TITLE 23: EDUCATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES
SUBTITLE A: EDUCATION
CHAPTER I: STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
SUBCHAPTER b: PERSONNEL
PART 28 STANDARDS FOR ENDORSEMENTS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
SECTION 28.200 STANDARDS FOR THE LEARNING BEHAVIOR SPECIALIST I (LBS I)


 

Section 28.200 Standards for the Learning Behavior Specialist I (LBS I)

 

The Learning Behavior Specialist I is a teacher of children and youth with one or more of the following documented disabilities as specified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 USC 1400 et seq.): specific learning disabilities, emotional disturbance, mental retardation, autism, traumatic brain injury, orthopedic or other health impairment. Beginning July 31, 2002, a teacher preparation program or course of study leading to the issuance of the special K-age 21 Learning Behavior Specialist I (LBS I) endorsement on a professional educator license shall be approved only if it includes content that will enable candidates to meet the standards set forth in this Section. Beginning January 1, 2003, the examination required for issuance of this credential shall be based upon these standards.

 

a) Foundations The competent learning behavior specialist understands the philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of special education; he or she meets the standards set forth in Section 28.100(a) of this Part.

 

b) Characteristics of Learners The competent learning behavior specialist understands the impact that disabilities have on the cognitive, physical, emotional, social, and communication development of an individual and provides opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students (ages 3-21).

 

1) Knowledge The competent learning behavior specialist understands:

 

A) the impact of language disorders, processing deficits, cognitive disorders, behavioral/emotional/social disorders, and physical (including sensory) disabilities on learning;

 

B) the impact of language disorders, processing deficits, cognitive disorders, behavioral/emotional/social disorders, and physical (including sensory) disabilities on behavior; and

 

C) the unique impact of multiple disabilities on learning and behavior.

 

2) Performance The competent learning behavior specialist provides information about students with language disorders, processing deficits, cognitive disorders, behavioral/emotional/social disorders, physical disabilities, and health impairments and their impact on learning to teachers, parents and employers as appropriate.

 

c) Assessment The competent learning behavior specialist understands the educational assessment process and uses various assessment strategies to support the continuous development of all students (ages 3-21).

 

1) Knowledge the competent learning behavior specialist understands:

 

A) strategies for assessing individual learning characteristics and modes of communication;

 

B) strategies for assessing students' skills within curricular areas, including academic, social and vocational;

 

C) strategies for assessing learning environments and conducting functional behavioral assessments within the environment;

 

D) a model of reading diagnosis that includes student proficiency with print conventions, phonemic awareness, word recognition, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, and self-monitoring; and

 

E) the uses and limitations of informal and formal assessments.

 

2) Performance The competent learning behavior specialist:

 

A) adapts group academic and statewide assessments for students with disabilities;

 

B) assesses the extent and quality of an individual's access to the general curriculum;

 

C) monitors a student's progress through the general curriculum;

 

D) designs and implements functional assessment procedures;

 

E) assesses reliable methods of response in individuals who lack typical communication and performance abilities;

 

F) adapts formal assessment devices to accommodate a student's mode of communication and response;

 

G) identifies students' educational priorities by developing and conducting an individualized inventory of the student's home, community, social, and vocational environments and integrated curriculum needs;

 

H) identifies a hierarchy of reinforcers and empirically evaluates their effectiveness for an individual with moderate, severe, and multiple disabilities;

 

I) determines strengths and needs of individual students in the area of reading;

 

J) determines students' independent, instructional, and frustrational reading levels to inform instruction; and

 

K) interprets and explains reading diagnostic information for classroom teachers, parents, and other specialists to plan instructional programs.

 

d) Planning for Instruction The competent learning behavior specialist understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. The learning behavior specialist understands instructional planning and designs instruction based on knowledge of the discipline, student, community, and curriculum goals.

 

1) Knowledge The competent learning behavior specialist understands:

 

A) the Illinois Learning Standards (see 23 Ill. Adm. Code 1.Appendix D) and effective instructional strategies and resources for teaching the scope and sequence in the academic, social, and vocational curricular domains;

 

B) effective instructional strategies for adapting the general curriculum to meet the needs of individual students;

 

C) the use of appropriate reading intervention strategies and support systems for meeting the needs of diverse learners;

 

D) the differences between reading skills and strategies, and the role each plays in reading development;

 

E) importance and strategies for teaching emerging literacy skills (concept of print, phonemic awareness, fluency, and comprehension) to success in reading achievement;

 

F) the strategies to develop a longitudinal, outcome-based curriculum with the identification of priorities, including social, language, academic and career and technical skills across life skill domains (i.e., domestic, recreation/leisure, vocational, and community);

 

G) adaptive equipment to facilitate eating, dressing, grooming, bowel and bladder management, independent living, and mobility;

 

H) guidelines for the selection and use of augmentative or assistive technology devices (e.g., sign language, electronic devices, picture and symbol systems, and language boards);

 

I) effective strategies for teaching study skills;

 

J) the skills necessary for student success in community settings;

 

K) community career and technical options, including supported employment and competitive employment models;

 

L) the rationale for career development and vocational programming across the preschool to postsecondary age span; and

M) the principles of partial participation.

 

2) Performance The competent learning behavior specialist:

 

A) integrates knowledge of the characteristics of the learner, Illinois Learning Standards, general curriculum and adaptation strategies appropriately into an effective individualized education program;

 

B) selects appropriate instructional strategies based on the curricular content and the age and skill level of the student;

C) evaluates, selects, develops, and adapts curricular materials and technology appropriate for individuals with disabilities;

 

D) applies the use of appropriate reading intervention strategies and support systems for meeting the needs of diverse learners;

 

E) adjusts reading instruction to meet the learning needs of diverse learners;

 

F) assesses the entrance level skill requirements of a potential site for vocational placement;

 

G) prioritizes skills and chooses chronologically age-appropriate materials, emphasizing functionality, instruction in natural settings, and interactions between students with and without disabilities;

 

H) develops longitudinal, outcome-based curricula for individual students;

 

I) identifies and prioritizes objectives for community skill training;

 

J) identifies available community recreational/leisure activities; and

 

K) identifies career and technical and community placements appropriate to the age and skill level of the student.

 

e) Learning Environment The competent learning behavior specialist uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

 

1) Knowledge The competent learning behavior specialist understands:

 

A) rationale for selecting specific management techniques; and

 

B) theories and positive approaches for managing significant behavior problems, including self-stimulation and self-abuse.

 

2) Performance The competent learning behavior specialist:

 

A) uses appropriate strategies for managing significant behavioral episodes and crisis intervention;

 

B) coordinates activities of related services personnel to maximize direct instruction time for individuals with disabilities and to ensure that related services are integrated into individuals' daily activities and schedule;

 

C) uses appropriate strategies for decreasing self-abusive behaviors; and

 

D) plans and implements instructional programs and behavioral interventions designed to facilitate the acquisition of adaptive social skills.

 

f) Instructional Delivery The competent learning behavior specialist understands the central concepts and methods of inquiry; uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem-solving, and performance skills; and creates learning experiences that make content meaningful to all students (ages 3-21).

 

1) Knowledge The competent learning behavior specialist understands:

 

A) effective instructional strategies for basic sequences of skills in the academic, social, and career and technical curricular areas;

 

B) traditional, improved traditional, and rapid procedures for helping individuals achieve bowel and bladder control;

 

C) language intervention strategies and appropriate uses across age and skill levels;

 

D) instructional procedures for increasing communication use, spontaneity, and to promote generalization of communication; and

 

E) instructional procedures for facilitating errorless learning, including teacher delivered prompts and discrimination learning.

 

2) Performance The competent learning behavior specialist:

 

A) plans, organizes, and implements educational programs appropriate to the cognitive, linguistic, and physical needs of individuals in the least restrictive environment;

 

B) integrates academic instruction, affective education, and behavior management for individual learners and groups of learners in the least restrictive environment;

 

C) uses strategies to enhance the thinking process;

 

D) uses effective instructional strategies to assist individuals with disabilities to develop and self-monitor academic and social skills;

 

E) provides community-referenced instruction;

 

F) interprets sensory, mobility, reflex, and perceptual information to create appropriate lessons;

 

G) integrates study skills curriculum with delivery of academic instruction;

 

H) participates in the selection and implementation of augmentative or alternative communication devices and systems for use with students with disabilities;

 

I) matches individual needs with appropriate community placements, including supported employment and competitive employment models;

 

J) applies principles of instruction for generalized language arts or math skills to teaching domestic, community, school, recreational, or vocational skills that require language arts or math;

 

K) designs and implements instructional programs for teaching eating, dressing, grooming, and toileting skills;

 

L) uses language intervention strategies and appropriate usage across age and skill levels;

 

M) uses instructional procedures for facilitating errorless learning, including teacher delivered prompts and discrimination learning;

 

N) plans and implements individualized systematic instructional programs to teach priority skills;

 

O) uses instructional procedures for increasing communication use and spontaneity, and to promote generalization of communication;

 

P) plans and implements instructional programs directed toward objectives established for recreation/leisure skills, domestic skills, community skills, and career development and vocational training emphasizing positive self-concepts and realistic goals; and

 

Q) plans and implements programs for students transitioning from school to adult life.

 

g) Collaborative Relationships The competent learning behavior specialist uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction among professionals, parents, paraprofessional educators, and students.

 

1) Knowledge The competent learning behavior specialist understands collaborative and consultative roles of special educators in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum, and educational and alternative settings (including community).

 

2) Performance The competent learning behavior specialist collaborates with parents, general educators, other professionals (including community) and paraprofessional educators in the integration of individuals with disabilities into the general curriculum, and educational and alternative settings.

 

h) Professional Conduct and Leadership The competent learning behavior specialist understands teaching as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve students' learning and well-being.

 

1) Knowledge The competent learning behavior specialist understands the scope of his or her practice and seeks additional resources and assistance as needed to meet the individualized needs of students.

 

2) Performance The competent learning behavior specialist:

 

A) practices within his or her own scope of practice and seeks additional resources and assistance as needed to meet the individualized needs of students;

 

B) demonstrates an ethical responsibility to advocate for the least restrictive environment and appropriate services; and

 

C) engages in professional activities that benefit students with disabilities.

 

i) Reflection and Professional Growth The competent learning behavior specialist is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally. The competent learning behavior specialist:

 

1) conducts self-evaluation, making ongoing adjustments to assessment and intervention techniques as needed to improve services to students; and

 

2) reflects on one's own practice to improve instruction and guide professional growth.

 

(Source: Amended at 38 Ill. Reg. 6313, effective February 27, 2014)