TITLE 41: FIRE PROTECTION
CHAPTER I: OFFICE OF THE STATE FIRE MARSHAL
PART 100 FIRE PREVENTION AND SAFETY
SECTION 100.7 ADOPTION OF NFPA 101, CODES AND STANDARDS


 

Section 100.7 Adoption of NFPA 101, Codes and Standards

a) OSFM hereby adopts the nationally-recognized standards, codes and guides listed as incorporated standards in subsection (b), subject to OSFM modifications listed in subsection (c). Standards incorporated by reference in this Part do not include any later editions or amendments, unless explicitly stated otherwise in this Part.

 

b) Incorporated Standards

National Fire Protection Association

Batterymarch Park

Quincy MA 02269

 

NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015) (adopted in its entirety, subject to the OSFM modifications in subsection (c)).

 

NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2000) (only to the extent cited in subsections (c)(1), (c)(2) and (c)(6)).

 

NFPA 101A, Guide on Alternative Approaches to Life Safety (2016).

 

NFPA 101A, Guide on Alternative Approaches to Life Safety (2001) (only to the extent cited in subsection (c)(1)).

 

NFPA 914, Code for Fire Protection of Historic Structures (2010) (only to the extent cited in Section 100.8).

 

NFPA 80, Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives (2013) (only to the extent cited in subsection (c)(10)(I)).

 

NFPA 1, Fire Code (2015) (only to the extent cited in subsection (c)(11)).

 

c) Modifications to the Life Safety Code

 

1) High Rise Buildings

All existing high rise buildings, as defined in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (all applicable Sections), shall comply with the sprinkler requirements prescribed in the 2000 edition of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, effective January 1, 2002. Use of a Fire Safety Evaluation System (FSES) for compliance with this Section must adhere to NFPA 101A, Guide on Alternative Approaches to Life Safety (2001).

 

2) Assembly Occupancies

All existing assembly occupancies, as defined in NFPA 101 (Chapter 13), shall comply with the sprinkler requirements prescribed in the 2000 edition of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, effective January 1, 2002.

 

3) Day Care Occupancies

 

A) Child Care Facilities (see the Child Care Act of 1969 [225 ILCS 101])

 

i) For purposes of determining the occupancy subclassification of a day care facility, the current version of the following Department of Children and Family Services rules will be applied: 89 Ill. Adm. Code 406, 407 and 408. This is applicable to licensed and nonlicensed facilities.

 

ii) Child-to-staff ratios in day care facilities shall comply with 89 Ill. Adm. Code 406, 407 and 408 and with the Child Care Act of 1969 [225 ILCS 10]. Any conflicting provisions of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code are inapplicable to day care facilities.

 

iii) In day care homes in which clients occupy a level below the level of exit discharge, means of escape shall be provided in accordance with either the applicable requirements of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015) or with one of the following:

 

If a means of escape discharging directly to the outside at the basement level is not provided, requiring occupants to traverse another level of the home to exit, the path of escape through the level of exit discharge shall be separated from the remainder of that level of the home by construction providing a minimum fire resistance rating of 1-hour; or

 

The home shall be equipped with smoke alarms permanently powered by the building's electrical system and wired so that the actuation of one smoke alarm will actuate all the smoke alarms in the dwelling. At least one such smoke alarm shall be located on each level of the occupancy (excluding unoccupied attics and crawl spaces), and the path of escape through the level of exit discharge (from the basement door to the exterior door of the home) must be protected by automatic fire sprinklers. Listed residential sprinklers shall be used and the installation shall be made in accordance with 41 Ill. Adm. Code 109 and codes and standards referenced in that Part.

 

B) Windows for Rescue in Existing Day Care Centers

Windows for rescue required by NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015), Section 17.2.11.1, are not required for existing day care centers.

 

C) Day Care Homes − New and Existing

Day care homes shall be defined as new and existing based on the date the original home construction was completed and available for residency.

 

D) Smoke Detection in Corridors Outside Day Care Homes Located Within a Building of Another Occupancy

A smoke alarm system installed as prescribed in this subsection (c)(3)(D) shall be permitted to be used in day care homes located within a building of another occupancy in lieu of a smoke detection system connected to a fire alarm system as required by NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015), Sections 16.6.3.4.2 and 17.6.3.4.2:

 

i) Smoke alarms connected to the building's electric shall be installed in accordance with proper coverage standards in the corridor serving the day care home.

 

ii) Smoke alarms connected to the building's electric shall be installed in accordance with proper coverage standards within the day care home (see NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015)), Section 16.6.3.4 for new day care homes and Section 17.6.3.4 for existing day care homes) as well as within 15 ft of all sleeping rooms. NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015), Section 17.6.3.4.4 shall not be permitted to be used.

 

iii) All smoke alarms regulated by subsections (c)(3)(D)(i) and (ii) will be arranged so that operation of any smoke alarm shall cause all smoke alarms within the corridor and the day care home to sound.

 

4) One- and Two-Family Dwellings

NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015), Chapter 24 (One- and Two-Family Dwellings) is adopted as recommended guidelines only, except when referenced as being required for compliance with this Part.

 

5) Communicating Spaces

Corridors shall not be required to be separated from communicating spaces as required in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015), Section 8.6.6, in new or existing occupancies, provided all of the following criteria are met:

 

A) The arrangement complies with all other requirements of Section 8.6.6(4), including, if applicable, 8.6.6(4)(b);

 

B) The building is protected throughout by an approved automatic sprinkler system; and

 

C) Two means of egress are provided to occupants of the building on each floor that is served by the communicating opening that do not require the use of the stairway located within the communicating space, as defined in NFPA 101, Section 8.6.6.

 

6) Mixed Occupancies

All existing mixed occupancies, as defined by NFPA 101, Life Safety Code, shall, at minimum, continue to comply with the requirements of Section 6.1.14 of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2000), effective January 1, 2002, but shall also be permitted to comply with the requirements of Section 6.1.14 of NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015).

 

7) Determination of "Story" in Occupancies

The criteria for what a "story level" is, as found in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015), Section 16.1.1.8 and 17.1.1.8 are permitted to be used for all occupancies found in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015).

 

8) Use of NFPA 101A for Apartment Building Occupancies

NFPA 101A, Guide on Alternative Approaches to Life Safety (2016), Sections 7.6 and 7.7, may be used to demonstrate equivalent protection in apartment buildings, regardless of whether they contain board and care occupancies or house board and care clients receiving personal care services.

 

9) Means of Egress Design to Travel to Direct Exits and Travel to Windows for Rescue in Educational Occupancies and Day Care Centers

Travel to exits or to windows for rescue shall be permitted as follows in educational occupancies and day care centers:

 

A) Travel directly from one room through adjoining rooms to reach an exit without entering a corridor may be permitted as long as the travel distance does not exceed 150 ft and doors located between the rooms are not locked or obstructed and other requirements found in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015) are met.

 

B) Travel directly from one room through adjoining rooms without entering a corridor to reach a window for rescue may be permitted as long as the travel distance does not exceed 75 ft and doors located between the rooms are not locked or obstructed and other requirements found in NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015) are met.

 

C) Travel may be considered to be within a single room if two or more rooms are connected using openings that are at least 60 inches in clear width without any doors.

 

10) Door Locking to Prevent Unwanted Entry

Occupancies shall be permitted to provide locking to prevent unwanted entry as long as all of the following requirements are met:

 

A) The locking means is approved and complies with NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015);

 

B) The locking means can be engaged without opening the door;

 

C) The unlocking and unlatching from the occupied side of the door can be accomplished without the use of a key or tool;

 

D) For existing occupancies only, the unlocking and unlatching requires not more than two releasing operations. For new occupancies, unlocking and unlatching requires no more than one releasing operation;

 

E) The unlocking and unlatching means are mounted at a height not exceeding 48 inches above the finished floor;

 

F) Locks, if remotely engaged, can be unlocked from the occupied side;

 

G) The door is capable of being unlocked and opened from outside the room by staff with the necessary key or other credential;

 

H) The locking means does not modify the door closer, panic hardware, or fire exit hardware;

 

I) Modifications to fire door assemblies, including door hardware, shall be in accordance with NFPA 80, Standard for Fire Doors and Other Opening Protectives (2013);

 

J) The emergency response plan addresses the use of the locking and unlocking means from within and outside the room;

 

K) Staff is drilled in the engagement and release of the locking means, from within and outside the room, as part of the emergency response plan; and

 

L) If doors are replaced, the new door shall comply with unlocking and unlatching that does not require more than one releasing operation.

 

11) Use of Combustible Vegetation in Buildings

Combustible vegetation within buildings shall comply with NFPA 1, Fire Code (2015), Section 10.13.

 

12) Windows for Rescue and Windows Used as a Secondary Means of Escape

Where windows for rescue are required or where they are used as a secondary means of escape, the bottom sill of the window shall be not more than 44 inches above the floor as required by NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015), or a permanently fixed stair or ramp shall be installed at the window to allow occupants to be within 44 inches of the bottom window sill when standing atop the stair or ramp. The stair or ramp shall be at least the width of the window or a minimum of 36 inches in width, whichever is larger.

 

13) Size and Access to Secondary Means of Escape

If a window is used as a secondary means of escape as permitted by NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015) and the size is not in accordance with NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (2015), the owner or operator of the facility using this window as a secondary means of escape must demonstrate to an on-site representative of OSFM that all occupants (staff and clients) can escape through the window to the exterior of the facility in 3 minutes or less.

 

d) The materials incorporated by this Section are on file with OSFM at the following locations:

 

1035 Stevenson Drive

Springfield IL 62703-4259

 

James R. Thompson Center

100 W. Randolph Street, Ste. 4-600

Chicago IL 60601

 

(Source: Amended at 43 Ill. Reg. 10008, effective January 1, 2020)