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Illinois Compiled Statutes

Information maintained by the Legislative Reference Bureau
Updating the database of the Illinois Compiled Statutes (ILCS) is an ongoing process. Recent laws may not yet be included in the ILCS database, but they are found on this site as Public Acts soon after they become law. For information concerning the relationship between statutes and Public Acts, refer to the Guide.

Because the statute database is maintained primarily for legislative drafting purposes, statutory changes are sometimes included in the statute database before they take effect. If the source note at the end of a Section of the statutes includes a Public Act that has not yet taken effect, the version of the law that is currently in effect may have already been removed from the database and you should refer to that Public Act to see the changes made to the current law.

EMPLOYMENT
(820 ILCS 105/) Minimum Wage Law.

820 ILCS 105/1

    (820 ILCS 105/1) (from Ch. 48, par. 1001)
    Sec. 1. This Act is known and may be cited as the "Minimum Wage Law".
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)

820 ILCS 105/2

    (820 ILCS 105/2) (from Ch. 48, par. 1002)
    Sec. 2. The General Assembly finds that the existence in industries, trades or business, or branches thereof, including offices, mercantile establishments and all other places of employment in the State of Illinois covered by this Act, of conditions detrimental to the maintenance of the minimum standard of living necessary for the health, efficiency and general well-being of workers, leads to labor disputes, and places burdens on the State, and all other subordinate political bodies thereof, to assist and supply necessary moneys and goods to workers and their families to aid them to exist on a minimum budget for their needs, and thus places an unnecessary burden on the taxpayers of this State. Therefore, it is the policy of this Act to establish a minimum wage standard for workers at a level consistent with their health, efficiency and general well-being; to safeguard such minimum wage against the unfair competition of wage and hour standards which do not provide such adequate standards of living; and to sustain purchasing power and increase employment opportunities.
    It is against public policy for an employer to pay to his employees an amount less than that fixed by this Act. Payment of any amount less than herein fixed is an unreasonable and oppressive wage, and less than sufficient to meet the minimum cost of living necessary for health. Any contract, agreement or understanding for or in relation to such unreasonable and oppressive wage for any employment covered by this Act is void.
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)

820 ILCS 105/2.1

    (820 ILCS 105/2.1) (from Ch. 48, par. 1002.1)
    Sec. 2.1. Participation by an employee in any kind of ridesharing arrangement shall not result in the application of this Act to the period of time necessary to effectively use such an arrangement.
(Source: P.A. 83-402.)

820 ILCS 105/3

    (820 ILCS 105/3) (from Ch. 48, par. 1003)
    Sec. 3. As used in this Act:
    (a) "Director" means the Director of the Department of Labor, and "Department" means the Department of Labor.
    (b) "Wages" means compensation due to an employee by reason of his employment, including allowances determined by the Director in accordance with the provisions of this Act for gratuities and, when furnished by the employer, for meals and lodging actually used by the employee.
    (c) "Employer" includes any individual, partnership, association, corporation, limited liability company, business trust, governmental or quasi-governmental body, or any person or group of persons acting directly or indirectly in the interest of an employer in relation to an employee, for which one or more persons are gainfully employed on some day within a calendar year. An employer is subject to this Act in a calendar year on and after the first day in such calendar year in which he employs one or more persons, and for the following calendar year.
    (d) "Employee" includes any individual permitted to work by an employer in an occupation, but does not include any individual permitted to work:
        (1) For an employer employing fewer than 4 employees
    
exclusive of the employer's parent, spouse or child or other members of his immediate family.
        (2) As an employee employed in agriculture or
    
aquaculture (A) if such employee is employed by an employer who did not, during any calendar quarter during the preceding calendar year, use more than 500 man-days of agricultural or aquacultural labor, (B) if such employee is the parent, spouse or child, or other member of the employer's immediate family, (C) if such employee (i) is employed as a hand harvest laborer and is paid on a piece rate basis in an operation which has been, and is customarily and generally recognized as having been, paid on a piece rate basis in the region of employment, (ii) commutes daily from his permanent residence to the farm on which he is so employed, and (iii) has been employed in agriculture less than 13 weeks during the preceding calendar year, (D) if such employee (other than an employee described in clause (C) of this subparagraph): (i) is 16 years of age or under and is employed as a hand harvest laborer, is paid on a piece rate basis in an operation which has been, and is customarily and generally recognized as having been, paid on a piece rate basis in the region of employment, (ii) is employed on the same farm as his parent or person standing in the place of his parent, and (iii) is paid at the same piece rate as employees over 16 are paid on the same farm.
        (3) In domestic service in or about a private home.
        (4) As an outside salesman.
        (5) As a member of a religious corporation or
    
organization.
        (6) At an accredited Illinois college or university
    
employed by the college or university at which he is a student who is covered under the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as heretofore or hereafter amended.
        (7) For a motor carrier and with respect to whom the
    
U.S. Secretary of Transportation has the power to establish qualifications and maximum hours of service under the provisions of Title 49 U.S.C. or the State of Illinois under Section 18b-105 (Title 92 of the Illinois Administrative Code, Part 395 - Hours of Service of Drivers) of the Illinois Vehicle Code.
    The above exclusions from the term "employee" may be further defined by regulations of the Director.
    (e) "Occupation" means an industry, trade, business or class of work in which employees are gainfully employed.
    (f) "Gratuities" means voluntary monetary contributions to an employee from a guest, patron or customer in connection with services rendered.
    (g) "Outside salesman" means an employee regularly engaged in making sales or obtaining orders or contracts for services where a major portion of such duties are performed away from his employer's place of business.
    (h) "Day camp" means a seasonal recreation program in operation for no more than 16 weeks intermittently throughout the calendar year, accommodating for profit or under philanthropic or charitable auspices, 5 or more children under 18 years of age, not including overnight programs. The term "day camp" does not include a "day care agency", "child care facility" or "foster family home" as licensed by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services.
(Source: P.A. 94-1025, eff. 7-14-06; 95-945, eff. 1-1-09.)

820 ILCS 105/4

    (820 ILCS 105/4) (from Ch. 48, par. 1004)
    Sec. 4. (a)(1) Every employer shall pay to each of his employees in every occupation wages of not less than $2.30 per hour or in the case of employees under 18 years of age wages of not less than $1.95 per hour, except as provided in Sections 5 and 6 of this Act, and on and after January 1, 1984, every employer shall pay to each of his employees in every occupation wages of not less than $2.65 per hour or in the case of employees under 18 years of age wages of not less than $2.25 per hour, and on and after October 1, 1984 every employer shall pay to each of his employees in every occupation wages of not less than $3.00 per hour or in the case of employees under 18 years of age wages of not less than $2.55 per hour, and on or after July 1, 1985 every employer shall pay to each of his employees in every occupation wages of not less than $3.35 per hour or in the case of employees under 18 years of age wages of not less than $2.85 per hour, and from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004 every employer shall pay to each of his or her employees who is 18 years of age or older in every occupation wages of not less than $5.50 per hour, and from January 1, 2005 through June 30, 2007 every employer shall pay to each of his or her employees who is 18 years of age or older in every occupation wages of not less than $6.50 per hour, and from July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008 every employer shall pay to each of his or her employees who is 18 years of age or older in every occupation wages of not less than $7.50 per hour, and from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009 every employer shall pay to each of his or her employees who is 18 years of age or older in every occupation wages of not less than $7.75 per hour, and from July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010 every employer shall pay to each of his or her employees who is 18 years of age or older in every occupation wages of not less than $8.00 per hour, and on and after July 1, 2010 every employer shall pay to each of his or her employees who is 18 years of age or older in every occupation wages of not less than $8.25 per hour.
    (2) Unless an employee's wages are reduced under Section 6, then in lieu of the rate prescribed in item (1) of this subsection (a), an employer may pay an employee who is 18 years of age or older, during the first 90 consecutive calendar days after the employee is initially employed by the employer, a wage that is not more than 50 less than the wage prescribed in item (1) of this subsection (a); however, an employer shall pay not less than the rate prescribed in item (1) of this subsection (a) to:
        (A) a day or temporary laborer, as defined in Section
    
5 of the Day and Temporary Labor Services Act, who is 18 years of age or older; and
        (B) an employee who is 18 years of age or older and
    
whose employment is occasional or irregular and requires not more than 90 days to complete.
    (3) At no time shall the wages paid to any employee under 18 years of age be more than 50 less than the wage required to be paid to employees who are at least 18 years of age under item (1) of this subsection (a).
    (b) No employer shall discriminate between employees on the basis of sex or mental or physical handicap, except as otherwise provided in this Act by paying wages to employees at a rate less than the rate at which he pays wages to employees for the same or substantially similar work on jobs the performance of which requires equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions, except where such payment is made pursuant to (1) a seniority system; (2) a merit system; (3) a system which measures earnings by quantity or quality of production; or (4) a differential based on any other factor other than sex or mental or physical handicap, except as otherwise provided in this Act.
    (c) Every employer of an employee engaged in an occupation in which gratuities have customarily and usually constituted and have been recognized as part of the remuneration for hire purposes is entitled to an allowance for gratuities as part of the hourly wage rate provided in Section 4, subsection (a) in an amount not to exceed 40% of the applicable minimum wage rate. The Director shall require each employer desiring an allowance for gratuities to provide substantial evidence that the amount claimed, which may not exceed 40% of the applicable minimum wage rate, was received by the employee in the period for which the claim of exemption is made, and no part thereof was returned to the employer.
    (d) No camp counselor who resides on the premises of a seasonal camp of an organized not-for-profit corporation shall be subject to the adult minimum wage if the camp counselor (1) works 40 or more hours per week, and (2) receives a total weekly salary of not less than the adult minimum wage for a 40-hour week. If the counselor works less than 40 hours per week, the counselor shall be paid the minimum hourly wage for each hour worked. Every employer of a camp counselor under this subsection is entitled to an allowance for meals and lodging as part of the hourly wage rate provided in Section 4, subsection (a), in an amount not to exceed 25% of the minimum wage rate.
    (e) A camp counselor employed at a day camp is not subject to the adult minimum wage if the camp counselor is paid a stipend on a onetime or periodic basis and, if the camp counselor is a minor, the minor's parent, guardian or other custodian has consented in writing to the terms of payment before the commencement of such employment.
(Source: P.A. 94-1072, eff. 7-1-07; 94-1102, eff. 7-1-07; 95-945, eff. 1-1-09.)

820 ILCS 105/4a

    (820 ILCS 105/4a) (from Ch. 48, par. 1004a)
    Sec. 4a. (1) Except as otherwise provided in this Section, no employer shall employ any of his employees for a workweek of more than 40 hours unless such employee receives compensation for his employment in excess of the hours above specified at a rate not less than 1 1/2 times the regular rate at which he is employed.
    (2) The provisions of subsection (1) of this Section are not applicable to:
        A. Any salesman or mechanic primarily engaged in
    
selling or servicing automobiles, trucks or farm implements, if he is employed by a nonmanufacturing establishment primarily engaged in the business of selling such vehicles or implements to ultimate purchasers.
        B. Any salesman primarily engaged in selling
    
trailers, boats, or aircraft, if he is employed by a nonmanufacturing establishment primarily engaged in the business of selling trailers, boats, or aircraft to ultimate purchasers.
        C. Any employer of agricultural labor, with respect
    
to such agricultural employment.
        D. Any employee of a governmental body excluded from
    
the definition of "employee" under paragraph (e)(2)(C) of Section 3 of the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.
        E. Any employee employed in a bona fide executive,
    
administrative or professional capacity, including any radio or television announcer, news editor, or chief engineer, as defined by or covered by the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and the rules adopted under that Act, as both exist on March 30, 2003, but compensated at the amount of salary specified in subsections (a) and (b) of Section 541.600 of Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations as proposed in the Federal Register on March 31, 2003 or a greater amount of salary as may be adopted by the United States Department of Labor. For bona fide executive, administrative, and professional employees of not-for-profit corporations, the Director may, by regulation, adopt a weekly wage rate standard lower than that provided for executive, administrative, and professional employees covered under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as now or hereafter amended.
        F. Any commissioned employee as described in
    
paragraph (i) of Section 7 of the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, as now or hereafter amended.
        G. Any employment of an employee in the stead of
    
another employee of the same employer pursuant to a worktime exchange agreement between employees.
        H. Any employee of a not-for-profit educational or
    
residential child care institution who (a) on a daily basis is directly involved in educating or caring for children who (1) are orphans, foster children, abused, neglected or abandoned children, or are otherwise homeless children and (2) reside in residential facilities of the institution and (b) is compensated at an annual rate of not less than $13,000 or, if the employee resides in such facilities and receives without cost board and lodging from such institution, not less than $10,000.
        I. Any employee employed as a crew member of any
    
uninspected towing vessel, as defined by Section 2101(40) of Title 46 of the United States Code, operating in any navigable waters in or along the boundaries of the State of Illinois.
    (3) Any employer may employ any employee for a period or periods of not more than 10 hours in the aggregate in any workweek in excess of the maximum hours specified in subsection (1) of this Section without paying the compensation for overtime employment prescribed in subsection (1) if during that period or periods the employee is receiving remedial education that:
        (a) is provided to employees who lack a high school
    
diploma or educational attainment at the eighth grade level;
        (b) is designed to provide reading and other basic
    
skills at an eighth grade level or below; and
        (c) does not include job specific training.
    (4) A governmental body is not in violation of subsection (1) if the governmental body provides compensatory time pursuant to paragraph (o) of Section 7 of the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as now or hereafter amended, or is engaged in fire protection or law enforcement activities and meets the requirements of paragraph (k) of Section 7 or paragraph (b)(20) of Section 13 of the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as now or hereafter amended.
(Source: P.A. 92-623, eff. 7-11-02; 93-672, eff. 4-2-04.)

820 ILCS 105/5

    (820 ILCS 105/5) (from Ch. 48, par. 1005)
    Sec. 5. The Director may provide by regulation for the employment in any occupation of individuals whose earning capacity is impaired by age, or physical or mental deficiency or injury at such wages lower than the minimum wage rate provided in Section 4, subsection (a), as he may find appropriate to prevent curtailment of opportunities for employment, to avoid undue hardship, and to safeguard the minimum wage rate of this Act, except that no person who maintains a production level within the limits required of other employees may be paid at less than the minimum wage. No employee shall be employed at wages fixed pursuant to this Section except under a special license issued under applicable regulations of the Director.
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)

820 ILCS 105/6

    (820 ILCS 105/6) (from Ch. 48, par. 1006)
    Sec. 6. (a) For any occupation, the Director may provide by regulation for the employment in that occupation of learners at such wages lower than the minimum wage provided in items (1) and (3) of subsection (a) of Section 4 as the Director may find appropriate to prevent curtailment of opportunities for employment and to safeguard the minimum wage rate of this Act.
    (b) Where the Director has provided by regulation for the employment of learners, such regulations are subject to provisions hereinafter set forth and to such additional terms and conditions as may be established in supplemental regulations applicable to the employment of learners in particular industries.
    (c) In any occupation, every employer may pay a subminimum wage to learners during their period of learning. However, under no circumstances, may an employer pay a learner a wage less than 70% of the minimum wage rate provided in item (1) of subsection (a) of Section 4 of this Act for employees 18 years of age or older.
    (d) No person is deemed a learner in any occupation for which he has completed the required training; and in no case may a person be deemed a learner in that occupation after 6 months of such training, except where the Director finds, after investigation, that for the particular occupation a minimum of proficiency cannot be acquired in 6 months.
(Source: P.A. 94-1072, eff. 7-1-07.)

820 ILCS 105/7

    (820 ILCS 105/7) (from Ch. 48, par. 1007)
    Sec. 7. The Director or his authorized representatives have the authority to:
    (a) Investigate and gather data regarding the wages, hours and other conditions and practices of employment in any industry subject to this Act, and may enter and inspect such places and such records (and make such transcriptions thereof) at reasonable times during regular business hours, not including lunch time at a restaurant, question such employees, and investigate such facts, conditions, practices or matters as he may deem necessary or appropriate to determine whether any person has violated any provision of this Act, or which may aid in the enforcement of this Act.
    (b) Require from any employer full and correct statements and reports in writing, including sworn statements, at such times as the Director may deem necessary, of the wages, hours, names, addresses, and other information pertaining to his employees as he may deem necessary for the enforcement of this Act.
    (c) Require by subpoena the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of all books, records, and other evidence relative to a matter under investigation or hearing. The subpoena shall be signed and issued by the Director or his or her authorized representative. If a person fails to comply with any subpoena lawfully issued under this Section or a witness refuses to produce evidence or testify to any matter regarding which he or she may be lawfully interrogated, the court may, upon application of the Director or his or her authorized representative, compel obedience by proceedings for contempt.
(Source: P.A. 94-1025, eff. 7-14-06.)

820 ILCS 105/8

    (820 ILCS 105/8) (from Ch. 48, par. 1008)
    Sec. 8. Every employer subject to any provision of this Act or of any order issued under this Act shall make and keep for a period of not less than 3 years, true and accurate records of the name, address and occupation of each of his employees, the rate of pay, and the amount paid each pay period to each employee, the hours worked each day in each work week by each employee, and such other information and make such reports therefrom to the Director as the Director may by regulation prescribe as necessary or appropriate for the enforcement of the provisions of this Act or of the regulations thereunder. Such records shall be open for inspection or transcription by the Director or his authorized representative at any reasonable time as limited by paragraph (a) of Section 7 of this Act. Every employer shall furnish to the Director or his authorized representative on demand a sworn statement of such records and information upon forms prescribed or approved by the Director. Each worker employed at the learner rate must be designated as such on the payroll record kept by the employer, with the learner's occupation shown.
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)

820 ILCS 105/9

    (820 ILCS 105/9) (from Ch. 48, par. 1009)
    Sec. 9. Every employer subject to any provision of this Act or of any regulations issued under this Act shall keep a summary of this Act approved by the Director, and copies of any applicable regulations issued under this Act or a summary of such regulations, posted in a conspicuous and accessible place in or about the premises wherever any person subject to this Act is employed. Employers shall be furnished copies of such summaries and regulations by the State on request without charge.
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)

820 ILCS 105/10

    (820 ILCS 105/10) (from Ch. 48, par. 1010)
    Sec. 10. (a) The Director shall make and revise administrative regulations, including definitions of terms, as he deems appropriate to carry out the purposes of this Act, to prevent the circumvention or evasion thereof, and to safeguard the minimum wage established by the Act. Regulations governing employment of learners may be issued only after notice and opportunity for public hearing, as provided in subsection (c) of this Section.
    (b) In order to prevent curtailment of opportunities for employment, avoid undue hardship, and safeguard the minimum wage rate under this Act, the Director may also issue regulations providing for the employment of handicapped workers at wages lower than the wage rate applicable under this Act, under permits and for such periods of time as specified therein; and providing for the employment of learners at wages lower than the wage rate applicable under this Act. However, such regulation shall not permit lower wages for the handicapped on any basis that is unrelated to such person's ability resulting from his handicap, and such regulation may be issued only after notice and opportunity for public hearing as provided in subsection (c) of this Section.
    (c) Prior to the adoption, amendment or repeal of any rule or regulation by the Director under this Act, except regulations which concern only the internal management of the Department of Labor and do not affect any public right provided by this Act, the Director shall give proper notice to persons in any industry or occupation that may be affected by the proposed rule or regulation, and hold a public hearing on his proposed action at which any such affected person, or his duly authorized representative, may attend and testify or present other evidence for or against such proposed rule or regulation. Rules and regulations adopted under this Section shall be filed with the Secretary of State in compliance with "An Act concerning administrative rules", as now or hereafter amended. Such adopted and filed rules and regulations shall become effective 10 days after copies thereof have been mailed by the Department to persons in industries affected thereby at their last known address.
    (d) The commencement of proceedings by any person aggrieved by an administrative regulation issued under this Act does not, unless specifically ordered by the Court, operate as a stay of that administrative regulation against other persons. The Court shall not grant any stay of an administrative regulation unless the person complaining of such regulation files in the Court an undertaking with a surety or sureties satisfactory to the Court for the payment to the employees affected by the regulation, in the event such regulation is affirmed, of the amount by which the compensation such employees are entitled to receive under the regulation exceeds the compensation they actually receive while such stay is in effect.
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)

820 ILCS 105/11

    (820 ILCS 105/11) (from Ch. 48, par. 1011)
    Sec. 11. (a) Any employer or his agent, or the officer or agent of any private employer who:
    (1) Hinders or delays the Director or his authorized representative in the performance of his duties in the enforcement of this Act; or
    (2) Refuses to admit the Director or his authorized representative to any place of employment; or
    (3) Fails to keep the records required under this Act or to furnish such records required or any information to be furnished under this Act to the Director or his authorized representative upon request; or
    (4) Fails to make and preserve any records as required hereunder; or
    (5) Falsifies any such record; or
    (6) Refuses to make such records available to the Director or his authorized representative; or
    (7) Refuses to furnish a sworn statement of such records or any other information required for the proper enforcement of this Act; or
    (8) Fails to post a summary of this Act or a copy of any applicable regulation as required by Section 9 of this Act; shall be guilty of a Class B misdemeanor; and each day of such failure to keep the records required under this Act or to furnish such records or information to the Director or his authorized representative or to fail to post information as required herein constitutes a separate offense.
    (b) Any employer or his agent, or the officer or agent of any private employer, who pays or agrees to pay to any employee wages at a rate less than the rate applicable under this Act or of any regulation issued under this Act is guilty of a Class B misdemeanor, and each week on any day of which such employee is paid less than the wage rate applicable under this Act constitutes a separate offense.
    (c) Any employer or his agent, or the officer or agent of any private employer, who discharges or in any other manner discriminates against any employee because that employee has made a complaint to his employer, or to the Director or his authorized representative, that he has not been paid wages in accordance with the provisions of this Act, or because that employee has caused to be instituted or is about to cause to be instituted any proceeding under or related to this Act, or because that employee has testified or is about to testify in an investigation or proceeding under this Act, is guilty of a Class B misdemeanor.
    (d) It is the duty of the Department of Labor to inquire diligently for any violations of this Act, and to institute the action for penalties herein provided, and to enforce generally the provisions of this Act.
(Source: P.A. 86-799.)

820 ILCS 105/12

    (820 ILCS 105/12) (from Ch. 48, par. 1012)
    Sec. 12. (a) If any employee is paid by his employer less than the wage to which he is entitled under the provisions of this Act, the employee may recover in a civil action the amount of any such underpayments together with costs and such reasonable attorney's fees as may be allowed by the Court, and damages of 2% of the amount of any such underpayments for each month following the date of payment during which such underpayments remain unpaid. Any agreement between the employee and the employer to work for less than such wage is no defense to such action. At the request of the employee or on motion of the Director of Labor, the Department of Labor may make an assignment of such wage claim in trust for the assigning employee and may bring any legal action necessary to collect such claim, and the employer shall be required to pay the costs incurred in collecting such claim. Every such action shall be brought within 3 years from the date of the underpayment. Such employer shall be liable to the Department of Labor for up to 20% of the total employer's underpayment where the employer's conduct is proven by a preponderance of the evidence to be willful, repeated, or with reckless disregard of this Act or any rule adopted under this Act. Such employer shall be additionally liable to the employee for damages in the amount of 2% of the amount of any such underpayments for each month following the date of payment during which such underpayments remain unpaid. These penalties and damages may be recovered in a civil action brought by the Director of Labor in any circuit court. In any such action, the Director of Labor shall be represented by the Attorney General.
    If an employee collects damages of 2% of the amount of underpayments as a result of an action brought by the Director of Labor, the employee may not also collect those damages in a private action brought by the employee for the same violation. If an employee collects damages of 2% of the amount of underpayments in a private action brought by the employee, the employee may not also collect those damages as a result of an action brought by the Director of Labor for the same violation.
    (b) If an employee has not collected damages under subsection (a) for the same violation, the Director is authorized to supervise the payment of the unpaid minimum wages and the unpaid overtime compensation owing to any employee or employees under Sections 4 and 4a of this Act and may bring any legal action necessary to recover the amount of the unpaid minimum wages and unpaid overtime compensation and an equal additional amount as damages, and the employer shall be required to pay the costs incurred in collecting such claim. Such employer shall be additionally liable to the Department of Labor for up to 20% of the total employer's underpayment where the employer's conduct is proven by a preponderance of the evidence to be willful, repeated, or with reckless disregard of this Act or any rule adopted under this Act. The action shall be brought within 5 years from the date of the failure to pay the wages or compensation. Any sums thus recovered by the Director on behalf of an employee pursuant to this subsection shall be paid to the employee or employees affected. Any sums which, more than one year after being thus recovered, the Director is unable to pay to an employee shall be deposited into the General Revenue Fund.
(Source: P.A. 94-1025, eff. 7-14-06.)

820 ILCS 105/13

    (820 ILCS 105/13) (from Ch. 48, par. 1013)
    Sec. 13. Any standards relating to minimum wages, maximum hours, overtime compensation or other working conditions in effect under any other law of this State on the effective date of this Act which are more favorable to employees than those applicable to such employees under this Act or the regulations issued hereunder, are not amended, rescinded, or otherwise affected by this Act but continue in full force and effect and may be enforced as provided by law unless and until they are specifically superseded by standards more favorable to such employees by operation of or in accordance with regulations issued under this Act.
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)

820 ILCS 105/14

    (820 ILCS 105/14) (from Ch. 48, par. 1014)
    Sec. 14. Nothing in this Act is deemed to interfere with, impede, or in any way diminish the right of employees to bargain collectively with their employers through representatives of their own choosing in order to establish wages or other conditions of work in excess of the applicable minimum standards of the provisions of this Act.
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)

820 ILCS 105/15

    (820 ILCS 105/15) (from Ch. 48, par. 1015)
    Sec. 15. If any provision of this Act or the application thereof to any person, employer, occupation or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of this Act and the application of such provision to other persons, employers, occupations, or circumstances are not affected thereby.
(Source: P.A. 77-1451.)