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Illinois Compiled Statutes

Information maintained by the Legislative Reference Bureau
Updating the database of the Illinois Compiled Statutes (ILCS) is an ongoing process. Recent laws may not yet be included in the ILCS database, but they are found on this site as Public Acts soon after they become law. For information concerning the relationship between statutes and Public Acts, refer to the Guide.

Because the statute database is maintained primarily for legislative drafting purposes, statutory changes are sometimes included in the statute database before they take effect. If the source note at the end of a Section of the statutes includes a Public Act that has not yet taken effect, the version of the law that is currently in effect may have already been removed from the database and you should refer to that Public Act to see the changes made to the current law.

SCHOOLS
(105 ILCS 126/) Childhood Hunger Relief Act.

105 ILCS 126/1

    (105 ILCS 126/1)
    Sec. 1. Short title. This Act may be cited as the Childhood Hunger Relief Act.
(Source: P.A. 93-1086, eff. 2-15-05.)

105 ILCS 126/5

    (105 ILCS 126/5)
    Sec. 5. State policy and legislative intent. The General Assembly recognizes that hunger and food security are serious problems in the State of Illinois with as many as one million citizens being affected. These citizens have lost their sense of food security. Food insecurity occurs whenever the availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods or the ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways is limited or uncertain. Hunger is a painful or uneasy sensation caused by a recurrent or involuntary lack of food and is a potential, although not necessary, consequence of food insecurity. Over time, hunger may result in malnutrition. It is estimated that just under 600,000 Illinois children experience hunger or food insecurity, meaning that they either go without eating meals, or their parents or guardians cannot provide the kinds of food they need. At present, the Illinois economy is steadily experiencing a 6% unemployment rate, people are being laid off who thought they had job security, and the unemployed are remaining unemployed beyond the terms of unemployment benefits. Emergency food providers throughout the State are experiencing an increase in the number of working poor families requesting emergency food. In October 2003, Illinois was ranked 48th in the nation in providing school breakfasts to low-income children of families who meet the criteria for free and reduced-price lunches. Because low-income children are not being adequately nourished, even to the point where many are arriving at school hungry, the General Assembly believes it is in the best interest of Illinois to utilize resources available through existing child nutrition programs, to the fullest extent possible.
    The General Assembly also recognizes a definite correlation between adequate child nutrition and a child's physical, emotional, and cognitive development. There is also a correlation between adequate nutrition and a child's ability to perform well in school. Documented research has proven that school breakfasts improve attendance and increase a child's readiness to learn. In this regard, the General Assembly realizes the importance of the National School Breakfast Program and the Summer Food Service Program as effective measures that must be widely implemented to ensure more adequate nutrition for Illinois children.
(Source: P.A. 93-1086, eff. 2-15-05.)

105 ILCS 126/10

    (105 ILCS 126/10)
    Sec. 10. Definitions. In this Act:
    "Hunger" means a symptom of poverty caused by a lack of resources that prevents the purchasing of a nutritionally adequate diet resulting in a chronic condition of being undernourished.
    "Food insecurity" means a limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods.
    "Food security" means ensured access to enough food for an active, healthy life.
    "School Breakfast Program" means the federal child nutrition entitlement program that helps serve nourishing low-cost breakfast meals to school children. In addition to cash assistance, participating schools get foods donated by and technical guidance from the United States Department of Agriculture. Payments to schools are higher for meals served to children who qualify, on the basis of family size and income, for free or reduced-price meals. The program is administered in Illinois by the State Board of Education.
    "Summer Food Service Program" means the federal child nutrition entitlement program that helps communities serve meals to needy children when school is not in session. The United States Department of Agriculture reimburses sponsors for operating costs of food services up to a specific maximum rate for each meal served. In addition, sponsors receive some reimbursement for planning and supervising expenses. The program in Illinois is administered by the State Board of Education.
(Source: P.A. 93-1086, eff. 2-15-05.)

105 ILCS 126/15

    (105 ILCS 126/15)
    Sec. 15. School breakfast program.
    (a) The board of education of each school district in this State shall implement and operate a school breakfast program in the next school year, if a breakfast program does not currently exist, in accordance with federal guidelines in each school building within its district in which at least 40% or more of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunches based upon the current year's October claim (for those schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program) or in which at least 40% or more of the students are classified as low-income according to the Fall Housing Data from the previous year (for those schools that do not participate in the National School Lunch Program).
    (b) School districts may charge students who do not meet federal criteria for free school meals for the breakfasts served to these students within the allowable limits set by federal regulations.
    (c) School breakfast programs established under this Section shall be supported entirely by federal funds and commodities, charges to students and other participants, and other available State and local resources, including under the School Breakfast and Lunch Program Act. Allowable costs for reimbursement to school districts, in accordance with the United States Department of Agriculture, include compensation of employees for the time devoted and identified specifically to implement the school breakfast program; the cost of materials acquired, consumed, or expended specifically to implement the school breakfast program; equipment and other approved capital expenditures necessary to implement the school breakfast program; and transportation expenses incurred specifically to implement and operate the school breakfast program.
    (d) A school district shall be allowed to opt out a school or schools from the school breakfast program requirement of this Section if it is determined that, due to circumstances specific to that school district, the expense reimbursement would not fully cover the costs of implementing and operating a school breakfast program. The school district shall petition its regional superintendent of schools by February 15 of each year to request to be exempt from operating the school breakfast program in the school or schools in the next school year. The petition shall include all legitimate costs associated with implementing and operating a school breakfast program, the estimated reimbursement from State and federal sources, and any unique circumstances the school district can verify that exist that would cause the implementation and operation of such a program to be cost prohibitive.
    The regional superintendent of schools shall review the petition. In accordance with the Open Meetings Act, he or she shall convene a public hearing to hear testimony from the school district and interested community members. The regional superintendent shall, by March 15 of each year, inform the school district of his or her decision, along with the reasons why the exemption was granted or denied, in writing. The regional superintendent must also send notification to the State Board of Education detailing which schools requested an exemption and the results. If the regional superintendent grants an exemption to the school district, then the school district is relieved from the requirement to establish and implement a school breakfast program in the school or schools granted an exemption for the next school year.
    If the regional superintendent of schools does not grant an exemption, then the school district shall implement and operate a school breakfast program in accordance with this Section by the first student attendance day of the next school year. However, the school district or a resident of the school district may by April 15 appeal the decision of the regional superintendent to the State Superintendent of Education. The State Superintendent shall hear appeals on the decisions of regional superintendents of schools no later than May 15 of each year. The State Superintendent shall make a final decision at the conclusion of the hearing on the school district's request for an exemption from the school breakfast program requirement. If the State Superintendent grants an exemption, then the school district is relieved from the requirement to implement and operate a school breakfast program in the school or schools granted an exemption for the next school year. If the State Superintendent does not grant an exemption, then the school district shall implement and operate a school breakfast program in accordance with this Section by the first student attendance day of the next school year.
    A school district may not attempt to opt out a school or schools from the school breakfast program requirement of this Section by requesting a waiver under Section 2-3.25g of the School Code.
(Source: P.A. 96-158, eff. 8-7-09.)

105 ILCS 126/16

    (105 ILCS 126/16)
    (This Section may contain text from a Public Act with a delayed effective date)
    Sec. 16. Breakfast after the bell program.
    (a) For the purposes of this Section, "breakfast after the bell" means breakfast is provided to children after the instructional day has officially begun. This term does not prohibit schools from also providing breakfast before the instructional day begins.
    (b) The board of education of each school district in this State shall implement and operate a breakfast after the bell program by the first school day of the next academic year after the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 99th General Assembly, if a breakfast after the bell program does not currently exist, in each school building within its district (1) in which at least 70% or more of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunches based upon the previous year's October claim (for those schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program); (2) in which at least 70% or more of the students are classified as low-income according to the Fall Housing Data from the previous year (for those schools that do not participate in the National School Lunch Program); or (3) that has an individual site percentage for free or reduced-price meals of 70% or more (for those schools using Provision 2 under Section 11(a)(1) of the federal Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act or the Community Eligibility Provision under Section 104(a) of the federal Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 to provide universal meals). If a school falls below the applicable 70% threshold for 2 consecutive years, it has the option to continue participating in the program, but is not required to do so.
    (c) Each school under this Section may determine the breakfast after the bell service model that best suits its students. Service models include, but are not limited to, breakfast in the classroom, grab and go breakfast, and second-chance breakfast.
    (d) School districts required to implement a breakfast after the bell program provided for under this Section that demonstrate that (i) they are delivering school breakfast effectively, as defined by 70% or more of free or reduced-price eligible students participating in the School Breakfast Program, or (ii) due to circumstances specific to that school district, the expense reimbursement would not fully cover the costs of implementing and operating a breakfast after the bell program may be relieved of the delivery model requirement provided for in this Section after a cost analysis is submitted to the board of education of the district, the board of education holds a public hearing, and the board of education passes a resolution that the district cannot afford to operate a breakfast after the bell program. The district shall post information that sets forth the time, date, place, and general subject matter of the public hearing on its website and notify the State Board of Education at least 14 days prior to the hearing.
    (e) Before the beginning of the next academic year after the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 99th General Assembly, the State Board of Education shall develop and distribute guidelines for the implementation of this Section, which must be in compliance with federal regulations governing the school breakfast program.
    (f) The State Board of Education shall annually collect information about breakfast after the bell delivery models implemented at each school and make the information publicly available. Final resolutions approving a breakfast after the bell exemption must be submitted by the board of education of the district to the State Board of Education upon passage.
    (g) In fulfilling its responsibilities under this Section, the State Board of Education shall collaborate with school districts and nonprofit organizations knowledgeable about equity, the opportunity gap, hunger and food security issues, and best practices for improving student access to school breakfast. The State Board of Education shall collaborate with nonprofit organizations knowledgeable about food security issues and best practices for improving access to school breakfast to create and post a list of opportunities for philanthropic support of school breakfast programs on its website. This information must also be shared with school districts.
(Source: P.A. 99-850, eff. 1-1-17.)

105 ILCS 126/20

    (105 ILCS 126/20)
    Sec. 20. Summer food service program.
    (a) The State Board of Education shall promulgate a State plan for summer food service programs, in accordance with 42 U.S.C. Sec. 1761 and any other applicable federal laws and regulations, by February 1, 2008.
    (b) On or before February 15, 2008, and each year thereafter, a school district must promulgate a plan to have a summer breakfast or lunch (or both) food service program for each school (i) in which at least 50% of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals and (ii) that has a summer school program. The plan must be implemented during the summer of 2008 and each year thereafter as long as the school district has a school or schools that meet the above criteria. Each summer food service program must operate for the duration of the school's summer school program. If the school district has one or more elementary schools that qualify, the summer food service program must be operated in a manner that ensures all eligible students receive services. If a school in which at least 50% of the students are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals is not open during the summer months, the school shall provide information regarding the number of children in the school who are eligible for free or reduced-price school meals upon request by a not-for-profit entity.
    (c) Summer food service programs established under this Section shall be supported by federal funds and commodities and other available State and local resources.
    (d) A school district shall be allowed to opt out of the summer food service program requirement of this Section if it is determined that, due to circumstances specific to that school district, the expense reimbursement would not fully cover the costs of implementing and operating a summer food service program. The school district shall petition its regional superintendent of schools by January 15 to request to be exempt from the summer food service program requirement. The petition shall include all legitimate costs associated with implementing and operating a summer food service program, the estimated reimbursement from State and federal sources, and any unique circumstances the school district can verify that exist that would cause the implementation and operation of such a program to be cost prohibitive.
    The regional superintendent of schools shall review the petition. He or she shall convene a public hearing to hear testimony from the school district and interested community members. The regional superintendent shall, by March 1, inform the school district of his or her decision, along with the reasons why the exemption was granted or denied, in writing. If the regional superintendent grants an exemption to the school district, then the school district is relieved from the requirement to establish and implement a summer food service program.
    If the regional superintendent of schools does not grant an exemption to the school district, then the school district shall implement and operate a summer food service program in accordance with this Section the summer following the current school year. However, the school district or a resident of the school district may appeal the decision of the regional superintendent to the State Superintendent of Education. No later than April 1 of each year, the State Superintendent shall hear appeals on the decisions of regional superintendents of schools. The State Superintendent shall make a final decision at the conclusion of the hearing on the school district's request for an exemption from the summer food service program requirement. If the State Superintendent grants an exemption to the school district, then the school district is relieved from the requirement to implement and operate a summer food service program. If the State Superintendent does not grant an exemption to the school district, then the school district shall implement and operate a summer food service program in accordance with this Section the summer following the current school year.
(Source: P.A. 95-155, eff. 8-14-07; 96-734, eff. 8-25-09.)

105 ILCS 126/95

    (105 ILCS 126/95)
    Sec. 95. (Amendatory provisions; text omitted).
(Source: P.A. 93-1086, eff. 2-15-05; text omitted.)

105 ILCS 126/99

    (105 ILCS 126/99)
    Sec. 99. Effective date. This Act takes effect upon becoming law.
(Source: P.A. 93-1086, eff. 2-15-05.)