Illinois General Assembly - Full Text of HR0359
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Full Text of HR0359  102nd General Assembly

HR0359 102ND GENERAL ASSEMBLY


  

 


 
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1
HOUSE RESOLUTION

 
2    WHEREAS, Under Article IV, Section 3 of the Illinois
3Constitution of 1970, in the year following each federal
4decennial census year, the General Assembly by law shall
5redistrict the Legislative Districts and the Representative
6Districts by June 30; and
 
7    WHEREAS, The United States Census Bureau failed to deliver
8the 2020 Census Public Law 94-171 population data to the
9States, including Illinois, by March 31, 2021 as required by
10the federal Census Act; and
 
11    WHEREAS, The United States Census Bureau, on February 12,
122021, announced it would not release the 2020 Census Public
13Law 94-171 population data to the States, including Illinois,
14until approximately September 30, 2021; and
 
15    WHEREAS, On April 26, 2021, the United States Census
16Bureau released the 2020 Census apportionment data, which
17showed that the total resident population of Illinois as of
18April 1, 2020 was 12,812,508 according to the 2020 Census, a
19decrease of more than 18,000 people, or 0.14%, from the 2010
20Census; and
 
21    WHEREAS, In addition to the decennial census, the United

 

 

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1States Census Bureau conducts the American Community Survey, a
2nationwide, continuous survey that includes detailed questions
3about population and housing characteristics, and publishes
4the data on a 1-year and 5-year basis; and
 
5    WHEREAS, State and federal courts across the country,
6including the United States District Court for the Northern
7District of Illinois, have recognized the American Community
8Survey 5-year data as a reliable population measure related to
9redistricting, particularly for compliance with the federal
10Voting Rights Act; and
 
11    WHEREAS, The total resident population of Illinois
12according to the 2015-2019 American Community Survey data was
1312,770,577, which is approximately 0.3% less than the total
14resident population from the 2020 Census; and
 
15    WHEREAS, The 2015-2019 American Community Survey data
16represents the most accurate, recent low-level population data
17available to the Illinois public in the spring of 2021; and
 
18    WHEREAS, The Illinois General Assembly conducted 50
19hearings on redistricting, resulting in hundreds of
20testimonials from the public; and
 
21    WHEREAS, House staff reached out to more than 2,000

 

 

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1community groups, local leaders, and stakeholders in advance
2of these hearings; and
 
3    WHEREAS, At those hearings, the Illinois General Assembly
4heard from experts in the area of redistricting, considered
5comments from public officials and members of the general
6public, and received proposals submitted by members of the
7public and stakeholder groups; and
 
8    WHEREAS, The 2011 General Assembly Redistricting Plan has
9been a model for the nation, resulting in about a third of the
10members in the General Assembly being African American,
11Hispanic, or Asian, which reflects the minority citizen
12voting-age population in the State; and
 
13    WHEREAS, The Illinois General Assembly has drafted a plan
14for redistricting the Legislative Districts and the
15Representative Districts (the "2021 General Assembly
16Redistricting Plan"); therefore, be it
 
17    RESOLVED, BY THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ONE
18HUNDRED SECOND GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, that
19in establishing boundaries for Illinois Legislative and
20Representative Districts ("Districts"), the following
21redistricting principles were taken into account:
22        (i) each of the Districts contained in the 2021

 

 

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1    General Assembly Redistricting Plan was drawn to be
2    substantially equal in population;
3        (ii) each of the Districts contained in the 2021
4    General Assembly Redistricting Plan was drawn to be
5    consistent with the United States Constitution;
6        (iii) each of the Districts contained in the 2021
7    General Assembly Redistricting Plan was drawn to be
8    consistent with the federal Voting Rights Act, where
9    applicable;
10        (iv) each of the Districts contained in the 2021
11    General Assembly Redistricting Plan was drawn to be
12    compact and contiguous, as required by the Illinois
13    Constitution;
14        (v) each of the Districts contained in the 2021
15    General Assembly Redistricting Plan was drawn to be
16    consistent with the Illinois Voting Rights Act of 2011,
17    where applicable; and
18        (vi) each of the Districts contained in the 2021
19    General Assembly Redistricting Plan was drawn taking into
20    account the partisan composition of the District and of
21    the Plan itself; and be it further
 
22    RESOLVED, That in addition to the foregoing redistricting
23principles, each of the Districts contained in the 2021
24General Assembly Redistricting Plan was drawn to reflect a
25balance of the following redistricting principles: the

 

 

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1preservation of the core or boundaries of the existing
2Districts; the preservation of communities of interest;
3respect for county, township, municipal, ward, and other
4political subdivision boundaries; the maintenance of
5incumbent-constituent relationships and tracking of population
6migration; proposals or other input submitted by members of
7the public and stakeholder groups; public hearing testimony;
8other incumbent requests; respect for geographic features and
9natural or logical boundaries; and other redistricting
10principles recognized by state and federal court decisions;
11and be it further
 
12    RESOLVED, That the House used the 2015-2019 American
13Community Survey data, election data, and public input to
14establish the boundaries for the 2021 General Assembly
15Redistricting Plan; and be it further
 
16    RESOLVED, That the House hereby adopts and incorporates by
17reference all information received by the House Redistricting
18Committee or the Senate Redistricting Committee that was
19submitted by the general public and stakeholders in person or
20remotely at the hearings; by e-mail; by U.S. mail; by
21facsimile; or via the public portal on the House and Senate
22Democratic redistricting websites; and be it further
 
23    RESOLVED, That the House further adopts and incorporates

 

 

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1by reference transcripts of proceedings for all of the
2redistricting hearings conducted by either the House or Senate
3or both; and be it further
 
4    RESOLVED, That the Representative Districts proposed in
5the 2021 General Assembly Redistricting Plan are substantially
6equal in population, with the largest deviation being 0.37%,
7or 398 people, under the target population; and be it further
 
8    RESOLVED, That the Representative Districts proposed in
9the 2021 General Assembly Redistricting Plan are as compact
10overall as the existing Representative Districts adopted in
112011; and be it further
 
12    RESOLVED, That the Representative Districts proposed in
13the 2021 General Assembly Redistricting Plan are contiguous;
14and be it further
 
15    RESOLVED, That the following summary describes the general
16characteristics of each Representative District and makes
17reference to some but not all of the redistricting principles
18that were considered in drawing that District. The term
19"proposed RD", followed by a number, will refer to the
20Representative District proposed in the 2021 General Assembly
21Redistricting Plan, and the term "current RD", followed by a
22number, will refer to the Representative District under the

 

 

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1current, existing plan adopted in 2011:
2    Cook County and Chicago: Over the past decade, suburban
3Cook County lost population, mostly in the western and
4southern suburbs. Whereas the population in the City of
5Chicago has remained steady, mostly due to population gains in
6the city center and the northern areas. As a result, the City
7of Chicago continues to have the same number of
8representatives, but the district lines are altered to address
9rapidly changing areas with dense population and those areas
10that suffered population losses. The changing populations,
11demographics, and migration of residents within Cook County
12and the Collar Counties requires adjustments to the current
13map. These districts were drawn using the articulated
14redistricting principles, with emphasis on ensuring equal
15population, preserving the core of the current districts if
16possible, and political considerations to maximize the
17political power of the areas that traditionally elect members
18of the Democratic party.
19    Chicago Lakefront: Representative Districts 5, 6, 25, and
2026 represent the area most notably along or near Lake Michigan
21areas. These districts collectively had significant population
22growth and as a result the boundaries have been altered to
23accommodate the growing population, shifts in the other
24districts, and for political purposes. These districts have
25numerous communities of interest, including concerns about
26maintenance of the beaches and lakefront, pollution control,

 

 

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1and maintaining the urban lifestyle of the communities. These
2districts have majority Black population, with small but
3growing Hispanic and Asian populations. The communities in
4these districts tend to pool their political power and
5traditionally elect members of the Democratic party.
6    Representative District 5 had population growth and needed
7to reduce population by nearly 3,000. The proposed district
8maintains a significant majority of the current district and
9includes 85.37% of the current district's population. The
10district includes cultural, economic, racial and ethnic
11communities of interest as it stretches in a corridor from the
12Near North Side to the Loop, Near South Side, Douglas, Grand
13Boulevard, Washington Park, Woodlawn, and Greater Grand
14Crossing. Like the current district, the proposed district
15maintains its high transit availability according to the
16Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP). It includes
17numerous higher education institutions, including Columbia
18College, Roosevelt University, and the Moody Bible Institute,
19and DePaul University's Wintrust Arena, and provide ample
20transit for other institutions of higher education that are
21within one mile, including the Illinois Institute of
22Technology, VanderCook College of Music, Illinois College of
23Optometry, and the University of Chicago. It also includes
24some of the most prominent art and cultural attractions,
25including The Art Institute of Chicago, The Museum of
26Contemporary Photography, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, and

 

 

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1Cloud Gate, popularly known as "The Bean". Despite being a
2highly urban district, proposed RD 5 contains a large amount
3of green, open, or recreational space. It also contains Mercy
4Hospital and Medical Center and Jackson Park Hospital, both
5safety net hospitals serving as a vital source of care for
6low-income and uninsured Illinoisans.
7    There is a slight increase in the partisan composition of
8the district. The proposed district has a total population of
9108,587, with an African American citizen voting-age
10population of 51.7%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population
11of 4.6%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population of 6.5%.
12    Representative District 6 had slight population loss and
13needs to gain more than 300. The district is substantially the
14same as the current RD 6, maintaining 84.15% of the core
15population. Proposed RD 6, like current RD 6, is an urban
16district with cultural, economic, and ethnic diversity that
17stretches in a corridor from the Near North Side to the Loop,
18Near South Side, Douglas, Armour Square, New City, Gage Park,
19Chicago Lawn, West Englewood, Englewood, and Greater Grand
20Crossing. The proposed district continues to include the many
21high education opportunities and cultural institutions,
22including Illinois Institute of Technology, the Illinois
23College of Optometry, the VanderCook College of Music, the
24Lyric Opera of Chicago, Guaranteed Rate Field, and the Harold
25Washington Library Center. It also contains primary offices
26for federal, State, and local governments, including Chicago

 

 

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1City Hall, the George W. Dunne Cook County Office Building,
2the James R. Thompson Center, the Richard J. Daley Center, and
3the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. The proposed district
4would also keep Chicago's historic Financial District intact.
5Proposed RD 6, like the current RD 6, contains medical
6communities of interest, including Howard Brown Health at
7Thresholds South, Planned Parenthood Englewood Health Center,
8Holy Cross Hospital, and St. Bernard Hospital.
9    The proposed district has a total population of 108,012,
10with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1154.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 13.3%, and
12an Asian citizen voting-age population of 4.6%. There is a
13slight increase in the partisan composition of the district.
14    Representative District 25 had significant population
15growth and needed to reduce population by nearly 3,700. The
16proposed district contains nearly 90% of the current district
17population, including its many cultural, economic, religious
18and ethnic communities of interest. The proposed district
19splits fewer current wards than the current district, but
20continues to include major medical, educational, and cultural
21institutions such as the University of Chicago, La Rabida
22Children's Hospital, the Museum of Science and Industry, the
23Frederick C. Robie House, the Smart Museum of Art, and
24numerous theological seminaries.
25    The proposed district has a total population of 108,045,
26with an African American citizen voting-age population of

 

 

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156.7%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 16.6%, and
2an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.2%.
3    Representative District 26 had significant population
4growth and needed to reduce population by 8,500. The proposed
5district contains more than 83% of the current district
6population, with changes made to accommodate the growth of the
7district and population changes in other districts. The
8proposed district splits fewer wards than the current
9district, but keeps intact the cultural, economic, racial, and
10ethnic diversity. The district continues to house some of the
11most famous open spaces and parks, cultural institutions, and
12attractions, including the University of Chicago, Grant Park,
13Navy Pier, McCormick Place, Adler Planetarium, the DuSable
14Museum of African American History, Burnham Harbor, Northerly
15Island, Burnham Park, and Washington Park.
16    The proposed district has a total population of 108,069,
17with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1850.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 4.2%, and
19an Asian citizen voting-age population of 5.2%.
20    Chicago Southwest and Southwest Suburbs: Representative
21Districts 1, 2, 21, 22, 23, and 24 represent the Southwest side
22of the City of Chicago and southwest suburban Cook County.
23These districts experienced population declines. The proposed
24districts were established following the redistricting
25principles and all share commonalities, including significant
26Latino population and a majority who traditionally elect

 

 

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1members of the Democratic party. These districts represent
2many blue-collar, working class families.
3    Representative District 1 has steadily lost population
4over the past two decades, and the changes to the district are
5due in large part to the need to increase total population by
6more than 4,100. The proposed district includes 71.92% of the
7population of current RD 1. The district adds portions of
8current RDs 2, 6, 21, and 22, and represents the neighborhoods
9of Archer Heights, Garfield Ridge, West Elsdon, Garfield
10Ridge, Archer Limits and LeClaire Courts. The proposed
11district includes more of the 14th Ward. The communities of
12proposed RD 1 have many commonalities, including being tied
13together by the transportation industry. RD 1 continues to
14maintain clearly defined borders with permanent fixtures, such
15as railroad lines and expressways.
16    The proposed district has a total population of 108,126,
17with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1811.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 63.4%, and
19an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.5%.
20    Representative District 2, which was current RD 24, lost
21population and changes to the district are due in large part to
22those population shifts. The proposed district needed to
23increase total population by more than 2,900. The proposed
24district includes 53.60% of the population of the current
25district. The proposed district adds portions of current RDs
268, 21, 23, and 24. Proposed RD 2 includes most of Cicero, all

 

 

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1of Stickney, all of Lyons, and significant portions of Berwyn,
2Riverside, and Brookfield. These municipalities have similar
3demographics, with predominant or growing Hispanic
4populations, and many commonalities, including shared school
5districts. During a hearing of the House Redistricting
6Committee focused on this region, the Mexican American Legal
7Defense and Educational Fund commented that they wished that
8this district maintained a strong Hispanic voting age
9population. It was a political priority to ensure these
10communities have an opportunity to elect the candidate of
11their choice. The district is renumbered and paired with a
12different Legislative District for purposes of maintaining
13communities of interest and the political power of the region.
14The proposed district moved west out of the 22nd Ward in
15Chicago - including losing parts of the neighborhood known as
16"Little Village" - and entirely into suburban Cook County in
17an effort to meet the intentions of the incumbent State
18representative who wished to represent more of Cicero.
19    The proposed district has a total population of 108,166,
20with an African American citizen voting-age population of
213.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 54.3%, and
22an Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.3%.
23    Representative District 21, which was the current RD 23,
24lost more than 2,600 in population, and changes to the
25district are due in large part to those population shifts and
26changes in neighboring districts. The district is renumbered

 

 

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1and paired with a different Legislative District for purposes
2of maintaining communities of interest and the political power
3of the region. The proposed district includes 49.93% of the
4population of current RD 23. Proposed RD 21 contains suburban
5Cook County communities west of Chicago, including portions of
6Bridgeview, Justice, Summit, McCook, La Grange, Brookfield,
7Riverside, North Riverside, Berwyn and Cicero. These
8communities share many commonalities, including school
9districts, several major roadways and key intersections that
10serve as major transportation and freight corridors connecting
11the communities throughout the region.
12    These municipalities have similar demographics, with
13predominant or growing Hispanic populations, and many other
14commonalities, including shared school districts. The district
15has a majority Latino population, and as suggested by the
16Latino Policy Forum at a hearing of the House Redistricting
17Committee, this will provide opportunities for the Latino
18community to elect candidates of their choice. However, it is
19important to note the district was drawn using the
20redistricting principles, with an emphasis on political
21priorities.
22    The proposed district has a total population of 108,249,
23with an African American citizen voting-age population of
247.3%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 42.2% and an
25Asian citizen voting-age population of 2.5%.
26    Representative District 22 increased in population by

 

 

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12,359. The proposed district includes 82.45% of the population
2of the current district. The district contains the majority of
3Chicago's Garfield Ridge, all of Clearing, Chrysler Village,
4and West Elsdon neighborhoods, and smaller portions of the
5West Lawn and Archer Heights neighborhoods, along with
6suburban Burbank. The district includes the entirety of
7Chicago's 13th Ward, and portions of Wards 14 and 23. This
8proposed district includes Midway Airport, which many
9witnesses described as the central hub of a community of
10interest. Witnesses cited the area's shared interest in
11soundproofing and the economic development surrounding the
12airport.
13    The proposed district has a total population of 108,244,
14with an African American citizen voting-age population of
152.7%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 52.6% and an
16Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.1%.
17    Representative District 23, which is current district RD
1821, lost more than 5,000 in population and changes to the
19district are due in large part to population shifts and
20changes in neighboring districts. The district is renumbered
21and paired with a different Legislative District for purposes
22of maintaining communities of interest and the political power
23of the region. The proposed district includes 53.83% of the
24population of current RD 21. Boundaries of neighborhoods have
25shifted over the past 10 years, and the new lines reflect those
26shifting patterns. Plus, the district more accurately reflects

 

 

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1the socioeconomic and political priorities of the community,
2including a significant Democratic progressive population. The
3southwestern side of District 23 was extended to create a
4natural border with the I-55 West highway. The "26th Street
5Corridor", a lucrative economic entity, is in the district to
6benefit the surrounding community in District 23. At the
7request of the incumbent and community groups, the proposed
8district includes the entirety of Little Village, which was
9previously split into multiple districts, to maximize the
10political power of a community of interest. The demographics
11of the district continue to be largely Latino with varying
12ethnic groups and migration patterns accounted for in the
13composition, including the movement in the Mexican American
14community from Chicago's Pilsen community to Cicero.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,258,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1716.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 71.2%, and
18an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.4%.
19    Representative District 24, which is the current RD 2,
20lost 700 in population, and changes to district are due in
21large part to population shifts in this and neighboring
22districts. The district is entirely within the City of Chicago
23and includes 84.57% of the population of current RD 2, plus
24portions of RDs 6, 9, 21 and 24. Like the current district, RD
2524 unites Chinatown, and includes more of the surrounding
26areas that coalesce around the Chinatown community. The

 

 

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1district contains communities of interest connected to
2Chinatown, including Coalition For A Better Chinese American
3Community (CBCAC) and the Chicago Chinatown Chamber of
4Commerce. The district is renumbered and paired with a
5different Legislative District for purposes of maintaining
6communities of interest and the political power of the region.
7    The proposed district has a total population of 108,459,
8with an African American citizen voting-age population of
93.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 43.2%, and
10an Asian citizen voting-age population of 23.8%. Together
11these populations will have the ability to elect the
12candidates of their choice.
13    Chicago Northern Shore: Representative Districts 11, 12,
1413, and 14 represent the northern shore of the City of Chicago.
15These districts experienced significant population gain, and
16as a result each of these districts were altered to reflect
17increases in population, changes to neighboring districts, and
18preservation of communities of interest. These districts
19traditionally elect members of the Democratic party, and
20partisan advantage was considered. The changes to these
21districts also make the districts more compact.
22    Representative District 11 had significant population
23growth and needed to reduce population by more than 11,000
24people. The proposed district includes 70.77% of the existing
25district population. The district includes Ravenswood Gardens,
26unites large portions of Lake View, and reunites Roscoe

 

 

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1Village. In following population migration trends, the
2district now includes Wrigleyville, which is an important
3economic driver for the area in tourism and entertainment.
4    The proposed district has a total population of 108,123,
5with an African American citizen voting-age population of
63.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8.3%, and an
7Asian citizen voting-age population of 5.0%.
8    Representative District 12 had significant population
9growth and needed to reduce population by more than 7,100
10people. The proposed district includes 74.71% of the existing
11district population. The proposed district includes the vast
12majority of Boystown, Lakeview, Lakeview East, and Park West
13neighborhoods.
14    The proposed district has a total population of 108,280,
15with an African American citizen voting-age population of
164.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 5.7%, and an
17Asian citizen voting-age population of 5%.
18    Representative District 13 had significant population
19growth and needed to reduce population by more than 8,400
20people. The proposed district includes 88.87% of the existing
21district population. Proposed RD 13 is made up of the
22neighborhoods Uptown, Sheridan Park, Winnemac, Ravenswood,
23Arcadia Terrace, Wolcott Gardens, West Edgewater, and Lincoln
24Square keeping these communities unified.
25    The proposed district has a total population of 108,038,
26with an African American citizen voting-age population of

 

 

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19.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.7%, and
2an Asian citizen voting-age population of 8.9%.
3    Representative District 14 had significant population
4growth and needed to reduce population by more than 1,800
5people. The proposed district includes 94.53% of the existing
6district population. In addition to preserving many of the
7communities of interest, the proposed district brings together
8communities of interest in Rogers Park.
9    The proposed district has a total population of 108,401,
10with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1119.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 12.3%, and
12an Asian citizen voting-age population of 6.4%.
13    Northside: Representative Districts 3, 4, 19, 20, 39, and
1440 represent the northern parts of the City of Chicago, with
15some parts of neighboring suburbs. These districts experienced
16significant population shifts, arguably due to increasing
17gentrification of the area, and as a result the districts are
18altered to reflect the population and changes in neighboring
19districts. The shifting demographics of the area significantly
20impact these districts, and attempts have been made to
21maintain the communities of interest currently served by the
22districts. This area contains various cultural, racial, and
23ethnic communities of interest, and the districts were drafted
24with the goal of preserving as many of these communities of
25interest as possible. The current districts' cores are
26preserved, but the population shifts and migration patterns of

 

 

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1the population result in changes to the borders of the
2district. The proposed districts follow the redistricting
3principles and all share commonalities, including a population
4that traditionally elect members of the Democratic party.
5    Representative District 3 needed to gain population of
6nearly 1,000 people. The proposed district contains 57.65% of
7the current district population. The district unites more of
8Logan Square, Hermosa, and Humboldt Park. In addition to the
9redistricting principles, numerous political purposes were
10considered, including incumbent preservation. The district is
11majority Latino, but that was not the primary consideration
12when drawing the district. Consideration was given to the
13migration patterns and other communities of interest within
14the district. The residence of the incumbent was a factor in
15adjustments to this district, as well as the ability to
16increase the partisan advantage.
17    The proposed district has a total population of 108,180,
18with an African American citizen voting-age population of
194.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 51.1%, and
20an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.3%.
21    Representative District 4 had a population loss of over
221,400 people. The proposed district contains 62.10% of the
23current district population. As requested during testimony
24before the House Redistricting Committee, the district
25maintains a majority of Chicago Grand Neighbors Association
26boundaries, the boundaries of Talcott and Wolcott school

 

 

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1boundaries, and the West Town Branch of Chicago Public
2Library. Important to the area and the incumbent, the district
3maintains the corridor along Division Street from Western to
4Kostner, which is the historical, cultural and economic center
5of the Puerto Rican community. At the request of the incumbent
6and witnesses attending House hearings, the district aligns
7more of the Puerto Rican community to maximize their political
8power. The district is majority Latino, but that was not the
9primary consideration when drawing the district. At a public
10hearing it was stated that the proposed district follows the
11migration patterns of the Puerto Rican community. The
12residence of the incumbent was a factor in adjustments to this
13district, as well as the ability to increase the partisan
14advantage.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,257,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1711.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 42.5%, and
18an Asian citizen voting-age population of 2.5%.
19    Representative District 19 had significant population
20growth and needed to reduce population by nearly 6,300. The
21proposed district retains 75.87% of the current district
22population, with alterations to accommodate the growth of the
23region and population changes in other nearby districts. The
24district is more compact and fractures less townships and
25neighborhoods when compared to the current district. The
26district contains several of Chicago's northwest side

 

 

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1neighborhoods, including Jefferson Park, Gladstone Park, Big
2Oaks, Dunning, Portage Park, Old Irving Park, small parts of
3Belmont Central, Schorsch Village, and Belmont Heights, and
4parts of the suburbs of Harwood Heights and Elmwood Park. It
5also brings more of the current wards into the district to
6follow existing boundaries.
7    The proposed district has a total population of 108,305,
8with an African American citizen voting-age population of
92.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 24.8%, and
10an Asian citizen voting-age population of 6.8%.
11    Representative District 20 was overpopulated by 735. The
12proposed district retains 70.31% of the current population.
13The district includes the 38th and 41st wards of the City of
14Chicago, all of Schiller Park, most of Rosemont, and portions
15of Niles, River Grove, Norridge, and Harwood Heights. The
16proposed district unites all of Rosemont, which allows a
17partisan advantage to other neighboring districts, and moves
18the casino located in Des Plaines to a district that includes a
19majority of Des Plaines (RD 55).
20    The proposed district has a total population of 108,449,
21with an African American citizen voting-age population of .8%,
22a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 12.3%, and an
23Asian citizen voting-age population of 4.2%.
24    Representative District 39 had a population loss of nearly
252,500. The proposed district retains 73.43% of the current
26population, and includes significant portions of Logan Square,

 

 

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1Avondale, Kilbourn Park, and Palmer Square. The district was
2drawn to consolidate the Logan Square neighborhood and
3maintain the entirety of Palmer Square. It also maintains the
4vibrant business district along Milwaukee Avenue and unites it
5with another growing business district on Elston utilized by
6the constituents of the district. The residence of the
7incumbent was a factor in adjustments to this district, as
8well as the ability to increase the partisan advantage.
9    The proposed district has a total population of 108,108,
10with an African American citizen voting-age population of
113.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 45.7%, and
12an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.9%.
13    Representative District 40 had a population loss of more
14than 1,800. The proposed district retains 79.48% of the
15current population. Changes to the district reflect the need
16to increase population, make the district more compact, and
17maintain numerous communities of interest. The district unites
18more of Avondale and Irving Park East. It also preserves the
19Albany Park neighborhood, which has one of the highest
20foreign-born populations in the city and is the third most
21diverse zip code in the country with more than 40 languages
22spoken in the area's public schools. Residents are from
23regions of Central America, South America, Eastern Europe,
24India, Southeast Asia, and Eastern Asia. Albany Park residents
25with roots in Korea and other parts of Asia have shared
26cultural and social similarities and contributed to the

 

 

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1redevelopment of Lawrence Avenue into a commercial corridor.
2This community of interest along Lawrence Avenue within the
3Albany Park Neighborhood has been preserved in a single
4district.
5    The proposed district has a total population of 108,278,
6with an African American citizen voting-age population of
74.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 37.8%, and
8an Asian citizen voting-age population of 9.6%.
9    Chicago West Side and West Suburbs: The districts located
10in Chicago's west side and western suburbs and share many
11commonalities, including an overall loss of population.
12Population migration patterns and gentrification of various
13areas have contributed to changes in the region. As a result,
14the current districts have been altered for population and
15various political considerations.
16    Representative District 7 had a population loss of nearly
17400, and the proposed district contains 82.97% of the current
18district population. The current district is entirely within
19the Cook County suburbs, but to accommodate the population
20loss and neighboring districts, the proposed district retains
21the core of the current district and adds new population from
22DuPage County. The district contains all or parts of the
23following municipalities: Melrose Park, Maywood, Forest Park,
24River Forest, Broadview, Bellwood, Hillside, Berkeley,
25Northlake, Elmhurst, Oak Brook, Westchester, La Grange Park,
26and Western Springs. The communities have much in common,

 

 

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1namely that nearly every community consists primarily of
2owner-occupied single-family homes.
3    Like the current district, no single minority group
4represents a majority of the voting age population, but
5collectively the district has a majority minority population.
6    The proposed district has a total population of 108,285,
7with an African American citizen voting-age population of
847.6%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 14.3%, and
9an Asian citizen voting-age population of 2.6%.
10    Representative District 8 had a population loss of nearly
11800. RD 8 contains 74.55% of the current district and contains
12portions of Chicago, Oak Park, Cicero, Berwyn, Forest Park,
13North Riverside, Broadview, La Grange Park, Westchester, La
14Grange, Western Springs, Indian Head Park, Countryside, and
15Hodgkins. To accommodate for the population loss and
16neighboring population loss, Brookfield is moved into another
17district and RD 8 adds population from other communities that
18are parts of the townships currently included in RD 8. The
19changes keep together more of the population encompassed by
20local high school districts.
21    The proposed district has a total population of 108,225,
22with an African American citizen voting-age population of
2353.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 10%, and an
24Asian citizen voting-age population of .9%.
25    Representative District 9 had a population gain of more
26than 3,700. The proposed district retains 87.21% of the

 

 

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1current population. The district is located entirely within
2Chicago and includes Sheffield Neighbors, Ranch Triangle,
3Goose Island, River West, Fulton River District, West Loop,
4Greektown, Little Italy, Illinois Medical District, Tri
5Taylor, Douglas Park, North Lawndale, and Homan Square. The
6area has undergone tremendous changes over the past decade,
7arguably due to gentrification and population shifts. The
8district was drawn to maintain as much of the core as possible,
9including retaining North Lawndale and the Illinois Medical
10District, one of the largest medical districts in the United
11States with the John H. Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Rush
12University Medical Center, University of Illinois College of
13Medicine, and the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center. The proposed
14district contains University of Illinois-Chicago.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,293,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1745.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8%, and an
18Asian citizen voting-age population of 7.3%.
19    Representative District 10 had a population increase of
20more than 600, but the district contains the main core and more
21than 76.49% of the current district population. The district
22is located entirely within Chicago and includes Bucktown,
23Wicker Park, Sheffield Neighbors, Ranch Triangle, Pulaski
24Park, Noble Square, West Town, West Jackson Boulevard
25District, Garfield Park, and Fifth City. The proposed district
26takes a portion of the 27th Ward from RD 9 and moves it into RD

 

 

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110 to consolidate more of the ward. The area has undergone
2tremendous changes over the past decade, arguably due to
3gentrification and population shifts.
4    The proposed district has a total population of 108,337,
5with an African American citizen voting-age population of
642.4%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 9.9%, and
7an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.5%.
8    Representative District 77 had a population loss of more
9than 1,000. The proposed district retains 86.65% of the
10current population. The district contains the entirety of
11Bensenville, Stone Park, and Addison, plus the majority of
12Northlake, Franklin Park and Melrose Park, as well as portions
13of Wood Dale. RD 77 includes the geographic footprint of
14O'Hare Airport, and the communities within the district are
15tied economically to O'Hare Airport and the extensive network
16of freight train lines and roadways that run through the area.
17    The proposed district has a total population of 107,982,
18with an African American citizen voting-age population of
193.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 44%, and an
20Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.6%.
21    Representative District 78 had a population loss of more
22than 3,000. The core of the district remains the west side of
23Chicago in the Austin neighborhood and west suburban
24communities of Oak Park, Elmwood Park, and River Grove. The
25proposed district retains 77.20% of the current population.
26The major change is that a majority of Oak Park is united with

 

 

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1a majority of River Forest. There are several small cultural
2institutions, such as museums, that the incumbent requested
3remain in one district.
4    The proposed district has a total population of 108,379,
5with an African American citizen voting-age population of
631.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.6%, and
7an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3%.
8    Chicago South Side and South Suburbs: The districts in
9Chicago's South Side and south suburbs sustained some of the
10heaviest population loss in northern Illinois. While Chicago's
11population overall remained steady over a ten-year period,
12significant growth in the Loop and north shore areas mask
13population loss on the south side. An overall population loss
14in Cook County was also largely concentrated in the
15southlands.
16    Representative District 27 had a population loss of nearly
172,900. The proposed district is very similar to the current
18district, and retains 53.54% of the current population, with
19changes to accommodate population shifts the district and
20neighboring districts. RD 27 consists of portions of Chicago's
21Roseland neighborhood, Blue Island, Alsip, Crestwood, Oak
22Forest, Orland Park, Tinley Park, and Orland Hills. The
23district was drawn to unite the entire community surrounding
24Roseland hospital, a safety net hospital.
25    The proposed district has a total population of 108,197,
26with an African American citizen voting-age population of 54%,

 

 

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1a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 4.7%, and an Asian
2citizen voting-age population of 1.6%.
3    Representative District 28 lost more than 6,400 in
4population, as the population tends to trend further south.
5The proposed district retains 55.42% of the current
6population. To compensate for the population loss, the
7district moves further into suburban Cook County. The district
8includes a small portion of Chicago and portions of Calumet
9Park, Riverdale, Blue Island, part of Posen, Robbins,
10Crestwood, Oak Forest, and Tinley Park.
11    The proposed district has a total population of 108,255,
12with an African American citizen voting-age population of 50%,
13a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.4%, and an
14Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.4%.
15    Representative District 29 had a slight increase in
16population and needed to reduce by nearly 200. Proposed RD 29
17is substantially the same as the current district, with the
18core preserved and more than 68% of the district population
19remaining in the district. Changes to the district reflect the
20need to reduce population in this district and account for
21other neighboring districts, to make the district more
22compact, and maintain numerous communities of interest. The
23proposed RD 29 encompasses regions of Cook, Will, and Kankakee
24counties, and municipalities including the City of Chicago,
25Dolton, Calumet City, South Holland, Thornton, Glenwood, Ford
26Heights, Sauk Village, Steger, Crete, Beecher, Peotone,

 

 

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1Manteno, and Bradley. The geographic composition of the
2district undergoes an eastward shift in its northwestern
3border, shifting to the east in the northern portion of its
4western border, and then shifts west in parts of its southern
5western border. Transportation arteries include proximity to
6I-57, I-80, I-90, I-294, and Route 394. Communities within the
7Will and Kankakee portions of proposed RD 29 are more suburban
8and exurban than rural, and several communities in the Will
9County portion are part of the Southland region of Illinois.
10There are many communities of interest throughout this
11district, including schools that often compete against each
12other in athletics. As proposed, the district is relatively
13homogenous in that it is largely composed of middle-class
14working families which is consistent with current RD 29.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,158,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of 58%,
17a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 3.9%, and an Asian
18citizen voting-age population of .3%.
19    Representative District 30 had a minimal population loss
20of under 400. The proposed district retains 76.83% of the
21current population. RD 30 retains incumbent relationships and
22continues to include the municipalities of Harvey, Dixmoor,
23Midlothian, Oak Forest, Markham, Phoenix, Dolton, Hazel Crest,
24East Hazel Crest, Homewood, and Flossmoor. Much of the
25boundaries of the district follows municipal boundaries like
26the northern edges of Dixmoor, Dolton, Midlothian, and Harvey

 

 

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1make up nearly the entirety of the northern border.
2    The proposed district has a total population of 108,260,
3with an African American citizen voting-age population of
457.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 9.2%, and
5an Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.5%.
6    Representative District 31 lost more than 4,000
7population. The proposed district maintains the core of the
8district, with 78.99% of the current population, and keeps
9similar communities of interest intact, while recognizing
10popular migration patterns. The district includes a portion of
11Chicago's Auburn Gresham, Beverly View, Wrightwood, and a
12small part of Ashburn, as well as the suburbs of Hometown, Oak
13Lawn Village, Hickory Hills, Palos Hills, and Willow Springs.
14    The proposed district has a total population of 108,308,
15with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1656.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8.2%, and
17an Asian citizen voting-age population of .7%.
18    Representative District 32 had a population loss of more
19than 2,700. The proposed district maintains the core of the
20current district, with 79.10% of the current population, and
21extends west to gain population, while recognizing the needs
22of other neighboring districts. The district includes portions
23of Chicago's Englewood, West Englewood, Marquette Park,
24Ashburn, and Scottsdale neighborhoods, suburbs of Burbank,
25Bridgeview, Hickory Hills, and a small part of Justice. These
26communities share many commonalities, and the boundaries of

 

 

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1proposed RD 32 reflect the competing goals of preserving the
2existing district balanced against the need to obtain more
3population to reach the equal population target.
4    The proposed district has a total population of 108,384,
5with an African American citizen voting-age population of
657.7%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 18%, and an
7Asian citizen voting-age population of 1%.
8    Representative District 33 had a slight population loss of
9nearly 260. The proposed district retains 90.63% of the
10current population, while making adjustment for population in
11the district and neighboring districts. Proposed RD 33
12comprises parts of Chicago, Burnham, Calumet City, Lansing,
13and Lynwood. The district connects the more urban suburbs of
14Cook County with the parts of Chicago that share common
15interests. Proposed RD 33 is home to many employees of Chicago
16and Cook County and connects areas with similar median incomes
17and economic interests.
18    The proposed district has a total population of 108,324,
19with an African American citizen voting-age population of
2064.3%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 16%, and an
21Asian citizen voting-age population of 0.3%.
22    Representative District 34 had a population loss of around
233,400. The proposed district retains the core of the district
24while making adjustment for population in the district and
25neighboring districts and reducing split communities in the
26current district. Approximately 70% of the population in the

 

 

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1current district is retained in the proposed district.
2Proposed RD 34 keeps most of the current district intact, with
3the southern border now going to the Kankakee County Line and
4part of the Southwestern border along the Kankakee River. The
5proposed RD 34 now contains all of Momence, which fulfills a
6request from written testimony submitted by Momence elected
7officials. To reduce the number of split communities, the
8majority of Sauk Village is now in one district, and many other
9municipalities in Kankakee County that are split in the
10current district are now located in other proposed districts.
11Municipalities added in proposed RD 34 such as Sun River
12Terrace, Aroma Park, St. Anne, and Hopkins Park are kept
13intact. Proposed RD 34 unites Momence, Ganeer, Aroma,
14Yellowhead, St. Anne, and Pembroke townships together.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,200,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1768.4%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 4.8%, and
18an Asian citizen voting-age population of 0.3%.
19    Representative District 35 is overpopulated by more than
201,100. To accommodate the population growth and changes in
21other districts in the region, the proposed district reduces
22population in the northern portion and picks up population in
23the southern and western borders. More than 63% of the current
24district's population resides in the proposed district. The
25proposed district contains portions of Chicago, Merrionette
26Park, Alsip, Worth, Palos Heights, Palos Park, and Orland

 

 

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1Park. This splits fewer communities than the current RD 35.
2The communities within proposed RD 35 are united by common
3socioeconomic characteristics, with the majority residents as
4single-family homeowners who move into these communities to
5take advantage of their housing values, quality schools, and
6low crime rates. Many of the residents of the suburban
7townships have either moved from Chicago themselves or are the
8children of former Chicago residents. The eastern portion of
9the district in Beverly and Morgan Park is racially diverse
10and the far eastern portion in Washington Heights is largely
11African-American. These communities are economically similar
12to other portions of the proposed RD 35. Additionally,
13religious communities are kept together in proposed RD 35 to
14the east and the suburban portion to the west.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,250,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1721.6%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 7%, and an
18Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.3%.
19    Representative District 36 had a population loss of nearly
20600. The proposed district is nearly identical to the current
21district and contains 89.54% of the current population. To
22accommodate for population shifts in other districts within
23the region, the district loses population in the northeast
24section and gains populations in the southeast, south central,
25and north central section.
26    Proposed RD 36 contains the same areas as the current

 

 

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1district, including portions of Chicago's Ashburn, Beverly,
2and Mount Greenwood communities, all of Evergreen Park, the
3majority of Oak Lawn, Chicago Ridge, and Palos Hills as well as
4portions of Worth, Palos Heights, Palos Hills, Palos Park, and
5Willow Springs. The district is largely similar
6socioeconomically, with a high percentage of single-family
7owner-occupied homes and middle-class incomes.
8    The proposed district has a total population of 108,156,
9with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1013.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.2%, and
11an Asian citizen voting-age population of 2.4%.
12    Representative District 37 had population growth and
13needed to reduce population by nearly 2,900. The district
14includes portions of Cook and Will counties, and the proposed
15district contains the same municipalities as the current
16district, which includes Frankfort, Homer Glen, Joliet,
17Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Hills, Orland Park, and
18Tinley Park. The proposed district retains 86.13% of the
19current population. To reduce the population and accommodate
20population shifts in neighboring districts, the proposed RD 37
21recedes from parts of the current RD 37's northeastern
22boundaries, southeastern boundaries, and southern boundaries.
23Proposed RD 37 shifts its north central boundary further
24northward. This makes the proposed RD 37 more compact than the
25current RD 37. Proposed RD 37, like the current RD 37, is
26economically homogeneous, with median annual incomes above

 

 

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1$80,000 and ranging to over $100,000.
2    The proposed district has a total population of 108,281,
3with an African American citizen voting-age population of
41.4%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 5.5%, and an
5Asian citizen voting-age population of 2.5%.
6    Representative District 38 was overpopulated by nearly
7600, and adjustments to the district were made to assist
8neighboring districts with population and increase the
9political competitiveness of the region. While the core of the
10district remains the same, the changes were made primarily for
11political purposes. The proposed district retains 78.98% of
12the current population. The district contains Frankfort,
13Matteson, Olympia Park, Country Club Hills, Tinley Park, and
14Mokena with over 75% home ownership and median property values
15over $125,000. The district also preserves numerous
16communities of interest, including school districts.
17    The proposed district has a total population of 108,146,
18with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1951.4%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 4.4%, and
20an Asian citizen voting-age population of 2%.
21    Representative District 79 was underpopulated by over
221,700 people. The proposed district contains 75.68%. It
23includes the municipalities of Park Forest, Crete, University
24Park, Monee, Andres, Manteno, Bourbonnais, Bradley, Limestone,
25Kankakee, Bonfield, Irwin, Herscher, Sammons Point, Chebanse,
26Union Hill, Essex, Reddick, Cabrey, Braceville, Coal City,

 

 

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1Godley, and Diamond. RD 79 contains four different counties -
2Cook, Will, Kankakee, and Grundy. The communities share
3economic interests, many commuting into the city for work and
4making median household incomes ranging from $37,894 to
5$74,755 per year. This district was drawn to make the seat more
6competitive.
7    The proposed district has a total population of 108,182,
8with an African American citizen voting-age population of
922.7%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 5.9%, and
10an Asian citizen voting-age population of .9%.
11    Representative District 80 had population growth and
12needed to reduce population by nearly 1,900. The proposed
13district retains 67.01% of the current population. The
14district is located in Cook and Will counties, and includes
15the municipalities of Chicago Heights, South Chicago Heights,
16Steger, Park Forest, Crete, New Lenox, Frankfort, Manhattan,
17Wilton, Symerton, Wilmington, Lakewood shorts, Rest Haven,
18Richie, Custer Park, and Diamond. The district maintains
19numerous communities of interest and connects towns that share
20services, employers, and school districts.
21    The proposed district has a total population of 108,256,
22with an African American citizen voting-age population of
2329.3%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 10.8%, and
24an Asian citizen voting-age population of .6%.
25    Northern Cook Suburbs and Lake County: Representative
26Districts 15, 16, 17, 18, 51, 52, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, and 64

 

 

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1represent various parts of northern Cook, Lake, and McHenry
2counties. These districts sustained various changes in
3population. These districts were drawn to address population
4issues and to provide greater political advantages to the
5majority party.
6    Representative District 15 had population growth and
7needed to reduce population by nearly 2,130. The proposed
8district retains 75.09% of the current population. The
9district includes portions of Chicago's Forest Glen
10neighborhoods; the municipalities of Morton Grove, and Niles;
11and small parts of Lincolnwood and Skokie. The current
12district retains many portions of the current district, but to
13assist with population and compactness, the proposed district
14consolidates more of Morton Grove and Niles, and the city of
15Glenview is removed from RD 15 and consolidated in RDs 17 and
1618.
17    The proposed district has a total population of 108,212,
18with an African American citizen voting-age population of
192.3%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 12.1%, and
20an Asian citizen voting-age population of 19.7%.
21    Representative District 16 had significant population
22growth and is overpopulated by more than 5,600. The proposed
23district retains 91.96% of the current population. The core of
24the district remains in Skokie and Lincolnwood, with a portion
25of Chicago. These communities share similar racial, ethnic,
26and religious demographics. At the request of community

 

 

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1members, the district will ensure more of the Orthodox Jewish
2community is kept together to maximize the political power of
3and maintain the community of interest.
4    The proposed district has a total population of 108,417,
5with an African American citizen voting-age population of 9%,
6a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.7%, and an
7Asian citizen voting-age population of 25.5%.
8    Representative District 17 is overpopulated by
9approximately 300. The district includes portions of Glenview,
10Northbrook, Wilmette, Skokie, Golf, and Evanston.
11Approximately 91.26% of the current district's population
12remains in the proposed district. The existing southeastern
13boundary remains largely unchanged except a few blocks of
14Skokie were exchanged for population reasons to ensure that
15the Orthodox Jewish community was more consolidated into RD
1616. At the request of community members, the proposed district
17consolidates a majority of Glenview School District, which was
18previously located in multiple districts.
19    The proposed district has a total population of 108,214,
20with an African American citizen voting-age population of
213.7%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 4.9%, and an
22Asian citizen voting-age population of 15.5%.
23    Representative District 18 had population growth and
24needed to reduce population by nearly 1,300. The proposed
25district retains 90.02% of the current population. Proposed RD
2618 includes most of Evanston, Winnetka, Northfield, and

 

 

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1Kenilworth, and a small part of Wilmette. At the request of
2Evanston elected officials, Evanston is located entirely
3within one Legislative District and now sits within RD 17 and
418. The proposed district unites two densely populated wards
5that are historically home to a large African American
6population to maximize political power and increase the
7partisan advantage for the incumbent. This district links high
8income communities with similar interest areas.
9    The proposed district has a total population of 108,198,
10with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1112.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 7%, and an
12Asian citizen voting-age population of 6.5%.
13    Representative District 51 was overpopulated by 4,100. The
14proposed RD 51 includes the municipalities of Inverness,
15Palatine, Deer Park Village, Lake Zurich, Forest Lake,
16Kildeer, Hawthorn Woods, and parts of Long Grove, Barrington,
17Mundelein, and Libertyville. This district was drawn to
18maintain the core of the district, maintaining 62.81% of the
19current district, while accounting for population shifts
20throughout the region and State. The district also was
21affected by changes made in surrounding districts to increase
22their political advantage. The proposed RD 51 has a population
23of 108,103 people, with an African American citizen voting-age
24population of 1.3%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population
25of 4.4%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population of 9.3%.
26    Representative District 52 was underpopulated by 1,707

 

 

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1people. The proposed district contains 75.91% of the current
2district. It includes the municipalities of Algonquin,
3Barrington, North Barrington, South Barrington, Barrington
4Hills, Lake Barrington, Carpentersville, Tower Lakes,
5Wauconda, Oakwood Hills. The communities within the proposed
6district are largely upper middle class economically and share
7similar demographics. They share similar median home values as
8well as median income households that are largely above the
9statewide median income. The proposed RD 52 has a population
10of 108,280 people, with an African American citizen voting-age
11population of 1.3%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population
12of 5.8%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population of 5.0%.
13    Representative District 59 had population growth and
14needed to reduce population by more than 500. The proposed
15district includes 79.03% of the current district's population.
16The proposed district is mostly located in Lake County, with a
17small part of Cook County to retain a common area in Wheeling.
18The district includes the municipalities of Buffalo Grove,
19Wheeling, Lincolnshire, Indian Creek, Vernon Hills, Mundelein,
20Green Oaks, and Park City and portions of Libertyville and
21Mettawa. The proposed district remains mostly the same,
22although it brings in more of Libertyville to consolidate a
23township and keep communities of interest together. For
24example, Vernon Hills, Green Oaks, part of Indian Creek, part
25of Mettawa, and Libertyville all feed into Community High
26School District 128.

 

 

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1    The proposed district has a total population of 108,418,
2with an African American citizen voting-age population of
32.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.9%, and
4an Asian citizen voting-age population of 12.3%.
5    Representative District 60 was underpopulated by more than
6350. The proposed district retains 88.59% of the current
7population. The district includes most of Waukegan, a large
8part of North Chicago, and portions of Wadsworth Village,
9Gurnee, and Park City. Beach Park was removed from the
10district to consolidate it with alike communities to the north
11in RD 61, and more of North Chicago was included to further
12consolidate the municipality.
13    The proposed district has a total population of 107,929,
14with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1526.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 31.4%, and
16an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.4%.
17    Representative District 61 was underpopulated by more than
182,100 people. The proposed district contains 76.22% of the
19current district. It includes the municipalities of Beach
20Park, Gurnee, Zion, Winthrop Harbor, Wadsworth Village, Old
21Mill Creek, Lindenhurst, and Grandwood Park, and parts of
22Grayslake, Venetian Village, Third Lake, Gages Lake, and Lake
23Villa. This district was drawn for political purposes to
24assist with increasing the political advantage of this
25district, as well as to impact the political composition of
26neighboring districts.

 

 

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1    The proposed district has a total population of 108,042,
2with an African American citizen voting-age population of
311.6%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 14.2%, and
4an Asian citizen voting-age population of 5.5%.
5    Representative District 62 is overpopulated by nearly 200.
6The proposed district contains nearly 82% of the current
7district, including the municipalities of Long Lake, Round
8Lake Heights, Round Lake Beach, Round Lake, Round Lake Park,
9Grayslake, Hainesville, Grayslake, Libertyville and Gurnee.
10This district was drawn for political purposes to assist with
11increasing the political advantage of this district, as well
12as to impact the political composition of neighboring
13districts.
14    The proposed district has a total population of 108,358,
15with an African American citizen voting-age population of
164.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 16.7%, and
17an Asian citizen voting-age population of 4.5%.
18    Representative District 63 was underpopulated by 879
19people. It includes the municipalities of Crystal Lake,
20McHenry, Woodstock, Huntley, Oakwood Hills, Holiday Hills,
21Lakemoor, Wonder Lakewood, Volo, Hebron, Bull Valley,
22Greenwood. Proposed RD 63 contains the following townships in
23McHenry County: Alden, Hebron, Hartland, Greenwood, Seneca,
24and Dorr. This unites Dorr Township, which is split under the
25current RD 63. It also contains portions of the following
26townships in McHenry County: Grafton, Nunda, McHenry. It also

 

 

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1contains a portion of Wauconda Township in Lake County. In
2split townships, proposed RD 63 largely follows precinct
3boundaries except where necessary for population purposes. The
4northern boundary is the state line with Wisconsin. Similar to
5the current RD 63, the proposed RD 63 is a mix of agricultural
6land as well as urban land. Proposed RD 63, like the current RD
763, contains stops along Metra's Union Pacific Northwest line,
8which allows commuters to travel to and from downtown Chicago.
9Proposed RD 63, like the current RD 63, continues to represent
10communities along the Fox River and in the Fox River Valley.
11Within the proposed RD 63 are a number of lakes and
12recreational areas that serve local residents as well as
13visitors. This district was drawn for political purposes to
14assist with increasing the political advantage of this
15district, as well as to impact the political composition of
16neighboring districts.
17    The proposed district has a total population of 107,997,
18with an African American citizen voting-age population of
191.3%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8.5%, and an
20Asian citizen voting-age population of 2%.
21    Representative District 64 was overpopulated by 1,659
22people. It contains all of Richmond and Burton townships and
23the majority of McHenry Township. In Lake County, proposed RD
2464 contains portions of Antioch, Grant, and Lake Villa
25townships. This greatly reduces the number of townships
26represented and township splits from the current RD 64.

 

 

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1Municipalities within the proposed RD 64 include Wonder Lake,
2McCullom Lake, Lakemoore, Johnsburg, Fox Lake, Lake Villa,
3Richmond, Spring Grove, Volo, and Antioch. The northern
4boundary of proposed RD 64 is the state line with Wisconsin,
5like the current RD 64. The western boundary largely follows
6township lines except for a small portion in the southwest
7corner of the proposed RD 64, which is incorporated into the
8proposed RD 63 for population purposes. Along the southern and
9eastern boundary, precinct lines are largely followed except
10where necessary for population purposes where the eastern
11boundary lines largely follow Deep Lake Road and Route 45.
12Proposed RD 64, like the current RD 64, continues to represent
13communities along the Fox River and in the Fox River Valley.
14Within the proposed RD 64 are a number of lakes and
15recreational areas that serve local residents as well as
16visitors. Proposed RD 64 is served by Metra's North Central
17Service, which takes commuters to and from downtown Chicago.
18Proposed RD 64's is relatively homogeneous demographically and
19is predominantly middle class and upper middle class. The
20partisan advantage of the proposed RD 64 is similar to the
21current RD 64.
22    The proposed district has a total population of 108,084,
23with an African American voting-age population of 1.4%, a
24Hispanic voting-age population of 6.2%, and an Asian
25voting-age population of 1.5%.
26    Northwest Suburbs: Representative Districts 43, 44, 53,

 

 

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154, 55, 56, 57, 58, 65, and 66 comprise the northwest suburban
2areas. These districts retain the core of each existing
3district to the greatest extent possible, but there are
4deviations due to population shifts, the need to ensure equal
5population, and political considerations.
6    RD 43 has experienced a population loss of 552 people over
7the past decade. Proposed RD 43 has a population of 108,222,
8which is compliant with the "one person, one vote" principle.
9Proposed RD 43 maintains a similar shape to current RD 43 but
10becomes more compact while shifting east.
11    Proposed RD 43 contains portions of current RD's 44, 52,
12and 65. Of the population in proposed RD 43, 92.81% reside in
13current RD 43. Changes were made in part to meet the equal
14population requirement, make the district more compact, and
15maintain communities of interest in the district.
16    Residents of proposed RD 43 are united through portions of
17Barrington Community Unit School District 220, School District
18U-46, and Community Unit School District 300.
19    The eastern border of proposed RD 43 follows the natural
20boundary of Cook County. The eastern border of proposed RD 43
21is expanded east from current RD 43 to include Elgin from
22current RD 44 in order to keep the community together.
23Proposed RD 43 also contains portions of East Dundee,
24Carpentersville, and Streamwood. Similar to current RD 43,
25proposed RD 43 is split between Cook and Kane Counties with a
26majority of the districting remaining in Kane County. The

 

 

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1southern border of proposed RD 43 contains part of a natural
2boundary created by the Metra Soo Railroad.
3    The Fox River runs through proposed RD 43, as it does in
4the current RD 43, serving as a major landmark and attracts
5residential populations, as well drives commercial development
6and tourism in the area.
7    Proposed RD 43 contains Chicago and North Western Railroad
8lines, which serve as major arteries to facilitate tourism,
9development, transportation, and commerce in the region.
10    Citizen Voting Age population is 7.9% African American,
1135.8% Hispanic, and 6.2% Asian.
12    RD 44 is overpopulation by over 1,300 people. Proposed RD
1344 has a population of 108,243, and is therefore compliant
14with the "one person, one vote" principle. Proposed RD 44
15maintains a 94.63% core of current RD 44 and preserves
16incumbent-constituent relationships.
17    Proposed RD 44 maintains a similar shape to current RD 44,
18containing portions of Schaumburg, and a large amount of
19Streamwood and Hanover Park, but becomes more compact while
20shifting east due, in part, to account for a population gain of
211,331.
22    Residents of proposed RD 44 are unified through Township
23High School District 211, School District U-46, Barrington
24Community Unit School District 220, and Schaumburg Community
25Consolidated School District 54.
26    The northern boundary of proposed RD 44 follows I-190,

 

 

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1while the southern border follows a portion of Highway 20 in
2order to maintain a majority minority district.
3    Citizen Voting Age Population in the reconfigured district
4is 5.7% African American, 20.4% Hispanic, and 17.5% Asian.
5    Representative District 53 is overpopulated by more than
61,800 people. The proposed district consolidates more of the
7municipality of Mount Prospect, while adding in Rolling
8Meadows which share similar community characteristics,
9inducing median income. Mount Prospect's Park District
10includes a few blocks south of Golf Road, which are kept into
11proposed RD 53. Harper College is almost entirely located in
12proposed RD 53.
13    The proposed district has a total population of 108,240,
14with an African American citizen voting-age population of
152.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8.4%, and an
16Asian citizen voting-age population of 9.2%.
17    Representative District 54 had a population loss of more
18than 1,400. The district includes portions of Prospect
19Heights, Arlington Heights, and Palatine. The district shares
20many similarities with RD 53, and together collectively
21combine municipalities that form a Legislative District that
22leans Democratic. The proposed district moves southeast to
23account for population shifts. The district also keeps
24together a densely populated Asian community.
25    The proposed district has a total population of 108,369,
26with an African American citizen voting-age population of

 

 

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12.4%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8%, and an
2Asian citizen voting-age population of 6.3%.
3    Representative District 55 gained more than 900 people.
4The proposed district includes 55.79% of the population of the
5current district. The proposed district consists of Cook
6County and includes parts of Park Ridge, most of Des Plaines
7and a small portion of the 41st Ward in Chicago. The 41st Ward
8is a community of similar interest to the suburban Cook County
9portions of the proposed district. The new proposed district
10improves the compactness of the district while maintaining the
11core of the district as Des Plaines. The proposed district
12also brings together two communities (Park Ridge and Des
13Plaines) that share a township and high school township
14district.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,041,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
173.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.2%, and
18an Asian citizen voting-age population of 12.5%.
19    Representative District 56 did not experience any
20significant population changes, but was adjusted to account
21for the neighboring and regional districts. The proposed
22district includes 79.21% of the population of the current
23district. The boundaries of proposed RD 56 increase minority
24influence. Greater portions of the population draw from highly
25diverse areas of Cook County.
26    The new lines for also remove portions of Elk Grove

 

 

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1Village to help consolidate that community into one district.
2Proposed District 56 contain school districts Lake Park
3Community High School District 108, Township High School
4District 214, Township High School District 211, Schaumburg
5Community Consolidated School District 54, and Community
6Consolidated School District 59.
7    The proposed district has a total population of 108,087,
8with an African American citizen voting-age population of
93.6%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 10.4%, and
10an Asian citizen voting-age population of 13.7%.
11    Representative District 57 was overpopulated by more than
12500. The district retains 70% of the population of the former
13district, with the changes primarily to increase the
14likelihood of electing democrats in surrounding districts. The
15district sits mostly in Cook County, with a small portion in
16Lake, and includes Wheeling, Northbrook, Buffalo Grove,
17Glencoe, Riverwoods, and Lincolnshire and very small parts of
18Deerfield, Prospect Heights, Des Plaines and Glenview. The
19portions of Palatine and Mount Prospect were removed to assist
20other districts and aid in maintaining more of those
21municipalities' populations in other districts. To unite the
22cities on the west that share regional interests, the western
23border receded east to accommodate those communities of
24interest. RD 57 still represents both northern Cook and Lake
25counties which share socioeconomic, ethnic, and religious
26similarities. Proposed RD 57 consolidates more of the similar

 

 

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1more urban communities in the region by traveling farther east
2and out of the previous western part of the district.
3    The proposed district has a total population of 108,168,
4with an African American citizen voting-age population of
52.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 9.3%, and an
6Asian citizen voting-age population of 10%.
7    Representative District 58 was underpopulated by nearly
81,500. The proposed district ensures equal population and
9retains nearly 96% of the current population. The district
10includes parts of Highland Park, Deerfield, Lake Forest,
11Bannockburn, Lake Bluff, Highwood City, Glencoe, Lincolnshire,
12Mettawa, Green Oaks, Knollwood, and North Chicago. RD 58 had
13to take in population and expanded west to keep a majority of
14the district in Lake County, and the area of Cook County shares
15commonalities with the rest of the district.
16    The proposed district has a total population of 108,007,
17with an African American citizen voting-age population of
183.6%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 6.7%, and an
19Asian citizen voting-age population of 5.2%.
20    Representative District 65 was overpopulated by more than
21nearly 10,000. It includes the municipalities of South Elgin,
22Elgin, Campton Hills, Lily Lake, Wayne, Bartlett, St. Charles,
23Elburn, Prestbury and Sugar Grove.
24    The proposed district has a total population of 108,395,
25with an African American citizen voting-age population of
263.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8.2%, and an

 

 

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1Asian citizen voting-age population of 5.4%.
2    Representative District 66 was overpopulated by more than
35,500. The proposed district includes 59.58% of the existing
4district population. The proposed RD 66 includes Kane and
5McHenry counties and includes the townships of Algonquin,
6Dundee, Elgin and Grafton. To reduce population, the proposed
7district removed the populated northwest side of Crystal Lake
8and added the less populated parts of Elgin and
9Carpentersville. The proposed district reflects changes
10requested during public testimony at the McHenry County
11redistricting hearing. Public comments asked for communities
12of similar economic and community interests by adding more of
13Carpentersville and Elgin and removing the northwest side of
14Crystal Lake that best reflects the interests of the
15neighboring districts. By adding more of Elgin into the
16proposed district, it allows Elgin to be split into two
17districts rather than split between several districts and
18consolidates the community. Proposed RD 66 also takes in a
19portion of Elgin to consolidate the city more, putting it into
202 districts primarily with the outskirts taken into two other
21districts. RD 66 has the municipalities of Carpentersville,
22West Dundee, Sleepy Hollow, Elgin, a small portion of East
23Dundee, Algonquin, Lake in the Hills, and Crystal Lake. Due to
24the rise in population, much of the west side of the district
25got put into a neighboring district to unite more similar
26communities. School Districts in proposed RD 66 include

 

 

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1Community Unit School District 300 takes in students from
2Carpentersville, West and East Dundee, Sleepy Hollow,
3Algonquin, and Lake in the Hills. These represent a community
4of interest kept together in the proposed RD 66. Crystal Lake
5CCSD 47 also pulls in students from Crystal Lake and Lake in
6the Hills, keeping communities of interest united.
7    The proposed district has a total population of 108,241,
8with an African American citizen voting-age population of
92.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.7%, and
10an Asian citizen voting-age population of 6.1%.
11    DuPage County: DuPage County saw a modest population
12increase over the past decade, and reconfigurations in this
13area reflect this; the cores of existing House districts were
14held largely intact with some adjustments in order to create
15compact districts of substantially equal population. Several
16of the district cross into Cook, Will, and Kane counties.
17    Representative District 41 is overpopulated by more than
182,200. The proposed district includes 89.28% of the existing
19district population. The proposed district retains Naperville
20as the core of the district and maintains the heart of the
21Illinois Research & Development Corridor formed by the
22Interstate 88. The district also includes a portion of
23Warrenville.
24    The proposed district has a total population of 108,047,
25with an African American citizen voting-age population of
265.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 5.81%, and

 

 

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1an Asian citizen voting-age population of 11.3%.
2    Representative District 42, which was formerly RD 48, is
3overpopulated by more than 2,100. The proposed district
4includes 90.31% of the existing 48th District population. The
5proposed district retains the core of current RD 48 and
6contains Lisle, Lombard, Glen Ellyn, and Downers Grove. The
7proposed district maintains the core of the current district
8and the boundaries largely remain the same. Proposed RD 42 is
9anchored by Interstate 355, Interstate 88, the College of
10DuPage, Wheaton College, Hidden Lake Forest Preserve and the
11Morton Arboretum, and it creates transportation corridors by
12extending to include the intersection of I-88 and Highway 355.
13Proposed RD 42 also contains Union Pacific Railroad and has
14public transportation available on the Metra through the Union
15Pacific West Line. The Western border follows boundaries
16created by Glen Ellyn Community Consolidated School District
17and Glenbard Township High School District 87. Proposed RD 42
18picks up portions of former RDs 48 and 81.
19    The district preserves numerous communities of interest,
20including a population of Asian households that stretch from
21the south section of Lombard to the portion of Downers Grove.
22    The proposed district has a total population of 108,166,
23with an African American citizen voting-age population of
244.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 5.8%, and an
25Asian citizen voting-age population of 6.6%.
26    Representative District 45, which is the current RD 47,

 

 

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1had a population gain of 5,881. The proposed RD 45 retains
287.55% of current RD 47. This district was drawn for political
3purposes to assist with increasing the political advantage for
4neighboring districts. It includes all or portions of
5Elmhurst, Oakbrook Terrace, Westmont, Clarendon Hills,
6Hinsdale, Willowbrook and Downers Grove. The district
7stretches from the northern municipal boundary of Elmhurst
8into the south regions of Westmont. The district includes
9Elmhurst University as well as intersections of several busy
10highways including Highway 20, I-290, Highway 83, Highway 54,
11Highway 38 and State Highway 34. This district was drawn to
12protect communities of similar economic interest as well as
13keep several school districts together. The proposed district
14has a total population of 108,076, with an African American
15citizen voting-age population of 3%, a Hispanic citizen
16voting-age population of 7%, and an Asian citizen voting-age
17population of 8.7%.
18    Representative District 46 had a population loss of more
19than 500. The proposed district retains a majority of the
20district, maintaining 93.20% its core, with small geographical
21shifts to account for population loss. The district contains
22all or portions of Carol Stream, Bloomingdale, Glendale
23Heights, Addison, Glen Ellyn and Villa Park. The proposed
24district keeps Villa Park united and follows the boundaries of
25Villa Park and Glendale Heights, while also maintaining strong
26business districts, the DuPage County Forest Preserve, and

 

 

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1access to Interstate 355.
2    The proposed district has a total population of 108,157,
3with an African American citizen voting-age population of
46.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 13.6%, and
5an Asian citizen voting-age population of 14.3%.
6    Representative District 47, the current RD 42, gained more
7than 1,500 people. The proposed RD 47 retains 66.73% of
8current RD 42. The district is located entirely within DuPage
9County and includes Wayne, Bloomingdale, Milton, Winfield,
10Naperville, and Lisle townships. Households in the communities
11within the proposed district have similar median incomes,
12ranging from $82,062 to $125,926. Proposed RD 47 is a strong
13professional community with socioeconomic similarities. Homes
14in the communities within the proposed district also share
15similar values, ranging from $221,700 in Warrenville and
16$416,700 in Naperville. The proposed district is united by its
17proximity to open space recreational land including McDowell
18Grove Forest Preserve, Warrenville Grove Forest Preserve,
19Herrick Lake Forest Preserve, Danada Forest Preserve, St.
20James Farm Forest Preserve, Cantigny Park, Timber Ridge County
21Forest Preserve, Timber Ridge Forest Preserve, West Branch
22Forest Preserve. The district's northwest point sits
23in-between West Branch Forest Preserve and Hawk Hollow forest.
24The district runs east to include Carol Stream, the most west
25point of Glen Ellyn and Wheaton. The southeast corner of the
26district includes a tiny portion of the Morton Arboretum and

 

 

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1goes south to reach the very north edge of Naperville. Along
2the west side sits Warrenville, a small portion of Blackwell
3Forest Preserve and Lakewood.
4    Proposed RD 47 has a population of 108,239, with an
5African American citizen voting-age population of 3.7%, a
6Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 4.8%, and an Asian
7citizen voting-age population of 7.1%.
8    Representative District 48, formerly RD 45, had a
9population gain of 3,441 people. The proposed RD 48 retains
1074.74% of current RD 45. The proposed district is comprised of
11Cook and DuPage counties and contains the municipalities of
12Elk Grove Village, Wood Dale, Itsaca, Roselle, Bloomingdale,
13Bartlett, and Carol Stream. This district was drawn to
14consolidate Bloomingdale Township into fewer House districts
15and keep several school districts together (Roselle SD 12,
16Medinah School District 11, Itasca School District 10). The
17proposed district stretches west to Bartlett and all the way
18east to Elk Grove Village. The proposed district keeps
19communities of similar economic interests and values together.
20The median income of communities in the proposed RD 48 ranges
21from $79,680 to $105,245. The total population for this
22district is 108,316, with an African American citizen
23voting-age population of 2.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age
24population of 9.3%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population
25of 9.8%.
26    Representative District 49, which was formerly RD 84, was

 

 

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1overpopulated by more than 3,300. The proposed district
2maintains 93.49% of current RD 84, and contains the
3municipalities of Aurora, Oswego, Boulder Hill, Naperville,
4and Montgomery. The district is at the intersection of the
5counties of DuPage, Will, Kendall, and Kane.
6    The proposed district has a total population of 108,127,
7with an African American citizen voting-age population of 12%,
8a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 15.5%, and an
9Asian citizen voting-age population of 12.2%.
10    Representative District 50 was overpopulated by 6,700.
11This proposed RD 50 contains 50.39% of the current district.
12It contains the municipalities of Oswego, Yorkville,
13Montgomery, Aurora, Batavia, Geneva, and St. Charles. This
14district was drawn to keep communities of similar economic
15interests and values together. The median income of
16communities in the proposed RD 50 ranges from $69,730 to
17$111,232. This district contains many school districts that
18pull in students from communities within the district, like
19Geneva CUSD 308, Kaneland CUSD 302, Yorkville CUSD 115. This
20district follows natural boundaries like Lake Run and Fox
21River. The proposed RD 50 unites communities in Kane County
22and Kendall County that border the Fox River. These
23communities would have a shared interest in flood control and
24water quality. This district is also connected by US Highway
2534, US Highway 30 and Galena Road. The southern border of the
26district is constructed to keep the East Aurora School

 

 

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1District 131 together to the extent population will allow. The
2northern part of the district includes the Brewster Creek
3Industrial Park, a major regional employment hub. The southern
4end of the district contains a former Caterpillar factory,
5which is the site of a planned redevelopment. Keeping these
6two manufacturing centers together in one House district
7enables a legislator to best advocate for employers in this
8area.
9    The total population for this district 108,167, with an
10African American citizen voting-age population of 6.2%, a
11Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 14.7%, and an Asian
12citizen voting-age population 1.6%.
13    Representative District 81 had a slight loss in population
14of 100. The proposed district remains largely the same
15geographically and includes 85.13% of the population of the
16current district. There is a small shift to help consolidate
17the communities of Naperville, Woodridge, and Downers Grove.
18Proposed RD 81 contains a major transportation corridor, as
19Interstate 355 bisects into the proposed district.
20    The proposed district has a total population of 108,242,
21with an African American citizen voting-age population of
224.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 5.7%, and an
23Asian citizen voting-age population of 9.31%.
24    Representative District 82 was overpopulated by more than
252,000. The proposed district contains 83.11% of the current
26district. It includes Cook, DuPage, and Will counties and the

 

 

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1municipalities of Western Springs, Hinsdale, Indian Head Park,
2Burr Ridge, Willowbrook, Darien, Lemont, Palos Park, Homer
3Glen, Woodridge, and Lockport. This district was drawn to keep
4all of Lemont Township in one House district as well as several
5community school districts; Hinsdale Community CSD 181, Lemont
6Township HSD 210, Lemont Bromberek Combined School District
7113A and Cass School District 63. The district also keeps
8almost all of Glower SD62, Hinsdale Township HSD 86, and Lyons
9Township HSD204 together. The northern border of the district
10is formed by the Burlington Northern Santa FE Railroad and has
11a southern border of north Homer Glen.
12    The proposed district has a total population of 108,131,
13with an African American citizen voting-age population of
143.4%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 5.3%, and an
15Asian citizen voting-age population of 7.3%.
16    Representative District 83 gained more than 1,000 people.
17The proposed district includes 74.06% of the population of the
18current district. It remains largely within Kane County and
19dips into DuPage to increase the population of Aurora within
20the district. Some of the deviations were made for political
21purposes, including to assist the political advantage for
22neighboring districts, including RD 84 and RD 50.
23    The proposed district has a total population of 108,588,
24with an African American citizen voting-age population of
259.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 40.2%, and
26an Asian citizen voting-age population of 3.4%.

 

 

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1    Representative District 84, the current RD 49, had a
2population gain of more than 1,000. The proposed district
3retains 68.81% of the current RD 49, plus it unites West
4Chicago in one district. The district unites a number of
5DuPage County's forest preserves and nature areas into a
6single district, including the James "Pate" Phillips State
7Park, Pratt Wayne Woods County Forest Preserve, West Chicago
8Prairie County Forest Preserve, Blackwell Forest Preserve,
9DuPage County Big Woods Forest Preserve, the Red Oak Nature
10Center, and the North Aurora Island Park.
11    The proposed district has a total population of 108,291,
12with an African American citizen voting-age population of
133.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 14.6%, and
14an Asian citizen voting-age population of 6.7%.
15    Will County: Representative Districts 85, 86, 97, and 98
16sit mostly within Will County, with portions sitting in DuPage
17and Kendall counties.
18    Representative District 85 had a population loss of less
19than 300. The proposed district includes 87.68% of the
20population of the current district, with minor adjustments to
21account for the population change and changes to neighboring
22districts. The proposed district maintains the core of the
23district and contains Woodridge, Bolingbrook, Lemont,
24Romeoville, Lockport, Bonnie Brae, Crest Hill, and Fairmont
25and a small portion of Naperville.
26    The proposed district has a total population of 108,404,

 

 

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1with an African American citizen voting-age population of
215.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 14.7%, and
3an Asian citizen voting-age population of 5.2%.
4    Representative District 86 had a population loss of nearly
51,500. The proposed district includes 84.64% of the population
6of the current district. It includes Joliet, Ridgewood,
7Shorewood, Channahon, Wilmington, Rockdale, Elwood, Preston,
8Ingalls Park, and Lorenzo. The town of Lorenzo is added to the
9district because it follows the growth along the I-55
10corridor, and many in Lorenzo commute to work in Joliet at the
11Exxon Mobil Corp and Refinery.
12    The proposed district has a total population of 107,985,
13with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1419.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 18.5%, and
15an Asian citizen voting-age population of .9%.
16    Representative District 97 was overpopulated by 11,637
17people. The proposed district contains 76.14% of the current
18district. It includes parts of Kendall and Will counties and
19all or parts of Aurora, Naperville, Plainfield, Joliet,
20Shorewood, and Bolingbrook municipalities. This district was
21drawn to keep families of similar economic interests and
22median incomes together. The northern border is Wolf's
23Crossing Rd with the southern border being the municipality of
24Shorewood.
25    The proposed district has a total population of 108,249,
26with an African American citizen voting-age population of

 

 

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19.4%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 13.3%, and
2an Asian citizen voting-age population of 6%.
3    Representative District 98 was overpopulated by more than
43,000. The district includes parts of Joliet, Plainfield,
5Crystal Lawn, Crest Hill, Romeoville, and Bolingbrook, and as
6reconfigured is entirely within Will County. Population in
7parts of Romeoville and Bolingbrook due to population growth.
8Additional areas of Joliet were added to the district to
9enhance the partisan composition of the district. All
10communities in the district are linked by their proximity to
11Interstate 55, which bisects the district. The district
12retains 77.22% of the core of the current district, which was
13originally created based on witness testimony received in 2011
14about the common interests of residents relocating to the
15growing area. Public transportation and school quality were
16among these concerns. Testimony indicated that it makes the
17most sense to keep these growing populations together, as
18opposed to lumping them in with downstate communities.
19    The proposed district has a total population of 108,177,
20with an African American citizen voting-age population of
2114.1%, a Hispanic Citizen Voting Age Population of 17.3%, and
22an Asian Citizen Voting Age Population of 5.7%.
23    North Central Illinois: The districts in the north central
24Illinois region suffered a significant loss of population, and
25as a result the districts have been reconfigured. For the most
26part, the core communities remain intact, but efforts were

 

 

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1made to connect the more urban areas of the districts to
2maximize their political power.
3    Representative District 67 had a population loss of more
4than 7,000 residents. The proposed district retains 87.53% of
5the current district population. To adjust for the loss of
6population, the district adds parts of New Milford and Cherry
7Valley, which were previously in RD 67 prior to 2011. The
8district keeps the 5th and 11th Wards of Rockford in the
9district as requested by Armando Cardenas from the Coalition
10of Latino Leaders in Rockford in his written and oral
11testimony at a hearing of the House Redistricting Committee.
12The proposed median household income of Rockford is $40,100,
13$42,200 for New Milford and $58,800 for Cherry Valley. The
14district remains entirely within Winnebago County.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,223,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1724.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 11.9%, and
18an Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.2%.
19    Representative District 68 had a population loss of more
20than 500 residents. The proposed district retains 67.71% of
21the current district population. The portions of the district
22that include Rockford remain largely unchanged with only
23slight variations to the borders. Manufacturing remains the
24top industry in the current district and the proposed district
25moves east to include the city of Belvidere, which is home to
26the Belvidere Chrysler Assembly Plant. The workers at the

 

 

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1plant are part of The International Union, United Automobile,
2Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW).
3The Belvidere community shares a similar interest to the
4existing core of the current district in that they have a
5shared interest in being represented by someone who supports
6organized labor and carries a commitment to protecting the
7rights of organized labor and working families.
8    The proposed district has a total population of 108,198,
9with an African American citizen voting-age population of 7%,
10a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 9.5%, and an Asian
11citizen voting-age population of 2.5%.
12    Representative District 69 lost more than 600 in
13population. The changes in the district are primarily to
14account for population changes in the region. It maintains a
15variety of major factors that already define this district.
16Additionally, branching out to different geographic areas with
17similar interests is critical in building a district with a
18population unified in its needs from its government and
19priorities for the future. RD 69's proposed northeast border
20proceeds westward along the Illinois - Wisconsin border.
21    The proposed district has a total population of 108,599,
22with an African American citizen voting-age population of
231.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 7.5%, and an
24Asian American citizen voting-age population of 1.1%.
25    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
26Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made

 

 

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1public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican
2state representatives whose primary residences were located in
3the same representative district as another incumbent
4Republican state representative. This new proposed district
5boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
6proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request
7of Republicans, RD 69 was reconfigured to put Representative
8Keicher's home in RD 70, while keeping Representative
9Sosnowski's home in RD 69.
10    Representative District 70 lost nearly 400 people. The
11changes in the district are primarily to account for
12population changes in the region. The proposed district
13maintains consistency in socioeconomic status, ethnic
14tradition, municipal government and various other practical
15considerations. Proposed RD 70 will contain Kane, DeKalb,
16Kendall, and McHenry counties, and the municipalities of
17Sandwich, Plano, Sugar Grove, Gilberts, Huntley and Hampshire.
18Those municipalities have median incomes of $65,984, $73,233,
19$118,638, $97,135, $75,100 and $100,809 respectively.
20    The proposed district has a total population of 108,203,
21with an African American citizen voting-age population of
221.9%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8.4%, and an
23Asian citizen voting-age population of 4.0%.
24    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
25Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made
26public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican

 

 

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1state representatives whose primary residences were located in
2the same representative district as another incumbent
3Republican state representative. This new proposed district
4boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
5proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request
6of Republicans, RD 70 was reconfigured to include
7Representative Keicher's home.
8    Representative District 75 is overpopulated by 4,569
9people. To reduce population and account for population shifts
10in neighboring districts, proposed RD 75 loses population in
11its current southern and eastern portions and gains population
12west and north. This helps make proposed RD 75 more compact.
13Proposed RD 75 contains portions of LaSalle, DeKalb, Kendall,
14Grundy, and Will counties. Townships in the proposed RD 75
15include in DeKalb County, Somonauk; in LaSalle County,
16Northville, Mission, Miller, Manlius, and Brookfield
17(partial); in Grundy County, Nettle Creek, Erienna, Norman,
18Vienna (partial), Wauponsee, Morris, Saratoga, Aux Sable,
19Goose Lake, and Felix; in Will County, Wilmington (partial)
20and Reed (partial); and in Kendall County, Seward (partial),
21Na-Su-Say (partial), Oswego (partial), Bristol (partial),
22Little Rock (partial), Fox, Kendall, Lisbon, and Big Grove.
23Municipalities in proposed RD 75 include Marseilles, Seneca,
24Sheridan, Lisbon, Morris, Channahon, Minooka, Carbon Hill,
25Diamond, Coal City, Braidwood, Wilmington, Joliet, Oswego,
26Plainfield, Yorkville, Milington, Millbrook, Somonauk, Plano,

 

 

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1and Sandwich. Communities within proposed RD 75 are similar
2demographically and have similar rates of owner-occupied
3housing, broadband internet adoption, computer availability in
4homes, and a similar per capita income ranging from
5approximately $30,000 to $35,000. Proposed RD 75 is more
6compact than the current RD 75. The partisan composition of
7the proposed RD 75 is similar to that of the current RD 75.
8    The proposed district has a total population of 107,827,
9with an African American citizen voting-age population of
104.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 8.2%, and an
11Asian citizen voting-age population of 0.7%.
12    Representative District 76 lost nearly 4,000 people over
13the past decade and is bordered to the north, south, and west
14by areas that also experienced extensive declines in
15population. While this regional population loss necessitated
16some significant reconfiguration, 57.63% of the existing RD
1776's core is maintained in the district. The proposed district
18achieves its target population by connecting several of the
19largest cities in the north central Illinois region. The
20southern end of the proposed district maintains the existing
21connection between Ottawa, North Utica, LaSalle, Peru, and
22Spring Valley, and combines this with the city of DeKalb,
23which is kept whole in the proposed district.
24    Several economic, geographic, and regional factors connect
25DeKalb and the Illinois River Valley communities. Median
26income in DeKalb is much closer to the median incomes of Peru,

 

 

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1LaSalle, Ottawa, and other small parts of the district, as
2opposed to communities DeKalb is connected to the current
3configuration, where the median income reaches as high as
4$119,000. With economies centered around manufacturing and
5distribution, both DeKalb and the Illinois River Valley
6communities are centers for organized labor and have a shared
7interest in representation that will prioritize the needs of
8middle-class workers. In the northern end of the district,
9distribution centers for Target, Nestle, and 3M are all
10located in DeKalb, and the Ferrara Distribution Center just
11south of DeKalb, a major regional distribution center for
12Wal-Mart located in Spring Valley in the southern end of the
13district.
14    Nearly all the communities in the proposed district are
15hubs along the interstate highway system, giving these areas a
16shared interest in representation that prioritizes
17infrastructure investment and maintenance. Interstate 80
18connects Ladd, Dalzell, LaSalle, and Dayton in the southern
19end of the district. Interstate 39 links LaSalle and
20Jonesville. DeKalb is a major stop along Interstate 88. The
21DeKalb Oasis, one of Illinois' largest rest stops on
22Interstate 88, is included in the district. The district
23follows State Highway 23 from Ottawa to DeKalb.
24    The district shares environmental interests. The proposed
25district links the four areas in the Illinois River Valley
26that have been designated as Superfund sites by the United

 

 

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1States Environmental Protection Agency - Spring Valley,
2Ottawa, and two sites in LaSalle. Furthermore, including
3DeKalb in the district links these sites with Northern
4Illinois University - one of the state's leading institutions
5for environmental studies.
6    The district also connects river communities with a shared
7interest in flood control and water quality. The Illinois
8River and its tributaries flow across the entire southern end
9of the district, while the Kishwaukee River flows through all
10of DeKalb in the northern part of the district. The district
11also includes Wedron, which borders the Fox River. The Fox
12River makes up the district's southeastern boundary. Boating
13and watersports contribute to the economies of each of these
14communities. DeKalb, Wedron, LaSalle, Ottawa, and Peru have
15numerous businesses dedicated to river recreation, fishing,
16boat rental, and more.
17    DeKalb and the Illinois River Valley communities included
18in the proposed district have a shared interest in hunting and
19fishing. The southern end of the district includes a number of
20popular duck, goose, and deer hunting locations, and hunting
21clubs are a significant part of the local economy. Meanwhile,
22numerous parks and nature areas in DeKalb attract fishers,
23including Prairie Park, East Lagoon, and Rotary Park. The
24proposed district reconnects DeKalb and LaSalle, which were
25previously connected into one representative district under
26legislative maps enacted in 1981.

 

 

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1    The proposed district has a total population of 108,489,
2and the citizen voting age population of the proposed RD 76 is
36.9% African American, 7.4% Hispanic, and 1.4% Asian.
4    Central Illinois: Representative Districts 87, 88, 91, 92,
595, 96, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, and 109 lost
6more than 6,000 people over the past decade, necessitating
7reconfiguration in parts of the region.
8    Representative District 87 includes portions of current RD
987 and 88 in part because the district and surrounding
10districts lost significant population. The district contains
11McLean, Tazewell, Logan counties, and municipalities Pekin,
12Delavan, Atlanta, Emden, Mackinaw, Green Valley, Twin Grove,
13San Jose and Waynesville.
14    The proposed district has a total population of 108,540,
15with an African American voting-age population of 3.1%, a
16Hispanic voting-age population of 2.2%, and an Asian
17voting-age population of 1.2%.
18    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
19Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made
20public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican
21state representatives whose primary residences were located in
22the same representative district as another incumbent
23Republican state representative. This new proposed district
24boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
25proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request
26of Republicans, RD 87 was reconfigured to put Representative

 

 

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1Luft's home in RD 93, while keeping Representative Sommer's
2home in RD 87.
3    Representative District 88 is overpopulated by nearly
42,000. RD 88 is within the counties Dewitt, Piatt, Menard,
5Logan, McLean, Macon, and Sangamon. The communities in this
6district share similar socioeconomic interests with median
7household incomes ranging from $50,480 from $74,684 with
8median home values ranging from $98,400 to $146,900. The
9proposed district has a total population of 108, 307, with an
10African American citizen voting-age population of 3.4%, a
11Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 1.6%, and an Asian
12citizen voting-age population of .4%.
13    Representative District 91 contains Peoria, Tazewell,
14Woodford, and McLean counties. Communities within these
15counties have substantially similar median household incomes,
16ranging from $55,842 in Peoria to $72,808 in Woodford. Median
17home values are also very similar, ranging from $129,800 in
18Peoria to $168,700 in Woodford. Proposed RD 91 maintains a
19community of interest among college students, faculty and
20staff by keeping Illinois State University and Illinois
21Wesleyan University together and united within a single
22representative district. The proposed district also contains
23the intersection of multiple major highways including
24Interstate 39, Interstate 55, Interstate 74, State Route 150,
25Highway 117. The proposed district has a total population of
26108,192, with an African American citizen voting-age

 

 

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1population of 8.1%, a Latino citizen voting-age population of
23.7%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.5%.
3    Representative District 92 lost 3,491 people over the past
4decade, necessitating expansion. The proposed district retains
586.45% of the core of the current district and remains
6entirely within Peoria County. The proposed district expands
7to include more of the City of Peoria and keeps nearly all of
8West Peoria and Peoria Heights. As proposed, the district
9unites more of Peoria School District 150 in one House
10district.
11    The proposed district has a population of 108,089, an
12African-American voting age population of 25.77%, a Hispanic
13voting age population of 3.8%, and an Asian voting age
14population of 1.8%.
15    Representative District 96 lost nearly 6,000 people over
16the past decade. The reconfigured district retains the
17communities of interest formed between the city of Decatur and
18Springfield - two major central Illinois cities connected by
19Interstate 72. The proposed district includes 72.31% of the
20population of the current district. The district as proposed
21contains the vast majority of urban Decatur, all of the towns
22of Mt. Auburn, Roby, and Buckhart, a significant portion of
23the city of Springfield, and portions of autonomous
24municipalities of Jerome and Southern View, which are
25surrounded entirely by Springfield. In response to repeated
26requests from Republican members of the House Redistricting

 

 

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1Committee to consolidate Springfield's representation into
2fewer districts, the proposed RD 96 expands to include more of
3the city of Springfield and consolidate the city's central
4core into two House districts and one Senate district. The
5proposed district also fulfills requests from hearings by
6keeping the majority of Decatur intact as requested by a
7Decatur City Council member and reflecting the socioeconomic
8links between Decatur and parts of Springfield as noted by a
9Decatur business owner.
10    Eastern Springfield shares numerous socioeconomic
11similarities with Decatur; in many categories, including
12median household income, unemployment, and public school
13attendance, Springfield's east side compares more to Decatur
14than to other parts of Springfield outside of the proposed RD
1596. Rather than creating multiple representative districts
16with a significant portion of residents with similar
17socioeconomic needs, proposed RD 96, by joining much of
18Decatur with the east side of Springfield, creates a
19representative district in which the needs and concerns of
20lower-income residents can be better addressed by one
21representative.
22    With the seat of State government in Springfield, many
23State workers commute from Decatur to Springfield, and some
24Springfield residents work at the hospitals and manufacturing
25facilities in Decatur, creating a shared interest on those
26fronts. The health care industry is a major employer in both

 

 

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1Springfield and Decatur; the proposed district places the
2Springfield Medical District in one district while linking
3this area with central Illinois hospitals with similar needs
4and interests in Decatur. The reconfigured district links
5Millikin University with Richland Community College, which was
6previously located in another district.
7    The partisan composition of the district is enhanced by
8extending farther west into Springfield. As configured, the
9district also keeps small central Illinois cities
10Mechanicsburg, Buffalo, and Dawson complete in adjacent
11districts, as these communities share a school district.
12Stonington, Taylorville, and Rochester, which currently are
13fully or partially in RD 96 have been removed so they may be
14kept whole in proposed RD 95.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,128,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
1723.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 2%, and an
18Asian citizen voting-age population of .6%.
19    Representative District 101 was overpopulated by 183
20people. The proposed district reaches its most north point
21in-between the south side of Gibson City and the north side of
22Fisher. The district travels south east along the outside of
23Champaign city limits. The district dips up to pick up St.
24Joseph before continuing south to reach its most southern
25point in Janesville. The western border travels from the
26southern border north passing through or containing the towns

 

 

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1Sullivan, Atwood, Ivesdale, Mahomet and Dickerson. The entire
2district is made of rural areas and small towns outside of
3Charleston and Mattoon. Communities within the proposed
4district are largely similar demographically. They are also
5bound together with similar median incomes. The proposed
6district has a total population of 108,164, with an African
7American voting-age population of 2.2%, a Hispanic voting-age
8population of 2.4%, and an Asian voting-age population of
9.60%.
10    Representative District 102 was overpopulated by 1,040
11people. The proposed RD 102 is in Champaign, Vermilion, Edgar,
12Clark, Cumberland, Effingham, Jasper, Crawford, and Lawrence
13counties. This includes many different municipalities
14throughout those counties that share rural interests and
15values. This district keeps many school districts intact. The
16population of proposed RD 102 is 108,353, with an African
17American voting-age population of 3.2%, a Hispanic voting-age
18population of 1.5%, and an Asian voting-age population of .3%.
19    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
20Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made
21public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican
22state representatives whose primary residences were located in
23the same representative district as another incumbent
24Republican state representative. This new proposed district
25boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
26proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request

 

 

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1of Republicans, RD 102 was reconfigured to include
2Representative Niemerg's home.
3    Representative District 103 increased in population by
43,716 people over the past decade. The district sits entirely
5within the cities of Champaign and Urbana, and retains 100% of
6the core of the existing district. Numerous factors link the
7cities of Champaign and Urbana, including current
8representation, partisan similarities, and the flagship campus
9of the University of Illinois - which is a major employer and
10economic engine in the district. It keeps the cores of
11Champaign and Urbana together with the University of Illinois
12campus, the main housing areas, and the major traffic patterns
13around Champaign, Urbana and the U of I campus. The proposed
14district also preserves, intact and in one district, the
15community of interest populations of African Americans to the
16north of the city centers and Asians to the south of the city
17centers.
18    Keeping the majority of the cities of Champaign and Urbana
19in one House district and entirely within one Senate district
20strengthens both an urban community of interest in this
21district and a rural community of interest in surrounding
22districts. This separation helps ensure that elected officials
23in surrounding areas can focus on issues that are more
24pressing to rural communities.
25    The proposed district has a total population of 108,416,
26with an African American citizen voting-age population of

 

 

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117.1%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 5.8%, and
2an Asian citizen voting-age population of 7.4%.
3    Representative District 104 was underpopulated by over 800
4people. The proposed RD 104 is in Champaign and Vermilion
5counties. The proposed district contains Danville, Tilon,
6Westville, Belgium, Oakwood, Muncie, Fithian, Royal, Savoy,
7Thomasboro, and Rantoul. RD 104 is made up of the areas outside
8of the urban areas of Champaign and Urbana. It extends north of
9the city to take in Thomasboro and Rantoul. It travels east
10along the northern boundaries of Ogden and Stanton Townships.
11This northern boundary follows E 2500 North Rd. The western
12boundary extends all the way to the border of Illinois and
13Indiana. This envelopes nearly the entire municipality of
14Danville. This district was drawn to keep the surrounding
15communities around Champaign Urbana together. The proposed RD
16104 has a population of 108,119, with an African American
17voting-age population of 15.1%, a Hispanic voting-age
18population of 3.5%, and an Asian voting-age population of
193.3%.
20    Representative District 105 was overpopulated by 4,224. It
21includes the counties of LaSalle, Putnam, Marshall, Woodford,
22Livingston and the municipalities of Streator, Metamora,
23Roanoke, El Paso, Washburn and Cornell. It included the school
24districts of Putnam County CUSD 535, Lostant CUSD 425,
25Fieldcrest CUSD 6, Lowpoint Washburn CUSD #21, Roanoke-Benson
26CUSD 60, Flanagan-Cornell Unit 74, El Paso Gridley, CUSD 11

 

 

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1and Lexington 7 McLean County 5.
2    The proposed district has a total population of 108,275,
3with an African American voting-age population of 2.4%, a
4Hispanic voting-age population of 2.5%, and an Asian
5voting-age population of 1.8%.
6    Representative District 106 was underpopulated by 5,283.
7It includes the counties of LaSalle, Grundy, Livingston,
8McLean, Ford, Champaign, Vermilion, Iroquois, and Kankakee.
9Households in the communities within proposed RD 106 have
10similar median incomes, ranging from $46,515 to $77,160.
11    The proposed district has a total population of 108,282,
12with an African American voting-age population of 2%, a
13Hispanic voting-age population of 3.4%, and an Asian
14voting-age population of .7%.
15    Representative District 107 is compromised largely of
16portions of current RDs 101 and 102. Proposed RD 107 contains
17Moultrie, Macon, Shelby, Effingham, Fayette, Christian,
18Montgomery, and Cumberland Counties. Municipalities of Pana,
19Owaneco, Wenonah, Nokomis, Strasburg, Witt, Coalton, Ramsey,
20Herrick, Altamont, Stewardson, Sigel, Sullivan, Lovington,
21Beecher, and Effingham are within the confines of proposed RD
22107. Communities within the proposed district have very
23similar median household incomes ranging from $46,650 in
24Fayette to $61,456 in Moultrie. The proposed district mostly
25follows township lines throughout Moultrie, Macon, Shelby,
26Effingham, Fayette, Christian, Montgomery, and Cumberland

 

 

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1Counties. The district includes municipalities along IL 16
2west of Hillsboro. This includes Witt, Nokomis, and Pana. It
3also unites communities along IL 51. The western border goes
4to Cumberland and Effingham County, then goes east to include
5the city of Effingham.
6    The proposed district has a total population of 108,085,
7with an African American voting-age population of 2.0%, a
8Latino voting-age population of 0.9%, and an Asian voting-age
9population of 0.3%.
10    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
11Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made
12public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican
13state representatives whose primary residences were located in
14the same representative district as another incumbent
15Republican state representative. This new proposed district
16boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
17proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request
18of Republicans, RD 107 was reconfigured to put Representative
19Niemerg's home in RD 102 and Representative Wilhour's address
20in RD 110.
21    Representative District 108 is comprised of large portions
22of former RDs 95 and 99. It includes parts of Madison,
23Macoupin, Montgomery, Christian, and Sangamon counties. The
24proposed district will keep Alhambra, Hamel, Leef, Omphghent,
25Olive, New Douglas, Gillespie, Dorchester, Cahokia, Mount
26Olive, Honey Point, Brushy Mound, Shaws Point, Carlinville,

 

 

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1Nilwood, South Otter, North Otter, Virden, Girard, Bois D'Arc,
2Pitman, Harvel, Raymond, Zanesville, North Litchfield,
3Southern Litchfield, Walshville, Hillsboro, Grisham, New
4Berlin, Island Grove, Cartwright, Loami, Talkington, and
5Auburn Township all under one district. The proposed district
6allows for Springfield to be less split over several districts
7than the current map. The district boundaries follow the local
8county and township boundaries. While Highland School District
9is split between proposed 108 and 109, the "center school
10towns" of Alhambra, Grantfork, and New Douglas are largely
11kept together. The students from these towns attend
12kindergarten through 5th grade at Alhambra and Grantfork
13schools together before going to Highland Middle School and
14High School. The proposed district has a total population of
15108,088, with an African American citizen voting-age
16population of 2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of
171%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population of .6%.
18    Metro East: Generally labeled as the "Metro East", this
19region borders St. Louis, Missouri to the east. It has seen
20significant population loss over the last ten years, losing
21more than 10,000 residents within the four representative
22districts over the last decade. This has resulted in the
23representative districts having to add population to reach the
24targeted equal population. This is an economically and
25socially diverse region with common economic challenges which
26impact all or parts of the area. Many of the residents of these

 

 

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1four representative districts work in and commute to St. Louis
2every day.
3    Representative District 111 had a population loss of more
4than 1,500 residents. The proposed district keeps 82.48% of
5the current district, including the core of Riverbend Region.
6It is located entirely within Madison County, whereas current
7RD 111 is split between Madison and Jersey counties. The
8cities of Alton, Godfrey, Bethalto, Wood River, East Alton,
9Hartford, Rosewood Heights, Roxana and South Roxana all belong
10to the same Chamber of Commerce Group, the Riverbend Growth
11Association. The proposed district removes much of the rural
12areas of the current district and adds more of Granite City so
13it is only divided between two representative districts
14instead of three. The proposed district adds parts of Glen
15Carbon and Maryville which share many of the same social,
16cultural and economic characteristics as seen in other parts
17of the proposed district. The proposed district has a total
18population of 108,160, with an African American citizen
19voting-age population of 8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age
20population of 1.7%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population
21of .6%.
22    Representative District 112 had a population loss of 200.
23The district boundaries were adjusted to accommodate
24significant population loss in the Metro East region and
25retains 79.68% of the core of the current district. It
26includes more of Granite City which splits Granite City

 

 

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1between two representative districts and one legislative
2district instead of three representative districts and two
3legislative districts. The proposed district includes more of
4Caseyville and Fairview Heights, puts all of State Park Pace
5and Fairmont Race Track in one district, and keeps Southern
6Illinois University - Edwardsville campus in the district,
7with the campus boundary as one of the western district lines.
8Changes in the southern border of the proposed district return
9the district to some of the 2001 district boundaries. The
10proposed district has a total population of 108,283, with an
11African American citizen voting-age population of 13.3%, a
12Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 3.4%, and an Asian
13citizen voting-age population of 1.3%.
14    Representative District 113 had a population loss of over
155,000. The proposed district is made up of portions of both
16Madison and St. Clair Counties. While the district expands its
17current border to add population, it roughly maintains the
18same shape and includes 73.54% of the current district. The
19divisions through Madison and Fairmont City follow along
20township and county boundaries. In the proposed district, both
21Belleville High School and O'Fallon High School are all in the
22South Western Conference for sports. The proposed district has
23a total population of 108,258, with an African American
24citizen voting-age population of 27.1%, a Hispanic citizen
25voting-age population of 3.7%, and an Asian citizen voting-age
26population of 1%.

 

 

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1    Representative District 114 had a population loss of over
23,000 residents. The proposed RD 114 largely maintains the
3same shape and includes 70.53% of the current district. The
4proposed district makes whole Cahokia, East Carondelet, Sauget
5and Millstadt which were all previously split with another
6representative district. The proposed district's southern
7border now follows the Freeburg and Smithton Township lines
8and keeps the economic drivers and landmarks such as Scott Air
9Force Base in the district. The proposed district makes whole
10Cahokia Community Unit School District 187 and Dupo Community
11Unit School District 196, which were previously split. The
12proposed district has a total population of 108,174, with an
13African American citizen voting-age population of 39.4%, a
14Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 1.6%, and an Asian
15citizen voting-age population of .90%.
16    Western Illinois:
17    Representative District 71 is underpopulated by 1,955
18people. To gain population and accommodate population shifts
19in neighboring districts, RD 71 shifts from Rock Island County
20and northwards to Rock Island County and southwards. Counties
21represented within the proposed RD 71 include Rock Island
22County, Henry County, Mercer County, Warren County, Knox
23County, and McDonough County. Proposed RD 71 contains the
24following townships: In Rock Island County, Coal Valley
25(portion), Hampton (portion), South Moline (portion), and
26Rural; in Henry County, Colona, Western, Lynn, and Oxford; in

 

 

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1Mercer County, Richland Grove, Rivoli, and North Henderson; in
2Knox County, Rio, Henderson, Galesburg City, Galesburg, and
3Knox; in Warren County, Kelly, Coldbrook, Monmouth, Lenox,
4Floyd, Roseville, Berwick, Swan, Greenbush; in McDonough
5County, Walnut Grove, Prairie City, Bushnell, Mound, Macomb,
6Emmet, and Macomb City (portion). Proposed RD 71 contains a
7higher education community of interest with Black Hawk
8College, Western Illinois University, Monmouth College, and
9Knox College. At the request of the Knox County Board,
10Galesburg is wholly located within one district. Proposed RD
1171 preserves agricultural and small town communities of
12interest by keeping as many townships and municipalities as
13possible intact. The proposed RD 71's partisan index is
14similar to that of the current RD 71.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,241,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of 6%,
17a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 4.7%, and an Asian
18citizen voting-age population of 1.1%.
19    Representative District 72 lost population of more than
203,600. Proposed RD 72 includes 89.06% of the current district.
21Located entirely within Rock Island County, proposed RD 72
22keeps South Rock Island, Rock Island, and Moline townships
23together, as they are in current RD 72. To ensure compactness
24and unite communities of interest, proposed RD 72 fully
25incorporates Black Hawk Township, which is currently split
26between districts. Proposed RD 72 takes in additional portions

 

 

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1of Milan, Moline, and East Moline, while removing more rural
2areas of current RD 72. Expanding eastward to gain population,
3proposed RD 72 includes all of Hampton and more of Silvis,
4which is currently divided by a boundary line. Proposed RD 72
5lies within the Peoria Catholic Diocese, and the
6Davenport-Rock Island-Moline media market-all distinctions
7carried over from current RD 72. It contains one regional
8airport authority in Moline, is represented by the Tri-City
9Building Trades, operates on the Bi-State Regional Commission
10and is covered by the Moline office of the Department of
11Employment Security. All of these characteristics are carried
12over from current RD 72.
13    The proposed district has a total population of 108,502,
14with an African American citizen voting-age population of 10%,
15a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 10.5%, and an
16Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.2%.
17    Representative District 73 was underpopulated by 900. It
18includes portions of Henry, Bureau, Stark, Putnam, Marshall,
19Peoria and Woodford counties. The district's northern border
20follows the natural border created by the Rock River and has
21parts of northeast Peoria as its southern border. This
22district was drawn to keep communities of similar economic
23interest together as the median household income of all the
24counties range from $54,907 to $72,808.
25    The proposed district has a total population of 108,096,
26with an African American citizen voting-age population of

 

 

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11.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 3.1%, and an
2Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.1%.
3    Representative District 74 was underpopulated by 2,973
4people. It includes the municipalities of Rapids City, Port
5Byron, Cordova, Hillsdale, Erie, Hoopla, New Bedford,
6Prophetstown, Lyndon, Tampico, Deer Grove, Morrison, Albany,
7Fulton, Rock Falls, Sterling, Nelson, Walnut, Harmon, Ohio,
8Amboy, Sublette, La Moille, Mendota, Ashton, Franklin Grove,
9Dixon, and Coleta. This proposed district has a population of
10108,161, with an African American citizen voting age
11population of 2.8%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population
12of 7.5%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population of 0.2%.
13    Representative District 89 was underpopulated by 4,762. It
14has similar income levels, and similar home value levels. It
15has several highways within the confines of the district,
16including Highway 75, Highway 70, Highway 2, Highway 72,
17Highway 64, Highway 38, Interstate 39, State Route 2, and
18State Route 251. It also has several outdoor recreations,
19Hononegah Forest Preserve, Kieselburg County Forest Preserve,
20Rock Cut State Park, Rockton Bog Nature Preserve, Sugar River
21Alder Nature Preserve, Colored Sands Forest Preserve, Sand
22Bluff Bird Observatory, and Colored Sands Bluff Nature
23Preserve.
24    The proposed district has a total population of 108,257,
25with an African American citizen voting-age population of
261.7%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 4.5%, and an

 

 

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1Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.0%.
2    Representative District 90 was underpopulated by over
32,000. RD 90 includes the counties of Jo Daviess, Stephenson,
4Winnebago, Ogle, and Carroll Counties. The municipalities in
5this district include East Dubuque, Menominee, Galena, Scales
6Mound, Apple River Village, Nora, Warren, Winslow, Lena,
7Hanover, Elizabeth, Savanna, Mount Carroll, Shannon, Lanark,
8Chadwick, Orangeville, Cedarville, Willow Lake, Freeport,
9Dakota, Rock City, Davis, Lake Summerset, Durand, Pecatonica,
10German Valley, Forreston, Adeline, Leaf River, Mount Morris,
11Oregon, Milledgeville, Thomson, Polo, and Lost Nation. This
12district unites many rural counties that border Wisconsin and
13Iowa. This district was drawn to maintain the partisan makeup
14of the current RD 90 and maintain incumbent relationships.
15This district also successfully keeps together many community
16unit school districts.
17    The proposed RD 90 has a population of 108,285 people,
18with an African American voting age population of 4%, a
19Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 2.1%, and an Asian
20citizen voting-age population of .4%.
21    Representative District 93 was underpopulated by more than
227,495. It includes the counties of Henry, Stark, Knox, Peoria,
23Fulton, and Tazewell. Median household income remains similar
24across the district, from $44k to $63k. The district has an
25abundance of green space and outdoor recreation including
26Snakeden Hollow State Fish & Wildlife Area.

 

 

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1    The proposed district has a total population of 108,384,
2with an African American citizen voting-age population of
32.5%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 1.8%, and an
4Asian citizen voting-age population of .9%.
5    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
6Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made
7public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican
8state representatives whose primary residences were located in
9the same representative district as another incumbent
10Republican state representative. This new proposed district
11boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
12proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request
13of Republicans, RD 93 was reconfigured to include
14Representative Luft's home.
15    Representative District 94 is underpopulated by 2,630
16people. It includes the counties of Rock Island County
17(partial), Mercer County (partial), Henderson County, Warren
18County (partial), Hancock County, Adams County (partial),
19Schuyler County, Mason County, Menard County (partial),
20Tazewell County (partial), Fulton County (partial), McDonough
21County (partial). It includes the townships of Rock Island,
22Bowling, Edgington, Andalusia, Buffalo Prairie, and Drury;
23Eliza, Duncan, Perryton, Preemption, New Boston, Millersburg,
24Mercer, Greene, Keithsburg, Abington, Ohio Grove, and Suez;
25Henderson County, Bald Bluff, Oquawka, Rozetta, Biggsville,
26Gladstone, Carman, Stronghurst, Media, Lomax, Terre Haute, and

 

 

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1Raritan; Warren County, Sumner, Spring Grove, Hale, Tompkins,
2Ellison, and Point Pleasant; Hancock County, La Harpe, Durham,
3Dallas City, Pontoosuc, Appanoose, Nauvoo, Sonora, Rock Creek,
4Pilot Grove, Fountain Green, Hancock, Carthage, Prairie,
5Montebello, Warsaw, Rocky Run-Wilcox, Wythe, Walker, Bear
6Creek, St. Albans, Chili, Harmony, St. Mary, and Augusta;
7Adams County, Keene, Houston, and Northeast; Schuyler County,
8Birmingham, Huntsville, Brooklyn, Camden, Littleton, Buena
9Vista, Woodstock, Bainbridge, Rushville, Frederick, Oakland,
10Browning; in Mason County, Allens Grove, Bath, Crane Creek,
11Forest City, Havana, Kilbourne, Lynchburg, Manito, Mason City,
12Pennsylvania, Quiver, Salt Creek, Sherman; Tazewell County,
13Spring Lake and Malone; in Fulton County, Astoria, Banner,
14Bernadotte, Buckheart, Cass, Deerfield, Ellisville, Fairview,
15Farmers, Harris, Isabel, Joshua, Kerton, Lee, Lewistown,
16Liverpool, Pleasant, Putman, Union, Vermont, Waterford,
17Woodland, and Young Hickory; McDonough County, Bethel,
18Blandinsville, Chalmers, Colchester, Eldorado, Hire, Industry,
19Lamoine, Macomb City, New Salem, Sciota, Scotland, and
20Tennessee. Menard County does not have the township form of
21government. The precincts from Menard County in proposed RD 94
22are Athens North No. 2, Athens South No. 1, Atterberry No. 10,
23Greenview No. 6, Indian Creek No. 7, Oakford No. 9, Petersburg
24East No. 13, Petersburg North No. 14, Petersburg South No. 15,
25Petersburg West No. 16, Rock Creek No. 12, Sandridge No. 8,
26Sugar Grove No. 5, Tallula No. 11. To gain population and

 

 

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1account for population shifts in neighboring districts,
2proposed RD 94 gains population to the east and west and loses
3population to the south.
4    The proposed district has a total population of 108,311,
5with an African American citizen voting-age population of
6.90%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 1.2%, and an
7Asian citizen voting-age population of .30%.
8    Representative District 95 was underpopulated by more than
94,000. Proposed district 95 has its most north point on the
10southside of Sherman and contains the northern, western and
11southern outskirts of Springfield. Counties contained in the
12proposed district are Sangamon, Macon and Christian.
13Springfield and Taylorville municipalities are inside the
14proposed RD 95. Portions of Springfield and Taylorville in the
15proposed district have similar demographics.
16    The proposed district has a total population of 108,180,
17with an African American citizen voting-age population of
187.4%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 1.5%, and an
19Asian citizen voting-age population of 1.4%.
20    Representative District 99, which is the former RD 100,
21was underpopulated by more than 4,300. It includes portions of
22Kass, Morgan, Brown and Adams counties. The east border of the
23district is the Missouri-Illinois state lines with the west
24border of the district has Meredosia, the very southern part
25of Spring Valley and Liberty. This district was drawn to keep
26communities of similar economic interest together. The median

 

 

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1income for Jacksonville, Quincy and Beardstown is between
2$40,750 and $46,189.
3    The proposed district has a total population of 108,171,
4with an African American citizen voting-age population of 6%,
5a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 2.5%, and an Asian
6citizen voting-age population of .5%.
7    Representative District 100 was underpopulated by 4,339.
8It includes the parts of Adams, Scott, Pike, Morgan Green,
9Macoupin, Calhoun, Jersey, and Madison counties. Rural parts
10of Godfrey, Foster and Fort Russell townships in Madison
11County are in proposed RD 100 that are in current 111, this
12places them in a more rural district that better matches those
13areas than the more urban and industrial parts of current and
14proposed RD 111. The district boundaries follow the Missouri
15and Illinois borders and unite a plethora of Riverfront
16communities. The proposed district has a total population of
17108,142, with an African American citizen voting-age
18population of 1.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population
19of 1%, and an Asian citizen voting-age population of .4%.
20    Southern Illinois: The Southern Illinois region sustained
21some of the largest population losses in the State, and House
22districts required significant reconfiguration to create
23compact districts of substantially equal population.
24    Representative District 109 has shifted significantly to
25accommodate new population. The proposed district will include
26all of Bond County and parts of Madison, Clinton, St. Clair,

 

 

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1Washington, and Fayette Counties. These counties are
2well-paired economically, with relatively consistent median
3household incomes throughout the group. Incomes range from
4$52,200 in Bond County to $63,900 in Clinton County. Townships
5in split counties are Vandalia, Bear Grove, Otego, and
6Kaskaskia, St. Rose, Wheatfield, Irishtown, East Fork,
7Meridian, Clement, Wade, Clement, Breese, Sugar Creek, Looking
8Glass, Germantown, Wade, Meridian, Helvetia, Marine, Jarvis,
9Pin Oak, Saline, St. Jacob in Madison County as well as other
10parts of St. Clair in proposed RD 109 include parts of O'Fallon
11small parts of Lebanon, and small parts of Mascoutah (mostly
12outskirts and subdivisions) All major areas of the proposed RD
13109 are densely populated by people with German ancestry. St.
14Clair County, at the lowest, is 23.9% German-ancestry while
15Clinton goes as high as 51.2%. This is uniform across the
16district. Maintaining cultural cohesion will lead to a more
17unified district whose goals and priorities can be
18well-represented by their elected officials.
19    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
20Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made
21public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican
22state representatives whose primary residences were located in
23the same representative district as another incumbent
24Republican state representative. This new proposed district
25boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
26proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request

 

 

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1of Republicans, RD 110 was reconfigured to include
2Representative Wilhour's home.
3    The proposed district has a total population of 108,249,
4with an African American citizen voting-age population of
53.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 2.1%, and an
6Asian citizen voting-age population of .7%.
7    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
8Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made
9public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican
10state representatives whose primary residences were located in
11the same representative district as another incumbent
12Republican state representative. This new proposed district
13boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
14proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request
15of Republicans, RD 109 was reconfigured to include
16Representative Meier's home.
17    Representative District 110 was under populated by over
184,500 people. RD 110 is in Marion, Clay, Richland, Edwards,
19and Wabash counties, with parts of Clinton, Fayette,
20Effingham, and Wayne counties. This area shares similar
21socioeconomic interests with median income ranging from
22$43,400 to $63,300. RD 110 is an area with a high
23German-ancestry population. Crafting districts to maintain
24ethnic backgrounds will help reinforce traditions and culture
25along district lines. Regional traditions celebrating German
26heritage, such as Schweizer Fest. The southeast side of RD 110

 

 

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1runs along the border with Indiana. The South side connects
2Calvin, Fairfield, Orchardville, and Kell, stopping near
3Sandoval. Highway 51 follows the West side until the western
4border tapers East near Vernon. RD 110 is farthest north at St.
5Elmo. The North to Northeast edge of the district follows from
6there to Bible Grove, Wakefield, Claremont, Lancaster and
7ultimately Allendale where it meets the Indiana border. The
8proposed district has a total population of 108,277, with an
9African American citizen voting-age population of 2.8%, a
10Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 1.1%, and an Asian
11citizen voting-age population of .4%.
12    Representative District 115 is the core of the current RD
13116, which lost population of 1,022. The proposed district
14contains all of Monroe and Randolph counties and portions of
15Clinton Jackson, St. Clair, and Washington counties, and the
16municipalities of Gorham, Murphysboro, Vergennes, Ava,
17Campbell Hill, Rockwood, Percy, Steeleville, Chester,
18Kaskaskia, Ellis Grove, Evansville, Ruma, Sparta,
19Coulterville, Tilden, Oakdale, Baldwin, Red Bud, Marissa,
20Lenzburg, New Athens, Hecker, Fayetteville, St. Libory,
21Venedy, Addieville, Mayestown, Valmeyer, Waterloo, Columbia,
22Dupo, Nashville, New Minden, Hoyleton, Bartelso, Hoffman, and
23Wamac. Within the proposed RD 115, the Jackson County portion
24contains all of Murphysboro, Sand Ridge, Fountain Bluff,
25Degognia, Kinkaid, Levan, Somerset, Vergennes, Ora, and
26Bradley townships.

 

 

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1    Proposed RD 115 contains the following townships in St.
2Clair County: Lenzburg, Marissa, Fayetteville, New Athens, and
3Prairie Du Long. It also contains a portion of Millstadt
4Township in St. Clair County that is coterminous with
5Millstadt 3 precinct for population purposes.
6    Proposed RD 115 contains portions of Du Bois and Ashley
7townships in Washington County. These are west of Route 51 and
8south of the Louisville and Nashville rail line. It also
9contains portions of Irvington Township north of Walnut Hill
10Road. It also contains the following townships in Washington
11County: Bolo, Pilot Knob, Oakdale, Lively Grove, Johannisburg,
12Plum Hill, Nashville, Beaucoup, Hoyleton, and Covington.
13Proposed RD 15 also contains the Venedy municipal portion of
14Venedy Township and the Addieville municipal portion of
15Okawville Township. Both municipalities cross township lines
16and this keeps these municipal portions in a single
17representative and legislative district. Proposed RD 115
18contains Sante Fe and Lake townships in Clinton County.
19    Proposed RD 115 has an agricultural community of interest
20and a recreational and tourism community of interest that
21includes Kinkaid Lake, Lake Murphysboro State Park, Middle
22Mississippi River National Wildlife Refuge, Piney Creek Ravine
23Nature Preserve, Kaskaskia, which was the first State capital
24of Illinois, Randolph County State Recreation Area, and
25Washington County State Recreation Area. Proposed RD 115 also
26contains the Misselhorn Art Gallery in Sparta, which occupies

 

 

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1a former train depot used as a filming location in 1967's In
2The Heat of the Night, which the Library of Congress placed on
3the National Film Registry.
4    Partisan advantage is largely the same as the current RD
5115.
6    The proposed district has a total population of 108,104,
7with the African American citizen voting-age population is 5%,
8the Hispanic voting-age population is 1.5% and the Asian
9voting-age population is 0.60%.
10    Representative District 116 is comprised of parts of
11former RDs 109, 115, 117, and 118. Proposed RD 116 contains all
12of Perry County, Jefferson County, and White County while
13containing portions of Washington, Franklin, Hamilton, and
14Wayne counties. Within Washington County, DuBois Township is
15split along Route 51 for population purposes, Ashley Township
16is split along Route 51 (east of the north-south portion) and
17north of the Louisville and Nashville rail line) for
18population purposes, and Irvington Township is split at Walnut
19Hill Road for population purposes. In Franklin County and
20Hamilton County, no townships are split. In Wayne County,
21Barnhill Township is split at Route 45 for population
22purposes, with proposed RD 116 picking up areas east of Route
2345. Big Mound Township is split to keep all but a single
24unpopulated portion of Fairfield together in proposed RD 110.
25In Lamard Township, proposed RD 116 keeps everything west of
26Route 45 except for the central portions of Jeffersonville

 

 

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1east of Route 45 which are also in proposed RD 116. These
2adjustments help make proposed RD 116 more compact than
3current RD 116. Partisan advantage is largely the same as the
4current RD 116. Areas in proposed RD 116 have largely similar
5demographics, per capita income, rate of people living in
6poverty, average travel time to work, owner-occupied housing
7rate, mortgage costs, and rental housing costs according to
8American Community Survey data. Primary economic communities
9of interest include the agriculture industry and the energy
10industry. Counties in the proposed RD 116 have much higher
11than average shares of workers in these industries compared to
12the rest of the State. Proposed RD 116 contains the following
13municipalities: Buckner, Christopher, Cutler, Du Quoin, St.
14Johns, Tamaroa, Du Bois, Radom, Ashley, Richview, Irvington,
15Pinckneyville, Willisville, North City, Valier, Sesser,
16Benton, West City, Hanaford, Ewing, Macedonia, Ina, Nason,
17Bonnie, Waltonville, Woodlawn, Mt. Vernon, Bonnie, Dix, Belle
18Rive, Dahlgren, Bluford, Keenes, Wayne City, Sims,
19Jeffersonville, Fairfield, Belle Prairie, McLeansboro,
20Enfield, Springerton, Mill Shoals, Burnt Prairie, Carmi,
21Norris City, Maunie, Phillipstown, Crossville, and Grayville.
22Proposed RD 116 unites the city of Du Quoin, which is the home
23of the annual Du Quoin State Fair. In addition to the Du Quoin
24State Fair, other cultural attractions include Rend Lake
25recreational areas, Pyramid State Recreation Area, Mt. Vernon
26Game Propagation Center, and the Hamilton County State Fish &

 

 

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1Wildlife Area. Proposed RD 116 unites McLeansboro. Proposed RD
2116 splits Graysville at the county line of Edwards County and
3White County, which runs through Graysville.
4    Following the release of the proposed legislative map on
5Friday, May 21, 2021, Republican state representatives made
6public comments criticizing the number of incumbent Republican
7state representatives whose primary residences were located in
8the same representative district as another incumbent
9Republican state representative. This new proposed district
10boundary therefore changed boundaries from the original
11proposal district from Friday, May 21. Following the request
12of Republicans, RD 116 was reconfigured to put Representative
13Meier's home in RD 109, while keeping Representative Friess'
14home in 116.
15    The proposed district has a total population of 108,288,
16with an African American citizen voting-age population of
175.3%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 1.9%, and an
18Asian citizen voting-age population of .5%.
19    Representative District 117 was overpopulated by 368. It
20keeps together Pope, Massac, Johnson, Hardin, Gallatin, and
21Saline Counties. Split counties of Williamson, Franklin, and
22Hamilton are mostly split along township lines keeping
23Mayberry, Twigg, Cave, Frankfort, Southern, Flannigan, South
24Flannigan. Frankfort, West Marion and Herrin townships are the
25only split townships in proposed 117 to help ensure
26compactness and keep most municipalities together. Most of

 

 

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1these township slips are along current precinct lines. Only
2Frankfort is considerably split and it ensures an equal
3population between districts. All of the counties in proposed
4117 have similar median household incomes with the counties
5ranging from $39k-$44k. Including places like Marion with
6median household income of $44.4k Proposed RD 117 includes
7mostly rural areas along with two of the larger population
8centers in Southern Illinois of Marion and Harrisburg. It also
9includes a large part of Shawnee National Forest and follows
10the Wabash and Ohio rivers that also make up the state's
11borders.
12    The proposed district has a total population of 108,076,
13with an African American citizen voting-age population of
145.2%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 1.4%, and an
15Asian citizen voting-age population of .2%.
16    Proposed RD 118 contains parts of former RDs 116, 117, and
17118. The proposed district includes the entirety of Pulaski,
18Alexander, and Union counties. Proposed RD 118 splits Jackson,
19Franklin, and Williamson counties, largely keeping townships
20and municipalities whole. It contains all of Carbondale, Elk,
21De Soto, Makanda, Pomona, Grand Tower, Six Mile, Denning,
22Blairsville, Carterville, and Grassy townships, along with
23parts of Frankfort, Herrin, and West Marion townships.
24Southern Illinois has a strong regional identity, driven in no
25small part by Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. The
26University continues to be an economic engine as one of the

 

 

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1leading research universities in the State and a major
2employer for the area. Proposed RD 118 unites the entirety of
3the City of Carbondale and Southern Illinois University
4Carbondale Campus into one Representative District where both
5are currently divided into two Representative Districts and
6two Legislative Districts. In addition to the University,
7Proposed RD 118 includes John A. Logan Community College
8whereas it is currently in a different district than the two
9districts including the University. Southern Illinois and
10proposed RD 118 has unique geography that is also a source of
11tourism. Proposed RD 118 includes Giant City State Park and
12parts of the Shawnee National Forest. There are also multiple
13manmade lakes in proposed RD 118 widely used for recreation in
14the region including Little Grassy Lake, Crab Orchard Lake,
15Devils Kitchen Lake, and Cedar Lake. Proposed RD 118 also
16includes all of the Shawnee Hills Wine Trail, a collection of
17local wineries attracting tourists from the State and spurring
18further economic development in the region. Proposed RD 118
19connects Southern Illinois communities with larger minority
20populations such as Pulaski, Mounds, Cairo, Mound City, Tamms,
21Carbondale, Ullin, and Thebes. This comes from testimony
22provided by Dr. Linda Flowers, President of the Carbondale
23NAACP during the Carbondale Redistricting hearing on April 19,
242021.
25    The proposed district has a total population of 108,305
26with an African American citizen voting-age population of

 

 

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111.0%, a Hispanic citizen voting-age population of 2.8%, and
2an Asian citizen voting-age population 1.0%; and be it further
 
3    RESOLVED, That this House Resolution adopts and
4incorporates by reference the provisions of Senate Resolution
5326 of the 102nd General Assembly.