TITLE 77: PUBLIC HEALTH
CHAPTER I: DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SUBCHAPTER g: GRANTS TO DENTAL AND MEDICAL STUDENTS
PART 590 FAMILY PRACTICE RESIDENCY CODE
SECTION 590.410 CRITERIA FOR DESIGNATING SHORTAGE AREAS


 

Section 590.410  Criteria for Designating Shortage Areas

 

a)         Shortage areas may include the following:

 

1)         An urban or rural area which is a rational area for the delivery of health services;

 

2)         A population group; or

 

3)         A public or nonprofit private medical facility. (Section 3.04 of the Act)

 

b)         Areas and population groups designated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (see 42 CFR 5) as having shortages of primary care physicians shall qualify for purposes described in this Part.

 

c)         Additional areas shall be designated using the following criteria:

 

1)         Urban service areas with a population-to-primary care physician ratio of at least 3000:1;

 

2)         Rural service areas with a population-to-primary care physician ratio of at least 2400:1;

 

3)         Rural service areas with a population-to-primary care physician ratio between 1800:1 and 2399:1, and where one-third of the primary care physicians in the area are 60 years of age or older;

 

4)         Urban or rural areas where board certified pediatricians or obstetrician/gynecologists are not practicing within the service area, and where there is sufficient need to support a full-time practice.  Sufficient need, for the purposes of this subsection (c)(4), may be documented in the following manner:

 

A)        At least 80% of the non-pediatric or obstetric physicians within the service area agree that there is a sufficient need.

 

B)        At least 80% of the pediatric or obstetric physicians within the service area agree that there is sufficient need.

 

C)        Hospital administrators and local health department administrators within the service area agree that there is sufficient need.

 

5)         Rural service areas where the obstetricians having admitting privileges at a hospital with an obstetrical unit perform more deliveries per year than the statewide average.  The statewide average is obtained by dividing the number of obstetricians providing patient care in Illinois in a particular year into the number of births in Illinois in the same year; and when the existing obstetricians and family practice physicians within the service area providing obstetrical care express, in writing, their need for additional obstetricians.

 

d)         Facilities whose mission is to provide care to underserved populations will be designated for purposes of this Part. These facilities include:

 

1)         Local health departments that establish primary care clinics, offering direct patient care on either a full or part-time basis;

 

2)         Any community health center or its satellite in Illinois that is funded through Section 330 of the Public Health Service Act or is designated a Federally Qualified Health Center Look-Alike;

 

3)         Health clinics that can document that at least 51 percent of their patients are a combination of the following:

 

A)        Medicaid eligible; or

 

B)        Qualify for reduced fees based on a sliding fee scale using as an upper limit 200 percent of the federal poverty level, as published annually in the Federal Register.

 

(Source:  Amended at 35 Ill. Reg. 14089, effective August 4, 2011)