TITLE 23: EDUCATION AND CULTURAL RESOURCES
SUBTITLE A: EDUCATION
CHAPTER I: STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
SUBCHAPTER b: PERSONNEL
PART 25 EDUCATOR LICENSURE
SECTION 25.APPENDIX D CRITERIA FOR IDENTIFICATION OF TEACHERS AS "HIGHLY QUALIFIED" IN VARIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES



Section 25.APPENDIX D   Criteria for Identification of Teachers as "Highly Qualified" in Various Circumstances

 

Introduction and General Principles

 

Pursuant to the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (ESEA) (20 USC 6301 et seq.), teachers with primary responsibility for instructing students in the core academic subject areas (science, the arts, reading or language arts, English, history, civics and government, economics, geography, foreign language, and mathematics) are required to be "highly qualified" for those assignments.  The criteria set forth in this Appendix D are those that will be used in Illinois to make this determination.

A teacher's qualifications do not make him or her "highly qualified" in the absolute sense.  Rather, the question is whether a teacher is "highly qualified" with respect to his or her areas of assignment.  A teacher who collaborates or consults with another teacher does not have "primary responsibility" and is not required to be "highly qualified" in the core academic subject area; each teacher who does have "primary responsibility" for a core academic subject area must be.

 

There are differences between the criteria for being considered "highly qualified" and some of the Illinois requirements for various assignments (see Subpart G of 23 Ill. Adm. Code 1, Public Schools Evaluation, Recognition and Supervision).  The "highly qualified" status of a given individual with respect to an assignment shall not relieve any entity that is required to employ licensed staff of the obligation to observe the applicable Illinois requirements for that assignment.

 

In establishing requirements for being considered "highly qualified", ESEA and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (also referred to as "IDEA 2004") (20 USC 1400, as amended by P.L. 108-446) distinguish between "veteran teachers" and those who are new to the profession.  In addition to the specific requirements set forth for being considered "highly qualified" for particular assignments, veteran teachers can be considered "highly qualified" based on an additional set of criteria, the High Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE).  For the purposes of this Appendix D, each individual shall become a "veteran teacher" when he or she has accrued at least one full year's teaching experience.  The HOUSSE criteria may then be applied in determining whether the individual can be considered "highly qualified" for assignments in core subjects.

 

A degree of flexibility has been afforded for teachers in programs supported by Title I funds who are employed in "rural" schools, which are defined as schools in districts that are eligible to participate in the Small Rural School Achievement (SRSA) program (for a list, see the website of the U.S. Department of Education at www.ed.gov/programs/reapsrsa/eligible04/index.html).  A district may take advantage of this flexibility if it provides high-quality professional development that increases the teachers' content knowledge in the additional subjects they teach and provides mentoring or a program of intensive supervision that consists of structured guidance and regular, ongoing support so that teachers become highly qualified in the additional core academic subjects they teach.

 

A teacher in this situation who was first employed on or before August 1, 2005, who teaches multiple core academic subjects, and who is "highly qualified" in one of those subjects will be considered "highly qualified" in the other subjects taught through the end of the 2006-07 school year, after which time he or she will be subject to the requirements for the additional core academic subjects taught and may use the HOUSSE criteria as applicable.

 

A teacher in this situation who was first employed after August 1, 2005, who teaches multiple core academic subjects, and who is "highly qualified" in one of those subjects will be considered "highly qualified" in the other subjects taught for a period of three years after the date of first employment, after which time he or she will be subject to the requirements for the additional core academic subjects taught and may use the HOUSSE criteria as applicable.

 

In the material that follows, the term "primary grades" or "primary level" refers to kindergarten and grades 1 through 5.  The "middle grades" are grades 6 through 8.  The "secondary level" consists of grades 9 through 12.

 

Further, references to a particular type of license and the endorsements on that license (e.g., professional educator license endorsed for elementary self-contained general education) should be understood to mean a license that is also valid for the subjects taught by virtue of the licensee's subject-specific qualifications.  These references include professional educator licenses and educator licenses with stipulations when applicable.  However, a professional educator license with a National Board of Professional Teaching Standards designation that is endorsed for the subject area of assignment is, in and of itself, a basis for the holder's being considered "highly qualified" for that assignment, other than at the primary level, where passage of a test is required of teachers who are new to the profession.  That is (except in the case of assignments at the elementary level), an individual who holds a relevant professional educator license shall be considered "highly qualified" without reference to any additional requirements stated for the assignment to which the professional educator license with a National Board of Professional Teaching Standards designation applies.

 

A professional educator license endorsed for "elementary" grade levels is the previously issued "Type 03" certificate established under Section 21-3 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21-3].  A professional educator license endorsed for "early childhood"  is the previously issued "Type 04" certificate established under Section 21-2.1 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21-2.1].  A professional educator license endorsed for "secondary" grade levels is the previously issued "Type 09" certificate established under Section 21-5 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21-5].  Either a "special K-12" (subject-specific) endorsement or a "special preschool-age 21" endorsement is a "Type 10" certificate established under Section 21-4 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21-4].  An educator license with stipulations endorsed for "transitional bilingual educator" is the previously issued "Type 29" certificate established under Section 14C-8 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/14C-8].  A "short-term emergency" approval in special education on a professional educator license is a "Type 12" certificate established under Section 25.48 of this Part.

 

General Education

 

Kindergarten and Grades 1-5

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she:

 

a)         holds a professional educator license endorsed for either the elementary grades or special K-12 with an endorsement for self-contained general elementary education and has passed the Elementary/Middle Grades test, Elementary Education test or Middle Grades test, as applicable to the endorsement held; or

 

b)         holds a professional educator license endorsed for either the elementary grades or special K-12 valid for the subjects taught and has passed the content-area test applicable to that endorsement; or

 

c)         holds a professional educator license endorsed for early childhood that is valid for the primary grades and has passed the Early Childhood test (applicable only through grade 3); or

 

d)         holds a professional educator license endorsed for the elementary grades, early childhood, or special K-12 valid for the subjects taught and qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable.

 

Middle Grades (6-8)

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects, whether in a self-contained or a departmentalized setting, will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she holds a professional educator license endorsed for the elementary grades, special K-12, or secondary grades valid for the subjects taught and:

 

a)         has passed the Elementary/Middle Grades test, Elementary Education test or Middle Grades test, as applicable to the endorsement held; or

 

b)         for each core subject area of teaching responsibility:

 

1)         has passed the content-area test specific to the subject taught, or

 

2)         has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major, or

 

3)         holds a master's or higher degree in a field directly related to the area of assignment, or

 

4)         holds an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license, or

 

5)         qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable.

 

Secondary Grades (9-12)

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she holds a professional educator license endorsed for the secondary grades or special K-12 or, for grade 9 only, endorsed for the elementary grades valid for the subjects taught and for each core subject area of teaching responsibility:

 

a)         has passed the relevant content-area test; or

 

b)         has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major; or

 

c)         holds a master's or higher degree in a field directly related to the area of assignment; or

 

d)         holds NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license; or

 

e)         qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable.

 

Bilingual Education

 

Requirements specific to English as a Second Language (ESL) (or English as a New Language (ENL)) are stated separately (see below).

 

Kindergarten and Grades 1-5

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects, other than ESL or ENL, in a program of bilingual education will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she:

 

a)         holds an endorsement for bilingual education on a professional educator license or an educator license with stipulations endorsed for transitional bilingual educator and:

 

1)         holds an elementary or a special K-12 endorsement for self-contained general elementary education on a professional educator license and has passed the Elementary/Middle Grades test, Elementary Education test or Middle Grades test, as applicable to the endorsement held, or

 

2)         holds an elementary or a special K-12 endorsement valid for the subject taught and has passed the content-area test applicable to that subject, or

 

3)         through grade 3 only, holds an early childhood endorsement that is valid for the primary grades and has passed the Early Childhood test, or

 

4)         holds an elementary or special K-12 endorsement for self-contained general elementary education, or an elementary or a special K-12 endorsement valid for the subjects taught, or, through grade 3 only, an early childhood endorsement valid for the primary grades and qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable; or

 

b)         holds an educator license with stipulations endorsed for transitional bilingual educator and:

 

1)         has passed the content-area test applicable to the subject taught, and

 

2)         is continuously enrolled in an approved teacher preparation program applicable to the grade levels served, and

 

3)         is participating in an induction/mentoring program that conforms to the definition found in the regulations implementing the federal ESEA at 34 CFR 200.56(a)(2)(ii)(A) (2008), and

 

4)         has not exhausted the three-year period permitted under ESEA for attaining full licensure.

 

Middle Grades (6-8)

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects, other than ESL or ENL, whether in a self-contained or a departmentalized setting, will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she:

 

a)         holds a professional educator license with an endorsement for bilingual education or an educator license with stipulations endorsed for transitional bilingual educator and:

 

1)         holds an elementary or a special K-12 or a secondary endorsement valid for the subjects taught; and

 

2)         for each core subject area of teaching responsibility:

 

A)        has passed either the Elementary/Middle Grades test, Elementary Education test or Middle Grades test, as applicable to the endorsement held, or the content-area test specific to the subject taught, or

 

B)        has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major, or

 

C)        holds a master's or higher degree in a field directly related to the area of assignment, or

 

D)        holds an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license, or

 

E)        qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable; or

 

b)         holds an educator license with stipulations endorsed for transitional bilingual educator and:

 

1)         has passed the content-area test applicable to the subject taught, and

 

2)         is continuously enrolled in an approved teacher preparation program applicable to the grade levels served, and

 

3)         is participating in an induction/mentoring program that conforms to the definition found in the regulations implementing the federal ESEA at 34 CFR 200.56(a)(2)(ii)(A) (2008), and

 

4)         has not exhausted the three-year period permitted under ESEA for attaining full licensure.

 

Secondary Grades (9-12)

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects, other than ESL or ENL, will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she:

 

a)         holds a professional educator license with an endorsement for bilingual education or an educator license with stipulations endorsed for transitional bilingual educator and:

 

1)         holds a secondary, special K-12, or, for grade 9 only, elementary endorsement valid for the subjects taught, and

 

2)         for each core subject area of teaching assignment:

 

A)        has passed the relevant content-area test, or

 

B)        has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major, or

 

C)        holds a master's or higher degree in a field directly related to the area of assignment, or

 

D)        holds an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license, or

 

E)        qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable; or

 

b)         holds an educator license with stipulations endorsed for transitional bilingual educator and:

 

1)         has passed the content-area test applicable to the subject taught, and

 

2)         is continuously enrolled in an approved teacher preparation program applicable to the grade levels served, and

 

3)         is participating in an induction/mentoring program that conforms to the definition found in the regulations implementing the federal ESEA at 34 CFR 200.56(a)(2)(ii)(A) (2008), and

 

4)         has not exhausted the three-year period permitted under ESEA for attaining full licensure.

 

English as a Second Language (ESL) or English as a New Language (ENL)

 

A course with either of these titles is, by definition, a course in English (see 23 Ill. Adm. Code 228).

 

Kindergarten and Grades 1-5

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching ESL or ENL will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she:

 

a)         holds a professional educator license with an elementary or a special K-12 endorsement and an endorsement for bilingual education, ESL, or ENL and:

 

1)         has passed the Elementary/Middle Grades test, Elementary Education test or Middle Grades test, as applicable to the endorsement held, or the content-area test for ENL or English Language Arts, or

 

2)         qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable; or

 

b)         through grade 3 only, holds an early childhood endorsement valid for the primary grades and an endorsement for bilingual education, ESL, or ENL, and:

 

1)         has passed the Early Childhood test, or

 

2)         qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable; or

 

c)         holds an educator license with stipulations endorsed for transitional bilingual educator and:

 

1)         has passed the content-area test applicable to the subject taught, and

 

2)         is continuously enrolled in an approved teacher preparation program applicable to the grade levels served, and

 

3)         is participating in an induction/mentoring program that conforms to the definition found in the regulations implementing the federal ESEA at 34 CFR 200.56(a)(2)(ii)(A) (2008), and

 

4)         has not exhausted the three-year period permitted under ESEA for attaining full licensure.

 

Middle Grades (6-8)

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching ESL or ENL will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she:

 

a)         holds an elementary, a special K-12, or a secondary endorsement and an endorsement for ESL or ENL (or, for grades 5 and 6 only, an endorsement for bilingual education) and:

 

1)         has passed the Elementary/Middle Grades test, Elementary Education test or Middle Grades test, as applicable to the endorsement held, or the content-area test for either ENL or English Language Arts, or

 

2)         has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major in English language arts or the teaching of English as a new language, or

 

3)         holds a master's or higher degree in English language arts or the teaching of English as a new language, or

 

4)         holds an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license in English language arts or the teaching of English as a new language, or

 

5)         qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable; or

 

b)         for grade 6 only, holds an educator license with stipulations endorsed for transitional bilingual educator and:

 

1)         has passed the content-area test applicable to the subject taught, and

 

2)         is continuously enrolled in an approved teacher preparation program applicable to the grade levels served, and

 

3)         is participating in an induction/mentoring program that conforms to the definition found in the regulations implementing the federal ESEA at 34 CFR 200.56(a)(2)(ii)(A) (2008), and

 

4)         has not exhausted the three-year period permitted under NCLB for attaining full licensure.

 

Secondary Grades (9-12)

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching ESL or ENL will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she holds a secondary, a special K-12, or, for Grade 9 only, an elementary  endorsement and an endorsement for ESL or ENL and:

 

a)         has passed the content-area test for either ENL or English Language Arts, or

 

b)         has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major in English language arts or the teaching of English as a new language, or

 

c)         holds a master's or higher degree in English language arts or the teaching of English as a new language, or

 

d)         holds an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license in English language arts or the teaching of English as a New Language, or

 

e)         qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable.

 

Special Education

 

A special education teacher who is new to the profession, who is considered "highly qualified" in language arts, mathematics, or science, and who teaches two or more subjects shall be considered "highly qualified" in all subjects taught for two years after the date of first employment.  Once this two-year period has elapsed, the teacher shall be required to meet the criteria for being considered "highly qualified" in the core subject area of assignment.  However, it should be noted that a teacher in this situation will be treated as a veteran teacher after attaining one year's teaching experience, as is the case for any other teacher.  That is, the teacher has two years before he or she will be required to meet the criteria in every subject taught but will have access to points under the Illinois HOUSSE after one year's experience.

 

A special education teacher who has completed an Illinois approved preparation program in special education after June 30, 2002, and has also passed the assessment of professional teaching or TPA, as applicable, shall be considered "highly qualified" in language arts, by virtue of the subject-area competence cumulatively evidenced by the individual's:

 

●    completion of coursework addressing the General Curricular Standards for Special Education teachers set forth at 23 Ill. Adm. Code 27.350, as well as the Common Core of Standards for All Special Educators (23 Ill. Adm. Code 28, Standards for Certification in Special Education), which encompass numerous relevant knowledge and performance indicators;

 

●    passage of the test of basic skills covering reading comprehension, language arts, mathematics and writing; and

 

●    passage of the assessment of professional teaching, one of whose major components is language arts (see 23 Ill. Adm. Code 24.130).

 

Kindergarten and Grades 1-5

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she:

 

a)         holds either an elementary or a special preschool-age 21 endorsement for the student population served and has passed the Elementary/Middle Grades test, Elementary Education test or Middle Grades test, as applicable to the endorsement held; or

 

b)         holds either an elementary or a special K-12 endorsement valid for the subject taught and for the student population served, and has passed the content-area test applicable to the subject taught; or

 

c)         through grade 3 only, holds an early childhood endorsement that is valid for the primary grades and for early childhood special education, or holds a special preschool-age 21 endorsement for the student population served, and has passed the Early Childhood test or the Early Childhood Special Education test; or

 

d)         holds an elementary or a special preschool-age 21 endorsement for the student population served, or an early childhood endorsement that is valid for the primary grades, and qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable.

 

Middle Grades (6-8)

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she holds a professional educator license endorsed for special preschool-age 21 for the student population served, or an elementary, secondary, or special K-12 endorsement that is valid for the grade levels of the assignment and the subjects taught and for the student population served; and, for each core subject area taught:

 

a)         has passed either the Elementary/Middle Grades test, Elementary Education test or Middle Grades test, as applicable to the endorsement held, or the content-area test specific to the subject taught; or

 

b)         has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major; or

 

c)         holds a master's or higher degree in a field directly related to the area of assignment; or

 

d)         holds NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license; or

 

e)         qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable.

 

Middle-Grades Teachers Providing Instruction at the Primary Level

 

A teacher who provides instruction at the primary level to students of middle-grade age whose performance is assessed against alternate achievement standards will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she meets the criteria for either new or veteran special education teachers at either the primary or the middle-grade level, whether the teacher is a veteran or new to the profession.

 

Secondary Grades (9-12)

 

A teacher who has primary responsibility for teaching content in core academic subjects will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she holds a special preschool-age 21 endorsement for the student population served or an elementary, secondary, or special K-12 endorsement, as applicable to the grade levels of the assignment and for the student population served; and, for each core subject area taught:

 

a)         has passed the content-area test specific to the subject taught; or

 

b)         has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major; or

 

c)         holds a master's or higher degree in a field directly related to the area of assignment; or

 

d)         holds an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license; or

 

e)         qualifies with 100 points under the Illinois HOUSSE, if applicable.

 

Secondary Teachers Providing Instruction at the Primary or Middle-Grades Level

 

A teacher who provides instruction at the primary level or the middle-grades level to students of secondary school age whose performance is assessed against alternate achievement standards will be considered "highly qualified" if he or she meets the criteria for either new or veteran special education teachers at either the secondary level or the level at which instruction is provided, whether the teacher is a veteran or new to the profession.

 

Points Available Under the Illinois HOUSSE

 

The activities listed in this Appendix D shall be eligible for counting by teachers in general education, bilingual education, and special education.  In the case of special education, a given activity, other than teaching experience, may be counted only if it relates to the core academic subject taught rather than special education as the "area of assignment".

 

a)         Teaching experience in the subject area of assignment:  12.5 points per semester, up to a maximum of 50 points.  (Special education teachers may count teaching experience in special education as experience in each core academic subject taught.)

 

b)         Completion of college coursework in the core academic subject area of assignment:  5 points per semester hour.

 

c)         Possession of an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license applicable to the area of assignment:  100 points for a general education teacher in grades below 6 or a special education teacher.

 

d)         Completion of the required content-area coursework within the context of completing an Illinois approved educator preparation program in elementary education or an approved out-of-state elementary education preparation program offered by an institution that was accredited by NCATE at the time:  75 points for a teacher in a self-contained general education classroom through grade 8.  Completion of the required content-area coursework within the context of completing an Illinois approved early childhood education preparation program or an approved out-of-state early childhood preparation program offered by an institution that was accredited by NCATE at the time:  75 points for a teacher in a self-contained general education classroom through grade 3.  (This coursework may not also be counted for points under subsection (b).)

 

e)         Participation in conference sessions, workshops, institutes, seminars, symposia, or other similar training events that are directly related to the area of teaching assignment:  1 point per full hour of participation.

 

f)         Presenting at conference sessions, workshops, institutes, seminars, symposia, or other similar training events:  8 or 3 points, in accordance with Section 25.875(k).

 

g)         Work experience (non-teaching) directly related to the area of teaching assignment (e.g., experience in a chemical laboratory on the part of an individual teaching chemistry):  10 points per year of experience, up to a maximum of 50 points.

 

h)         Supervising a student teacher in the subject area of assignment:  10 points per student teacher, applicable to all subjects.

 

i)          Peer review or peer coaching that meets the requirements of Section 25.875(b):  5, 8, 9, or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(b)(2).

 

j)          Mentoring a new teacher in the subject area of assignment, provided that the mentoring arrangement conforms to the requirements of Section 25.875(c)(1)(A):  9 or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(c)(2)(A).

 

k)         Participation in site-based management or decision-making teams, relevant committees, boards, or task forces directly related to school improvement plans and focused on the core academic subject of assignment:  8 or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(d).  (May be counted only once per subject area.)

 

l)          Teaching a college course in accordance with Section 25.875(j) that is directly related to the subject area of assignment:  20 points.

 

m)        Participating in action research and inquiry projects that meet the requirements of Section 25.875(n) and are directly related to the subject area of assignment:  8 or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(n)(2).

 

n)         Approved travel related to the area of teaching assignment and meeting the requirements of Section 25.875(p):  12 or 15 points per year, in accordance with Section 25.875(p)(2).

 

o)         Participation in a study group directly related to the area of teaching assignment: 6 or 8 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(q).

 

p)         Participation in an internship directly related to the area of teaching assignment that meets the requirements of Section 25.875(s):  points in relation to contact hours per semester, as set forth in Section 25.875(s)(2).

 

q)         Participation in curriculum development or assessment activities that meet the requirements of Section 25.875(u) and are directly related to the subject area of assignment:  8 or 11 points per semester, in accordance with Section 25.875(u)(2).

 

r)          Publication of educational articles, columns, or books that are directly related to the subject area of assignment: points in accordance with Section 25.875(x)(2).

 

s)         Teacher-to-teacher consultation that includes activities such as observation, meetings, and exchange of information (whether face to face or via communications technology) and that relates to topics such as materials, curriculum, evidence-based practices, and techniques and strategies aligned to the State Goals for Learning (see 23 Ill. Adm. Code 1, Appendix D):  1 point per hour of interaction with a teacher who is "highly qualified" in the relevant core academic subject area, up to a maximum of 50 points.

 

t)          Possession of an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license in an area other than in the area of assignment:  15 points.

 

u)         Possession of an Illinois professional educator license endorsed in a teaching field in an area other than in the area of assignment:  10 points.

 

v)         Completion of a major or an approved program in special education with at least 15 points in each core academic subject taught:  75 points for a special education teacher who teaches two or more academic subjects exclusively to children with disabilities in the primary or middle grades.

 

Special Circumstances

 

Teachers in Charter Schools

 

A teacher who is employed in a charter school and who has primary responsibility for teaching content in any of the core academic subjects will be considered highly qualified if he or she either:

 

a)         holds a professional educator license applicable to the assignment and meets the other criteria applicable to the assignment, as outlined elsewhere in this Appendix D; or

 

b)         holds a bachelor's degree, has passed the relevant content-area test in each core subject area of teaching responsibility, and meets the other requirements of Section 27A-10(c) of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/27A-10(c)].

 

Teachers Who Hold an Educator License with Stipulations Endorsed for Alternative Provisional Educator

 

A teacher who holds an educator license with stipulations endorsed for alternative provisional educator (see Sections 21B-20(2)(B) and 21B-50 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21B-20(2)(B) and 21B-50]) that was attained through enrollment in  an approved Illinois program and who has primary responsibility for teaching content in the core academic subject for which the license was issued will be considered highly qualified because he or she has passed the applicable content-area test.  For an assignment in any additional core subject area (in the secondary or middle grades), a teacher with an educator license with stipulations endorsed for alternative provisional educator and for the secondary grades will be considered highly qualified if he or she has passed the relevant content-area test, has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major in that subject, holds a master's or higher degree in a field directly related to the subject, or holds an NBPTS designation on a professional educator license in the subject.

 

Resident Teachers

 

A teacher who holds an educator license with stipulations endorsed for resident teacher (see Section 21B-20(2)(D) of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21B-20(2)(D)]) and who has primary responsibility for teaching content in any of the core academic subjects will be considered highly qualified if he or she has passed the relevant content-area test for each core subject area of teaching assignment, which may include the Elementary/Middle Grades test if applicable to the grade level of the assignment, or, for assignments other than in the elementary grades, has completed a major or coursework equivalent to a major in that subject, holds a master's or higher degree in a field directly related to the subject, or holds an NBPTS master teacher designation on a professional educator license in the subject.

 

Visiting International Teachers

 

A teacher who holds an educator license with stipulations endorsed for visiting international educator (see Section 21B-20(2)(I) of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21B-20(2)(I)] and Section 25.92 of this Part) will be considered highly qualified based upon having passed a content-area test relevant to the subject taught as required under subsection (d)(3) of that Section, provided that the endorsement held is valid for the grade level or levels of his or her teaching assignment.

 

Career and Technical Educator

 

A teacher in a career and technical education program who has primary responsibility for teaching content for which students receive credit in a core academic subject (e.g., a teacher of an agricultural education course whose students receive credit in science) will be considered highly qualified only if he or she meets the requirements stated in this Appendix D as relevant to general education assignments at the grade level in question.

 

Physical Education and Health Teachers

 

In accordance with Section 21B-200 of the School Code [105 ILCS 5/21B-200], teachers who hold an endorsement either in physical education or health shall be considered highly qualified if they meet the requirements stated in this Appendix D as relevant to general education assignments at the grade level of instruction and shall present evidence of meeting those requirements if requested to do so by their school districts of employment.

 

(Source:  Amended at 39 Ill. Reg. 13722, effective October 5, 2015)