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Illinois Compiled Statutes

Information maintained by the Legislative Reference Bureau
Updating the database of the Illinois Compiled Statutes (ILCS) is an ongoing process. Recent laws may not yet be included in the ILCS database, but they are found on this site as Public Acts soon after they become law. For information concerning the relationship between statutes and Public Acts, refer to the Guide.

Because the statute database is maintained primarily for legislative drafting purposes, statutory changes are sometimes included in the statute database before they take effect. If the source note at the end of a Section of the statutes includes a Public Act that has not yet taken effect, the version of the law that is currently in effect may have already been removed from the database and you should refer to that Public Act to see the changes made to the current law.

EMPLOYMENT
(820 ILCS 112/) Equal Pay Act of 2003.

820 ILCS 112/1

    (820 ILCS 112/1)
    Sec. 1. Short Title. This Act may be cited as the Equal Pay Act of 2003.
(Source: P.A. 93-6, eff. 1-1-04.)

820 ILCS 112/5

    (820 ILCS 112/5)
    Sec. 5. Definitions. As used in this Act:
    "Director" means the Director of Labor.
    "Department" means the Department of Labor.
    "Employee" means any individual permitted to work by an employer.
    "Employer" means an individual, partnership, corporation, association, business, trust, person, or entity for whom employees are gainfully employed in Illinois and includes the State of Illinois, any state officer, department, or agency, any unit of local government, and any school district.
(Source: P.A. 99-418, eff. 1-1-16.)

820 ILCS 112/10

    (820 ILCS 112/10)
    (Text of Section before amendment by P.A. 102-277)
    Sec. 10. Prohibited acts.
    (a) No employer may discriminate between employees on the basis of sex by paying wages to an employee at a rate less than the rate at which the employer pays wages to another employee of the opposite sex for the same or substantially similar work on jobs the performance of which requires substantially similar skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions, except where the payment is made under:
        (1) a seniority system;
        (2) a merit system;
        (3) a system that measures earnings by quantity or
    
quality of production; or
        (4) a differential based on any other factor other
    
than: (i) sex or (ii) a factor that would constitute unlawful discrimination under the Illinois Human Rights Act, provided that the factor:
            (A) is not based on or derived from a
        
differential in compensation based on sex or another protected characteristic;
            (B) is job-related with respect to the position
        
and consistent with a business necessity; and
            (C) accounts for the differential.
    No employer may discriminate between employees by paying wages to an African-American employee at a rate less than the rate at which the employer pays wages to another employee who is not African-American for the same or substantially similar work on jobs the performance of which requires substantially similar skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions, except where the payment is made under:
        (1) a seniority system;
        (2) a merit system;
        (3) a system that measures earnings by quantity or
    
quality of production; or
        (4) a differential based on any other factor other
    
than: (i) race or (ii) a factor that would constitute unlawful discrimination under the Illinois Human Rights Act, provided that the factor:
            (A) is not based on or derived from a
        
differential in compensation based on race or another protected characteristic;
            (B) is job-related with respect to the position
        
and consistent with a business necessity; and
            (C) accounts for the differential.
    An employer who is paying wages in violation of this Act may not, to comply with this Act, reduce the wages of any other employee.
    Nothing in this Act may be construed to require an employer to pay, to any employee at a workplace in a particular county, wages that are equal to the wages paid by that employer at a workplace in another county to employees in jobs the performance of which requires equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions.
    (b) It is unlawful for any employer to interfere with, restrain, or deny the exercise of or the attempt to exercise any right provided under this Act. It is unlawful for any employer to discharge or in any other manner discriminate against any individual for inquiring about, disclosing, comparing, or otherwise discussing the employee's wages or the wages of any other employee, or aiding or encouraging any person to exercise his or her rights under this Act. It is unlawful for an employer to require an employee to sign a contract or waiver that would prohibit the employee from disclosing or discussing information about the employee's wages, salary, benefits, or other compensation. An employer may, however, prohibit a human resources employee, a supervisor, or any other employee whose job responsibilities require or allow access to other employees' wage or salary information from disclosing that information without prior written consent from the employee whose information is sought or requested.
    (b-5) It is unlawful for an employer or employment agency, or employee or agent thereof, to (1) screen job applicants based on their current or prior wages or salary histories, including benefits or other compensation, by requiring that the wage or salary history of an applicant satisfy minimum or maximum criteria, (2) request or require a wage or salary history as a condition of being considered for employment, as a condition of being interviewed, as a condition of continuing to be considered for an offer of employment, as a condition of an offer of employment or an offer of compensation, or (3) request or require that an applicant disclose wage or salary history as a condition of employment.
    (b-10) It is unlawful for an employer to seek the wage or salary history, including benefits or other compensation, of a job applicant from any current or former employer. This subsection (b-10) does not apply if:
        (1) the job applicant's wage or salary history is
    
a matter of public record under the Freedom of Information Act, or any other equivalent State or federal law, or is contained in a document completed by the job applicant's current or former employer and then made available to the public by the employer, or submitted or posted by the employer to comply with State or federal law; or
        (2) the job applicant is a current employee and
    
is applying for a position with the same current employer.
    (b-15) Nothing in subsections (b-5) and (b-10) shall be construed to prevent an employer or employment agency, or an employee or agent thereof, from:
        (1) providing information about the wages, benefits,
    
compensation, or salary offered in relation to a position; or
        (2) engaging in discussions with an applicant for
    
employment about the applicant's expectations with respect to wage or salary, benefits, and other compensation.
    (b-20) An employer is not in violation of subsections (b-5) and (b-10) when a job applicant voluntarily and without prompting discloses his or her current or prior wage or salary history, including benefits or other compensation, on the condition that the employer does not consider or rely on the voluntary disclosures as a factor in determining whether to offer a job applicant employment, in making an offer of compensation, or in determining future wages, salary, benefits, or other compensation.
    (c) It is unlawful for any person to discharge or in any other manner discriminate against any individual because the individual:
        (1) has filed any charge or has instituted or caused
    
to be instituted any proceeding under or related to this Act;
        (2) has given, or is about to give, any information
    
in connection with any inquiry or proceeding relating to any right provided under this Act;
        (3) has testified, or is about to testify, in any
    
inquiry or proceeding relating to any right provided under this Act; or
        (4) fails to comply with any wage or salary history
    
inquiry.
(Source: P.A. 100-1140, eff. 1-1-19; 101-177, eff. 9-29-19.)
 
    (Text of Section after amendment by P.A. 102-277)
    Sec. 10. Prohibited acts.
    (a) No employer may discriminate between employees on the basis of sex by paying wages to an employee at a rate less than the rate at which the employer pays wages to another employee of the opposite sex for the same or substantially similar work on jobs the performance of which requires substantially similar skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions, except where the payment is made under:
        (1) a seniority system;
        (2) a merit system;
        (3) a system that measures earnings by quantity or
    
quality of production; or
        (4) a differential based on any other factor other
    
than: (i) sex or (ii) a factor that would constitute unlawful discrimination under the Illinois Human Rights Act, provided that the factor:
            (A) is not based on or derived from a
        
differential in compensation based on sex or another protected characteristic;
            (B) is job-related with respect to the position
        
and consistent with a business necessity; and
            (C) accounts for the differential.
    No employer may discriminate between employees by paying wages to an African-American employee at a rate less than the rate at which the employer pays wages to another employee who is not African-American for the same or substantially similar work on jobs the performance of which requires substantially similar skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions, except where the payment is made under:
        (1) a seniority system;
        (2) a merit system;
        (3) a system that measures earnings by quantity or
    
quality of production; or
        (4) a differential based on any other factor other
    
than: (i) race or (ii) a factor that would constitute unlawful discrimination under the Illinois Human Rights Act, provided that the factor:
            (A) is not based on or derived from a
        
differential in compensation based on race or another protected characteristic;
            (B) is job-related with respect to the position
        
and consistent with a business necessity; and
            (C) accounts for the differential.
    An employer who is paying wages in violation of this Act may not, to comply with this Act, reduce the wages of any other employee.
    Nothing in this Act may be construed to require an employer to pay, to any employee at a workplace in a particular county, wages that are equal to the wages paid by that employer at a workplace in another county to employees in jobs the performance of which requires equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions.
    (b) It is unlawful for any employer to interfere with, restrain, or deny the exercise of or the attempt to exercise any right provided under this Act. It is unlawful for any employer to discharge or in any other manner discriminate against any individual for inquiring about, disclosing, comparing, or otherwise discussing the employee's wages or the wages of any other employee, or aiding or encouraging any person to exercise his or her rights under this Act. It is unlawful for an employer to require an employee to sign a contract or waiver that would prohibit the employee from disclosing or discussing information about the employee's wages, salary, benefits, or other compensation. An employer may, however, prohibit a human resources employee, a supervisor, or any other employee whose job responsibilities require or allow access to other employees' wage or salary information from disclosing that information without prior written consent from the employee whose information is sought or requested.
    (b-5) It is unlawful for an employer or employment agency, or employee or agent thereof, to (1) screen job applicants based on their current or prior wages or salary histories, including benefits or other compensation, by requiring that the wage or salary history of an applicant satisfy minimum or maximum criteria, (2) request or require a wage or salary history as a condition of being considered for employment, as a condition of being interviewed, as a condition of continuing to be considered for an offer of employment, as a condition of an offer of employment or an offer of compensation, or (3) request or require that an applicant disclose wage or salary history as a condition of employment.
    (b-10) It is unlawful for an employer to seek the wage or salary history, including benefits or other compensation, of a job applicant from any current or former employer. This subsection (b-10) does not apply if:
        (1) the job applicant's wage or salary history is
    
a matter of public record under the Freedom of Information Act, or any other equivalent State or federal law, or is contained in a document completed by the job applicant's current or former employer and then made available to the public by the employer, or submitted or posted by the employer to comply with State or federal law; or
        (2) the job applicant is a current employee and
    
is applying for a position with the same current employer.
    (b-15) Nothing in subsections (b-5) and (b-10) shall be construed to prevent an employer or employment agency, or an employee or agent thereof, from:
        (1) providing information about the wages, benefits,
    
compensation, or salary offered in relation to a position; or
        (2) engaging in discussions with an applicant for
    
employment about the applicant's expectations with respect to wage or salary, benefits, and other compensation, including unvested equity or deferred compensation that the applicant would forfeit or have canceled by virtue of the applicant's resignation from the applicant's current employer. If, during such discussion, the applicant voluntarily and without prompting discloses that the applicant would forfeit or have canceled by virtue of the applicant's resignation from the applicant's current employer unvested equity or deferred compensation, an employer may request the applicant to verify the aggregate amount of such compensation by submitting a letter or document stating the aggregate amount of the unvested equity or deferred compensation from, at the applicant's choice, one of the following: (1) the applicant's current employer or (2) the business entity that administers the funds that constitute the unvested equity or deferred compensation.
    (b-20) An employer is not in violation of subsections (b-5) and (b-10) when a job applicant voluntarily and without prompting discloses his or her current or prior wage or salary history, including benefits or other compensation, on the condition that the employer does not consider or rely on the voluntary disclosures as a factor in determining whether to offer a job applicant employment, in making an offer of compensation, or in determining future wages, salary, benefits, or other compensation.
    (c) It is unlawful for any person to discharge or in any other manner discriminate against any individual because the individual:
        (1) has filed any charge or has instituted or caused
    
to be instituted any proceeding under or related to this Act;
        (2) has given, or is about to give, any information
    
in connection with any inquiry or proceeding relating to any right provided under this Act;
        (3) has testified, or is about to testify, in any
    
inquiry or proceeding relating to any right provided under this Act; or
        (4) fails to comply with any wage or salary history
    
inquiry.
(Source: P.A. 101-177, eff. 9-29-19; 102-277, eff. 1-1-22.)

820 ILCS 112/11

    (820 ILCS 112/11)
    Sec. 11. Equal pay registration certificate requirements; application. For the purposes of this Section 11 only, "business" means any private employer who has more than 100 employees in the State of Illinois and is required to file an Annual Employer Information Report EEO-1 with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, but does not include the State of Illinois or any political subdivision, municipal corporation, or other governmental unit or agency.
    (a) A business must obtain an equal pay registration certificate from the Department.
    (b) Any business subject to the requirements of this Section that is authorized to transact business in this State on March 23, 2021 shall submit an application to obtain an equal pay registration certificate, between March 24, 2022 and March 23, 2024, and must recertify every 2 years thereafter. Any business subject to the requirements of this Section that is authorized to transact business in this State after March 23, 2021 must submit an application to obtain an equal pay registration certificate within 3 years of commencing business operations, but not before January 1, 2024, and must recertify every 2 years thereafter. The Department shall collect contact information from each business subject to this Section. The Department shall assign each business a date by which it must submit an application to obtain an equal pay registration certificate. The business shall recertify every 2 years at a date to be determined by the Department. When a business receives a notice from the Department to recertify for its equal pay registration certificate, if the business has fewer than 100 employees, the business must certify in writing to the Department that it is exempt from this Section. Any new business that is subject to this Section and authorized to conduct business in this State, after the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 102nd General Assembly, shall submit its contact information to the Department by January 1 of the following year and shall be assigned a date by which it must submit an application to obtain an equal pay registration certificate. The Department's failure to assign a business a registration date does not exempt the business from compliance with this Section. The failure of the Department to notify a business of its recertification deadline may be a mitigating factor when making a determination of a violation of this Section.
    (c) Application.
        (1) A business shall apply for an equal pay
    
registration certificate by paying a $150 filing fee and submitting wage records and an equal pay compliance statement to the Director as follows:
            (A) Wage Records. Any business that is required
        
to file an annual Employer Information Report EEO-1 with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission must also submit to the Director a copy of the business's most recently filed Employer Information Report EEO-1. The business shall also compile a list of all employees during the past calendar year, separated by gender and the race and ethnicity categories as reported in the business's most recently filed Employer Information Report EEO-1, and the county in which the employee works, the date the employee started working for the business, any other information the Department deems necessary to determine if pay equity exists among employees, and report the total wages as defined by Section 2 of the Illinois Wage Payment and Collection Act paid to each employee during the past calendar year, rounded to the nearest $100, to the Director.
            (B) Equal Pay Compliance Statement. The
        
business must submit a statement signed by a corporate officer, legal counsel, or authorized agent of the business certifying:
                (i) that the business is in compliance with
            
this Act and other relevant laws, including but not limited to: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the Illinois Human Rights Act, and the Equal Wage Act;
                (ii) that the average compensation for its
            
female and minority employees is not consistently below the average compensation, as determined by rule by the United States Department of Labor, for its male and non-minority employees within each of the major job categories in the Employer Information Report EEO-1 for which an employee is expected to perform work, taking into account factors such as length of service, requirements of specific jobs, experience, skill, effort, responsibility, working conditions of the job, education or training, job location, use of a collective bargaining agreement, or other mitigating factors; as used in this subparagraph, "minority" has the meaning ascribed to that term in paragraph (1) of subsection (A) of Section 2 of the Business Enterprise for Minorities, Women, and Persons with Disabilities Act;
                (iii) that the business does not restrict
            
employees of one sex to certain job classifications, and makes retention and promotion decisions without regard to sex;
                (iv) that wage and benefit disparities are
            
corrected when identified to ensure compliance with the Acts cited in item (i);
                (v) how often wages and benefits are
            
evaluated; and
                (vi) the approach the business takes in
            
determining what level of wages and benefits to pay its employees; acceptable approaches include, but are not limited to, a wage and salary survey.
            (C) Filing fee. The business shall pay to the
        
Department a filing fee of $150. Proceeds from the fees collected under this Section shall be deposited into the Equal Pay Registration Fund, a special fund created in the State treasury. Moneys in the Fund shall be appropriated to the Department for the purposes of this Section.
        (2) Receipt of the equal pay compliance application
    
and statement by the Director does not establish compliance with the Acts set forth in item (i) of subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1) of this subsection (c).
        (3) A business that has employees in multiple
    
locations or facilities in Illinois shall submit a single application to the Department regarding all of its operations in Illinois.
    (d) Issuance or rejection of registration certificate. After January 1, 2022, the Director must issue an equal pay registration certificate, or a statement of why the application was rejected, within 45 calendar days of receipt of the application. Applicants shall have the opportunity to cure any deficiencies in its application that led to the rejection, and re-submit the revised application to the Department within 30 calendar days of receiving a rejection. Applicants shall have the ability to appeal rejected applications. An application may be rejected only if it does not comply with the requirements of subsection (c), or the business is otherwise found to be in violation of this Act. The receipt of an application by the Department, or the issuance of a registration certificate by the Department, shall not establish compliance with the Equal Pay Act of 2003 as to all Sections except Section 11. The issuance of a registration certificate shall not be a defense against any Equal Pay Act violation found by the Department, nor a basis for mitigation of damages.
    (e) Revocation of registration certificate. An equal pay registration certificate for a business may be suspended or revoked by the Director when the business fails to make a good faith effort to comply with the Acts identified in item (i) of subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1) of subsection (c), fails to make a good faith effort to comply with this Section, or has multiple violations of this Section or the Acts identified in item (i) of subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1) of subsection (c). Prior to suspending or revoking a registration certificate, the Director must first have sought to conciliate with the business regarding wages and benefits due to employees.
    Consistent with Section 25, prior to or in connection with the suspension or revocation of an equal pay registration certificate, the Director, or his or her authorized representative, may interview workers, administer oaths, take or cause to be taken the depositions of witnesses, and require by subpoena the attendance and testimony of witnesses, and the production of personnel and compensation information relative to the matter under investigation, hearing or a department-initiated audit.
    Neither the Department nor the Director shall be held liable for good faith errors in issuing, denying, suspending or revoking certificates.
    (f) Administrative review. A business may obtain an administrative hearing in accordance with the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act before the suspension or revocation of its certificate or imposition of civil penalties as provided by subsection (i) is effective by filing a written request for hearing within 20 calendar days after service of notice by the Director.
    (g) Technical assistance. The Director must provide technical assistance to any business that requests assistance regarding this Section.
    (h) Access to data.
        (1) Any individually identifiable information
    
submitted to the Director within or related to an equal pay registration application or otherwise provided by an employer in its equal pay compliance statement under subsection (c) shall be considered confidential information and not subject to disclosure pursuant to the Illinois Freedom of Information Act. As used in this Section, "individually identifiable information" means data submitted pursuant to this Section that is associated with a specific person or business. Aggregate data or reports that are reasonably calculated to prevent the association of any data with any individual business or person are not confidential information. Aggregate data shall include the job category and the average hourly wage by county for each gender, race, and ethnicity category on the registration certificate applications. The Department of Labor may compile aggregate data from registration certificate applications.
        (2) The Director's decision to issue, not issue,
    
revoke, or suspend an equal pay registration certificate is public information.
        (3) Notwithstanding this subsection (h), a current
    
employee of a covered business may request anonymized data regarding their job classification or title and the pay for that classification. No individually identifiable information may be provided to an employee making a request under this paragraph.
        (4) Notwithstanding this subsection (h), the
    
Department may share data and identifiable information with the Department of Human Rights, pursuant to its enforcement of Article 2 of the Illinois Human Rights Act, or the Office of the Attorney General, pursuant to its enforcement of Section 10-104 of the Illinois Human Rights Act.
        (5) Any Department employee who willfully and
    
knowingly divulges, except in accordance with a proper judicial order or otherwise provided by law, confidential information received by the Department from any business pursuant to this Act shall be deemed to have violated the State Officials and Employees Ethics Act and be subject to the penalties established under subsections (e) and (f) of Section 50-5 of that Act after investigation and opportunity for hearing before the Executive Ethics Commission in accordance with Section 20-50 of that Act.
    (i) Penalty. Falsification or misrepresentation of information on an application submitted to the Department shall constitute a violation of this Act and the Department may seek to suspend or revoke an equal pay registration certificate or impose civil penalties as provided under subsection (c) of Section 30.
(Source: P.A. 101-656, eff. 3-23-21; 102-36, eff. 6-25-21.)

820 ILCS 112/15

    (820 ILCS 112/15)
    Sec. 15. Enforcement.
    (a) The Director or his or her authorized representative shall administer and enforce the provisions of this Act. The Director of Labor shall adopt rules necessary to administer and enforce this Act.
    (b) An employee or former employee may file a complaint with the Department alleging a violation of this Act by submitting a signed, completed complaint form. All complaints shall be filed with the Department within one year from the date of the underpayment.
    (c) The Department has the power to conduct investigations in connection with the administration and enforcement of this Act and the authorized officers and employees of the Department are authorized to investigate and gather data regarding the wages, hours, and other conditions and practices of employment in any industry subject to this Act, and may enter and inspect such places and such records at reasonable times during regular business hours, question the employees and investigate the facts, conditions, practices, or matters as he or she may deem necessary or appropriate to determine whether any person has violated any provision of this Act, or which may aid in the enforcement of this Act.
    (d) The Department may refer a complaint alleging a violation of this Act to the Department of Human Rights for investigation if the subject matter of the complaint also alleges a violation of the Illinois Human Rights Act and the Department of Human Rights has jurisdiction over the matter. When a complaint is referred to the Department of Human Rights under this subsection, the Department of Human Rights shall also file the complaint under the Illinois Human Rights Act and be the agency responsible for investigating the complaint. The Department shall review the Department of Human Rights' investigation and findings to determine whether a violation of this Act has occurred or whether further investigation by the Department is necessary and take any necessary or appropriate action required to enforce the provisions of this Act. The Director of Labor and the Department of Human Rights shall adopt joint rules necessary to administer and enforce this subsection.
(Source: P.A. 98-1051, eff. 1-1-15.)

820 ILCS 112/20

    (820 ILCS 112/20)
    Sec. 20. Recordkeeping requirements. An employer subject to any provision of this Act shall make and preserve records that document the name, address, and occupation of each employee, the wages paid to each employee, and any other information the Director may by rule deem necessary and appropriate for enforcement of this Act. An employer subject to any provision of this Act shall preserve those records for a period of not less than 5 years and shall make reports from the records as prescribed by rule or order of the Director, unless the records relate to an ongoing investigation or enforcement action under this Act, in which case the records must be maintained until their destruction is authorized by the Department or by court order.
(Source: P.A. 96-467, eff. 8-14-09.)

820 ILCS 112/25

    (820 ILCS 112/25)
    Sec. 25. Witnesses; subpoena. The Director of Labor or his or her authorized representative may administer oaths, take or cause to be taken the depositions of witnesses, and require by subpoena the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of all books, records, and other evidence relative to the matter under investigation. A subpoena issued under this Section shall be signed and issued by the Director of Labor or his or her authorized representative.
    In case of failure of any person to comply with any subpoena lawfully issued under this Section or on the refusal of any witness to produce evidence or to testify to any matter regarding which he or she may be lawfully interrogated, it is the duty of any circuit court, upon application of the Director, or his or her authorized representative, to compel obedience by proceedings for contempt, as in the case of disobedience of the requirements of a subpoena issued by such court or a refusal to testify therein. The Director may certify to official acts.
(Source: P.A. 93-6, eff. 1-1-04.)

820 ILCS 112/27

    (820 ILCS 112/27)
    Sec. 27. Officers and agents. In addition to an individual who is deemed to be an employer pursuant to Section 5 of this Act, any officers of a corporation or agents of an employer who willfully and knowingly permit such employer to evade a final judgment or final award provided under this Act shall be deemed to be the employers of the employees.
(Source: P.A. 97-903, eff. 1-1-13.)

820 ILCS 112/30

    (820 ILCS 112/30)
    Sec. 30. Violations; fines and penalties.
    (a) If an employee is paid by his or her employer less than the wage to which he or she is entitled in violation of Section 10 or 11 of this Act, the employee may recover in a civil action the entire amount of any underpayment together with interest, compensatory damages if the employee demonstrates that the employer acted with malice or reckless indifference, punitive damages as may be appropriate, injunctive relief as may be appropriate, and the costs and reasonable attorney's fees as may be allowed by the court and as necessary to make the employee whole. At the request of the employee or on a motion of the Director, the Department may make an assignment of the wage claim in trust for the assigning employee and may bring any legal action necessary to collect the claim, and the employer shall be required to pay the costs incurred in collecting the claim. Every such action shall be brought within 5 years from the date of the underpayment. For purposes of this Act, "date of the underpayment" means each time wages are underpaid.
    (a-5) If an employer violates subsection (b), (b-5), (b-10), or (b-20) of Section 10, the employee may recover in a civil action any damages incurred, special damages not to exceed $10,000, injunctive relief as may be appropriate, and costs and reasonable attorney's fees as may be allowed by the court and as necessary to make the employee whole. If special damages are available, an employee may recover compensatory damages only to the extent such damages exceed the amount of special damages. Such action shall be brought within 5 years from the date of the violation.
    (b) The Director is authorized to supervise the payment of the unpaid wages under subsection (a) or damages under subsection (b), (b-5), (b-10), or (b-20) of Section 10 owing to any employee or employees under this Act and may bring any legal action necessary to recover the amount of unpaid wages, damages, and penalties or to seek injunctive relief, and the employer shall be required to pay the costs. Any sums recovered by the Director on behalf of an employee under this Section shall be paid to the employee or employees affected.
    (c) Employers who violate any provision of this Act or any rule adopted under the Act are subject to a civil penalty for each employee affected as follows:
        (1) An employer with fewer than 4 employees: first
    
offense, a fine not to exceed $500; second offense, a fine not to exceed $2,500; third or subsequent offense, a fine not to exceed $5,000.
        (2) An employer with between 4 and 99 employees:
    
first offense, a fine not to exceed $2,500; second offense, a fine not to exceed $3,000; third or subsequent offense, a fine not to exceed $5,000.
        (3) An employer with 100 or more employees who
    
violates any Section of this Act except for Section 11 shall be fined up to $10,000 per employee affected. An employer with 100 or more employees that is a business as defined under Section 11 and commits a violation of Section 11 shall be fined up to $10,000.
    Before any imposition of a penalty under this subsection, an employer with 100 or more employees who violates item (b) of Section 11 and inadvertently fails to file an initial application or recertification shall be provided 30 calendar days by the Department to submit the application or recertification.
    An employer or person who violates subsection (b), (b-5), (b-10), (b-20), or (c) of Section 10 is subject to a civil penalty not to exceed $5,000 for each violation for each employee affected.
    (d) In determining the amount of the penalty, the appropriateness of the penalty to the size of the business of the employer charged and the gravity of the violation shall be considered. The penalty may be recovered in a civil action brought by the Director in any circuit court.
(Source: P.A. 101-177, eff. 9-29-19; 102-36, eff. 6-25-21.)

820 ILCS 112/35

    (820 ILCS 112/35)
    Sec. 35. Refusal to pay wages or final compensation; retaliatory discharge or discrimination.
    (a) Any employer who has been demanded by the Director of Labor or ordered by the court to pay wages due an employee and who fails to do so within 15 days after such demand or the order is entered shall be liable to pay a penalty of 1% per calendar day to the employee for each day of delay in paying such wages to the employee, up to an amount equal to twice the sum of unpaid wages due the employee.
    (b) Any employer, or any agent of an employer, who knowingly discharges or in any other manner knowingly discriminates against any employee because that employee has made a complaint to his or her employer, or to the Director or his or her authorized representative, that he or she or any employee of the employer has not been paid in accordance with the provisions of this Act, or because that employee has instituted or caused to be instituted any proceeding under or related to this Act or consulted counsel for such purposes, or because that employee has testified or is about to testify in an investigation or proceeding under this Act, or offers any evidence of any violation of this Act, shall be liable to the employee for such legal and equitable relief as may be appropriate to effectuate the purposes of this Section, the value of any lost benefits, backpay, and front pay as appropriate so long as the employee has made reasonable efforts to mitigate his or her damages and an additional equal amount as liquidated damages.
(Source: P.A. 96-467, eff. 8-14-09.)

820 ILCS 112/40

    (820 ILCS 112/40)
    Sec. 40. Notification. Every employer covered by this Act shall post and keep posted, in conspicuous places on the premises of the employer where notices to employees are customarily posted, a notice, to be prepared or approved by the Director, summarizing the requirements of this Act and information pertaining to the filing of a charge. The Director shall furnish copies of summaries and rules to employers upon request without charge.
(Source: P.A. 93-6, eff. 1-1-04.)

820 ILCS 112/45

    (820 ILCS 112/45)
    Sec. 45. Outreach and education efforts. The Department of Labor shall conduct ongoing outreach and education efforts concerning this Act targeted toward employers, labor organizations, and other appropriate organizations. In addition, the Department of Labor shall conduct studies and provide information biennially to employers, labor organizations, and the general public concerning the means available to eliminate pay disparities between men and women, including:
        (1) conducting and promoting research to develop the
    
means to correct the conditions leading to the pay disparities;
        (2) publishing and otherwise making available to
    
employers, labor organizations, professional associations, educational institutions, the legislature, the media, and the general public the findings resulting from studies and other materials, relating to the pay disparities;
        (3) providing information to employers, labor
    
organizations, and other interested persons on the means of eliminating pay disparities; and
        (4) developing guidelines to enable employers to
    
evaluate job categories based on objective criteria such as educational requirements, skill requirements, independence, working conditions, and responsibility. These guidelines shall be designed to enable employers to voluntarily compare wages paid for different jobs to determine if the pay scales involved adequately and fairly reflect the educational requirements, skill requirements, independence, working conditions, and responsibility for each such job with the goal of eliminating unfair pay disparities between occupations traditionally dominated by men or women.
(Source: P.A. 93-6, eff. 1-1-04.)

820 ILCS 112/50

    (820 ILCS 112/50)
    Sec. 50. Annual Report. The Department shall file with the Governor and the General Assembly, no later than January 1 of each year, a report of its activities regarding administration and enforcement of this Act for the preceding fiscal year.
(Source: P.A. 93-6, eff. 1-1-04.)

820 ILCS 112/90

    (820 ILCS 112/90)
    Sec. 90. Severability. The provisions of this Act are severable under Section 1.31 of the of the Statute on Statutes.
(Source: P.A. 93-6, eff. 1-1-04.)