TITLE 77: PUBLIC HEALTH
CHAPTER I: DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SUBCHAPTER c: LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES
PART 390 LONG-TERM CARE FOR UNDER AGE 22 FACILITIES CODE
SECTION 390.TABLE B DAILY NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS BY AGE GROUP



Section 390.TABLE B Daily Nutritional Requirements By Age Group

 

Average Size Serving of Food for Various Age Levels

 

Food Group

No. of Servings Per Day

Size of Servings Per Age Group

1-2 Yrs

2-4 Yrs.

4-6 Yrs.

*Milk and Milk Products

4

cup

to

to 1 cup

**Meat Group

At least 3

 

 

 

Lean meat, fish, poultry

 

2 tbsp.

2-4 tbsp.

2-3 oz.

Eggs

 

1

1

1

Natural or Processed Cheese

 

1 oz.

1 oz.

2 oz.

Cottage Cheese

 

1-2 tbsp.

2-4 tbsp.

- cup

Dried Peas, Beans

 

1-2 tbsp.

2-4 tbsp.

- cup

Peanut Butter

 

None

1 tbsp.

1-2 tbsp.

 

* Cheese and ice cream may be used to replace part of the milk. Equivalents, figured on the basis of calcium, are as follows:

1 inch cube cheddar cheese = cup milk

2/3 cup of cottage cheese = cup milk

1 cup ice cream = cup milk

 

If cheese is used as a serving of milk, it may not be also counted as a serving of protein in the meat group.

 

Milk should be fortified with Vitamin D or Vitamin D prescribed as a supplement by the attending physician.

 

** Liver is an excellent source of Vitamin A and Iron. It is recommended, but not required, that liver be served at least once a week.


 

Food Group

*No. of Servings Per Day

Size of Servings Per Age Group

6-12 Yrs

12-18 Yrs

18 Yrs & Over

**Milk and Milk Products

4

1 cup

1 cup

1 cup 2 or more servings (Minimum of 16 oz. per day)

***Meat Group

At least 3

 

 

 

Lean meat, fish, poultry

 

3-4 oz.

4 oz. or more

2-3 oz. (Minimum of six (6) ounces)

Eggs

 

1

1 or more

 

Natural or Processed Cheese

 

2-3 oz.

3 oz. or more

 

Cottage Cheese

 

cup

cup or more

 

Dried Peas, Beans

 

- c.

cup or more

 

Peanut Butter

 

2-3 tbsp.

3 tbsp.

 

 

* Number of Servings vary for age 18 and over. Note differences under that age category.

 

** Cheese and ice cream may be used to replace part of the milk. Equivalents, figured on the basis of calcium, are as follows:

 

1 inch cube cheddar cheese = cup milk

 

2/3 cup of cottage cheese = cup milk

 

1 cup ice cream = cup milk

 

If cheese is used as a serving of milk, it may not be also counted as a serving of protein in the meat group.

 

Milk should be fortified with Vitamin D or Vitamin D prescribed as a supplement by the attending physician.

 

*** Liver is an excellent source of Vitamin A and Iron. It is recommended, but not required that liver be served at least once a week.

 

 

Fruit and Vegetable Group

 

5-9 Months

Do not begin before 5 months

 

 

Plain, strained spinach, green beans, peas, carrots, squash, asparagus, beets. (No fats)

Start with vegetables. Introduce one at a time. Start with a teaspoon and increase to 1-4 tablespoons fruit and a vegetable two times daily. Do not add salt or sugar.

Strained, unsweetened fruit juices, such as apple or cherry, at first 2-3 ounces with equal parts of water. Increase to cup by 6 months. Begin strained fruits such as apricot, peach, pear, apple sauce, mashed ripe banana, about 1 month after vegetables. Delay orange juice until six (6) months.

 

9-12 Months

Continue a variety of vegetables, including white potatoes, and a variety of fruits. May offer small pieces of raw, ripe peeled fruits as finger foods. Do not give berries or other fruits with seeds, pits or their skin.

 

Bread and Cereal Group

Do not begin before 4 months

4-6 Months

1-4 tablespoons cereal daily

Infant cereals rice, oatmeal, barley, mix and then with iron-fortified formula.

 

6-9 Months

Continue infant cereal. May give mixed infant cereals after plain has been given for a period of time. May add dry toast, melba toast, Zwieback or crackers for teething.

 

9-12 Months

Continue a variety of infant cereals and breads. Unsweetened, adult-type cereals may be used as finger foods.

 

*NOTE

The American Academy of Pediatrics and other leaders in infant feeding practices recommend that solid foods be delayed until 4 to 6 months for the following reasons:

 

1.

Added calories from solid foods may cause babies to be overweight.

 

2.

Solid foods given too soon may replace intake of important nutrients from breast milk or iron fortified formula.

 

3.

Food allergies appear more often among infants who receive solid foods very early.

 

4.

Infant's digestive system may not easily manage solid foods at an early age.

 

The information on feeding the infant from birth to one year is a guideline to follow in the event the attending physician/pediatrician does not prescribe a feeding schedule in regard to kinds and amounts of food to be served at the various age levels.

 

Offer baby unsweetened, cooled, boiled water three to four times a day. This is especially important in hot weather.

 

Reference: American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition, "On the Feeding of Supplemental Foods to Infants," Pediatrics, Vol. 65, No. 6, June 1980.

 

 

No. of Servings

Size of Servings Per Age Group

Food Group

Per Day

1-2 Yrs

2-4 Yrs.

4-6 Yrs.

Fruit and Vegetable Group

At least 2 fruits and 3 vegetables

 

 

 

Vitamin C Source

1 or more

⅓- cup

cup

cup

Vitamin A Source

1 or more

2-3 tbsp.

3-4 tbsp.

-⅓ cup

Other Vegetables

Asparagus, green beans, wax beans, beets, cauliflower, corn, peas, potatoes

 

2-3 tbsp.

3-4 tbsp.

-⅓ cup

Other Fruits

Apple, banana, peach, pear, pineapple, plums

 

cup or equal in whole fresh fruit

⅓- cup or equal in whole fresh fruit

cup or equal in whole fresh fruit

 

Good sources of Vitamin C fruits and vegetables: grapefruit, grapefruit juice, orange, orange juice, cantaloupe, raw strawberries, broccoli, brussel sprouts, green pepper, sweet red pepper.

 

Fair Source of Vitamin C (need twice as much as a good source): raw cabbage, collards, kale, kohlrabi, mustard greens, potatoes, spinach, tomatoes, tomato juice, turnip greens.

 

Good source of Vitamin A fruits and vegetables: apricots, broccoli, cantaloupe, carrots, chard, collards, kale, persimmon, pumpkin, spinach, sweet potato, turnip greens, and other dark green leafy vegetables, winter squash.

 

NOTE: To insure variety, any vegetable or fruit repeated for the day shall not be counted as one of the required number of servings in the fruit and vegetable group.

 

 

No. of Servings

Size of Servings Per Age Group

Food Group

Per Day

6-12 Yrs

12-18 Yrs

18 Yrs & Over

Fruit and Vegetable Group

At least 2 fruits and 3 vegetables

 

 

 

Vitamin C Source

1 or more

cup

cup

cup (1 or more servings)

Vitamin A Source

1 or more

⅓- cup

- cup

cup (1 or more servings)

Other Vegetables

Asparagus, green beans, wax beans, beets, cauliflower, corn, peas, potatoes

 

⅓- cup

- cup

cup

Other Fruits

Apple, banana, peach, pear, pineapple, plums

 

cup or equal in whole fresh fruit

cup or equal in whole fresh fruit

cup or equal in whole fresh fruit

 

Good sources of Vitamin C fruits and vegetables: grapefruit, grapefruit juice, orange, orange juice, cantaloupe, raw strawberries, broccoli, brussel sprouts, green pepper, sweet red pepper.

 

Fair Source of Vitamin C (need twice as much as a good source): raw cabbage, collards, kale, kohlrabi, mustard greens, potatoes, spinach, tomatoes, tomato juice, turnip greens.

 

Good source of Vitamin A fruits and vegetables: apricots, broccoli, cantaloupe, carrots, chard, collards, kale, persimmon, pumpkin, spinach, sweet potato, turnip greens, and other dark green leafy vegetables, winter squash.

 

NOTE: To insure variety, any vegetable or fruit repeated for the day shall not be counted as one of the required number of servings in the fruit and vegetable group.

 

 

No. of Servings

Size of Servings Per Age Group

Food Group

Per Day

1-2 Yrs.

2-4 Yrs.

4-6 Yrs.

Bread and Cereal Group

4 or More

Bread

-1 slice

1-1 slices

1-2 slices

 

Cooked Cereal

-⅓ cups

⅓- cups

cups

 

Ready to eat Cereal

- oz.

-1 oz.

1 oz.

 

Rice, Macaroni, Spaghetti, Other Pasta

-⅓ cups

⅓- cups

cups

 

Butter or Margarine

1-4 Tbsp. (Used as Spreads & in cooking)

1 tbsp.

1 tbsp.

1 tbsp.

1 tablespoon butter, margarine = 135 calories.

Other Foods

To meet calorie needs, round out meals, satisfy individual appetites and improve flavor.

Dessert and Sweets

Ice Cream

Gelatin dessert

Pudding, custard

Cookies, cake pie

Jellies, jams

Honey, syrup, sugar

Portion of desserts and sweets will vary with the age of the child.

Fats

Mayonnaise, oil (1 tbsp. mayonnaise = 135 calories)

Bacon (1 strip bacon = 45 calories)

 

 

No. of Servings

Size of Servings Per Age Group

Food Group

Per Day

6-12 Yrs.

12-18 Yrs.

18 Yrs & Over.

Bread and Cereal Group

4 or More

Bread

 

2 slices

2 slices

1-2 slices

Cooked Cereal

 

- cups

-1 cup

cup

Ready to eat Cereal

 

1 oz.

1 oz.

1 oz.

Rice, Macaroni, Spaghetti, Other Pasta

 

- cups

-1 cup

cup

Butter or Margarine

1-4 Tbsp. (Used as Spreads & in cooking)

2 tbsp.

2-4 tbsp.

2 or more

1 tablespoon butter, margarine = 135 calories.

Other Foods

To meet calorie needs, round out meals, satisfy individual appetites and improve flavor.

Dessert and Sweets

Ice Cream

Gelatin dessert

Pudding, custard

Cookies, cake pie

Jellies, jams

Honey, syrup, sugar

Portion of desserts and sweets will vary with the age of the child.

 

Fats

Mayonnaise, oil

(1 tbsp. mayonnaise = 135 calories)

Bacon

(1 strip bacon = 45 calories)