services to participating youth development service organizations.
    (i) (Blank).
    (j) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall issue youth development services grants, when possible and appropriate, to no fewer than 4 youth services organizations in each of the eligible service areas and no more than 8 organizations. When possible, grants shall be for no less than $300,000 per youth development organization. The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention may establish award ranges to ensure grants will have the potential to reduce violence in each neighborhood.
    (k) No youth development organization can serve more than 3 eligible service areas unless the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention is unable to identify youth development organizations to provide adequate coverage.
    (l) No approved technical assistance and training provider shall provide youth development services in any neighborhood under this Act.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; 102-679, eff. 12-10-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-35

    (430 ILCS 69/35-35)
    Sec. 35-35. Intensive youth intervention services.
    (a) Subject to appropriation, for municipalities with 1,000,000 or more residents, the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall issue grants to high-risk youth intervention organizations for evidence-based intervention services that reduce involvement in the criminal and juvenile justice system, increase school attendance, and refer high-risk teens into therapeutic programs that address trauma recovery and other mental health improvements. Each program participant enrolled in a high-risk youth intervention program under this Act shall receive a nationally recognized comprehensive mental health assessment delivered by a qualified mental health professional certified to provide services to Medicaid recipients.
    (b) High-risk youth intervention program participants shall receive needed services as determined by the individualized assessment which may include, but is not limited to:
        (1) receive group-based emotional regulation therapy
    
that helps them control their emotions and understand how trauma and stress impacts their thinking and behavior; and
        (2) have youth advocates that accompany them to their
    
group therapy sessions, assist them with issues that prevent them from attending school, and address life skills development activities through weekly coaching.
    (b-5) High-risk youth intervention service organizations shall have trained clinical staff managing the youth advocate interface with program participants.
    (c) Youth development service organizations shall be assigned to the youth intervention service providers for referrals by the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention.
    (d) The youth receiving intervention services who are evaluated to need trauma recovery and other behavioral health interventions and who have the greatest risk of firearm violence victimization shall be referred to the family systems intervention services established in Section 35-55.
    (e) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall issue high-risk youth intervention grants, when possible and appropriate, to no less than 2 youth intervention organizations and no more than 4 organizations in municipalities with 1,000,000 or more residents.
    (f) No high-risk youth intervention organization can serve more than 13 eligible service areas.
    (g) The approved technical assistance and training providers for youth development programs provided in subsection (d) of Section 35-30 shall also provide technical assistance and training to the affiliated high-risk youth intervention service providers.
    (h) (Blank).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; 102-679, eff. 12-10-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-40

    (430 ILCS 69/35-40)
    Sec. 35-40. Services for municipalities with less than 1,000,000 residents.
    (a) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall identify the 10 municipalities or geographically contiguous areas in Illinois with less than 1,000,000 residents and more than 35,000 residents that have the largest concentration of fatal and nonfatal firearm-shot victims over the 5-year period considered for eligibility. These areas shall qualify for grants under this Act. The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention may identify up to 5 additional municipalities or geographically contiguous areas with less than 1,000,000 residents that would benefit from evidence-based violence prevention services. In identifying the additional municipalities that qualify for funding under Section 35-40, the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall consider the following factors when possible:
        (1) the total number of fatal and nonfatal firearms
    
victims, excluding self-inflicted incidents, in a potential municipality over the 5-year period considered for eligibility;
        (2) the per capita rate of fatal and nonfatal
    
firearms victims, excluding self-inflicted incidents, in a potential municipality over the 5-year period considered for eligibility; and
        (3) the total potential firearms violence reduction
    
benefit for the entire State of Illinois by serving the additional municipalities compared to the total benefit of investing in all other municipalities identified for grants to municipalities with more than 35,000 residents and less than 1,000,000 residents.
    (b) Resources for each of these areas shall be distributed based on a formula to be developed by the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention that will maximize the total potential reduction in firearms victimization for all municipalities receiving grants under this Act.
    (c) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall create local advisory councils for each of the designated service areas for the purpose of obtaining recommendations on how to distribute funds in these areas to reduce firearm violence incidents. Local advisory councils shall have a minimum of 5 members with the following expertise or experience:
        (1) a representative of a nonelected official in
    
local government from the designated area;
        (2) a representative of an elected official at the
    
local or state level for the area;
        (3) a representative with public health experience in
    
firearm violence prevention or youth development;
        (4) two residents of the subsection of each area with
    
the most concentrated firearm violence incidents; and
        (5) additional members as determined by the
    
individual local advisory council.
    (d) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall provide data to each local council on the characteristics of firearm violence in the designated area and other relevant information on the physical and demographic characteristics of the designated area. The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall also provide best available evidence on how to address the social determinants of health in the designated area in order to reduce firearm violence.
    (e) Each local advisory council shall make recommendations on how to allocate distributed resources for its area based on information provided to them by the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention, local law enforcement data, and other locally available data.
    (f) The Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall consider the recommendations and determine how to distribute funds through grants to community-based organizations and local governments. To the extent the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention does not follow a local advisory council's recommendation on allocation of funds, the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall explain in writing why a different allocation of resources is more likely to reduce firearm violence in the designated area.
    (g) Subject to appropriation, the Department of Human Services and the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall issue grants to local governmental agencies or community-based organizations, or both, to maximize firearm violence reduction each year. When possible, initial grants shall be named no later than April 1, 2022 and renewed or competitively bid as appropriate in subsequent fiscal years.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; 102-679, eff. 12-10-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-50

    (430 ILCS 69/35-50)
    Sec. 35-50. Medicaid trauma recovery services for adults.
    (a) On or before January 15, 2022, the Department of Healthcare and Family Services shall design, seek approval from the United States Department of Health and Human Services, and subject to federal approval and State appropriations for this purpose, implement a team-based model of care system to address trauma recovery from chronic exposure to firearm violence for Illinois adults.
    (b) The team-based model of care system shall reimburse for a minimum of the following services:
        (1) Outreach services that recruit trauma-exposed
    
adults into the system and develop supportive relationships with them based on lived experience in their communities. Outreach services include both services to support impacted individuals and group services that reduce violence between groups that need conflict resolution.
        (2) Case management and community support services
    
that provide stabilization to individuals recovering from chronic exposure to firearm violence, including group cognitive behavior therapy sessions and other evidence-based interventions that promote behavioral change.
        (3) Group and individual therapy that addresses
    
underlying mental health conditions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, substance use disorders, intermittent explosive disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and other mental conditions as a result of chronic trauma.
        (4) Services deemed necessary for the effective
    
integration of paragraphs (1), (2), and (3).
    (c) The Department of Healthcare and Family Services shall develop a reimbursement methodology.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-55

    (430 ILCS 69/35-55)
    Sec. 35-55. Medicaid trauma recovery services for children and youth.
    (a) On or before January 15, 2022, the Department of Healthcare and Family Services shall design, seek approval from the United States Department of Health and Human Services, and subject to federal approval and State appropriations for this purpose, implement a team-based model of care to address trauma recovery from chronic exposure to firearm violence for Illinois children and youth under the age of 19. Services for youth in care require additional support to maximize their effectiveness through the family systems model.
    (b) The team-based model of care shall reimburse for a minimum of the following services:
        (1) Outreach services that recruit trauma-exposed
    
children and youth into the system and develop supportive relationships with them based on lived experience in their communities.
        (2) Case management and school support services that
    
decrease truancy and criminal justice system involvement.
        (3) Group and individual therapy that addresses
    
underlying mental health conditions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, substance use disorders, intermittent explosive disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and other mental conditions as a result of chronic trauma.
        (4) An evidence-based family systems intervention
    
with proven results for reduction in anti-social behaviors.
        (5) Services deemed necessary for the effective
    
integration of paragraphs (1), (2), (3), and (4).
    (c) The Department of Healthcare and Family Services shall develop a reimbursement methodology.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-60

    (430 ILCS 69/35-60)
    Sec. 35-60. Rulemaking authority; emergency rulemaking authority. The General Assembly finds that exposure to chronic firearm violence qualifies for emergency rulemaking under Section 5-45 of the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act because exposure to chronic firearm violence is a situation that reasonably constitutes a threat to public interest, safety, and welfare. The Department of Healthcare and Family Services and the Office of Firearm Violence Prevention shall have rulemaking authority, including emergency rulemaking authority, as is necessary to implement all elements of this Act.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/35-105

    (430 ILCS 69/35-105)
    Sec. 35-105. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21; text omitted.)

430 ILCS 69/Art. 99

 
    (430 ILCS 69/Art. 99 heading)
ARTICLE 99. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/99-95

    (430 ILCS 69/99-95)
    Sec. 99-95. No acceleration or delay. Where this Act makes changes in a statute that is represented in this Act by text that is not yet or no longer in effect (for example, a Section represented by multiple versions), the use of that text does not accelerate or delay the taking effect of (i) the changes made by this Act or (ii) provisions derived from any other Public Act.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/99-97

    (430 ILCS 69/99-97)
    Sec. 99-97. Severability. The provisions of this Act are severable under Section 1.31 of the Statute on Statutes.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)

430 ILCS 69/99-99

    (430 ILCS 69/99-99)
    Sec. 99-99. Effective date. This Act takes effect upon becoming law.
(Source: P.A. 102-16, eff. 6-17-21.)